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Suggestion for trains

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posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 04:23 PM
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The following is probably not plausible. I dunno, I’m certainly not an engineer or an engineer... (
)

But if trains derail so often, and apparently they do, even if not as high profile as recent incidents, could we implement training rails, like two raised rails on both sides to stop tip overs?… Or maybe we could retrofit trains and rails for the tracks to be wider? I know it’d cost a lot, but I mean we just got an infrastructure deal, didn’t we? (Could be chem company, railroad, Federal, and/or local responsibility, I’m not sure)
And until it’s complete, I’d suggest designating some main cross-country lines as highest priority for the retrofit, and limiting dangerous loads to these(?)… And for those loads that needed to go on capillary routes, for distribution or whatnot, limiting how full each container can be?…

Like I said, this is probably not plausible. Not sure if it’d be worth it. Almost don’t want to post this… But it seems to be a hot topic at the moment… AND I would hate to be affected by a disaster, like the one that E-Pal appears to be.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 04:31 PM
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Huh? Trains are as great as they've always been. Rails too.
The problem isn't suddenly people forgot how to 'do trains', the problem is the NWO keeps purposely derailing them to break everything down.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: japhrimu

If you saw the pictures of the train tracks in Ohio-and many other states-you'd wonder why they're not happening every single day.

The budget always includes billions of dollars for our failing infrastructure, yet bridges collapse and dams break every year because the money never seems to trickle down to actual repairs or replacement.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: nugget1
a reply to: japhrimu

If you saw the pictures of the train tracks in Ohio-and many other states-you'd wonder why they're not happening every single day.

The budget always includes billions of dollars for our failing infrastructure, yet bridges collapse and dams break every year because the money never seems to trickle down to actual repairs or replacement.


I had to laugh at this. When I was a teen we used to go into the woods and play by the train tracks.
They were in bad shape back then, and I gander not much has been done since to ensure the track are even maintained. With that being said, some of this seems to venture into domestic terrorism territory. Who knows.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 05:11 PM
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a reply to: japhrimu

I suggest that until someone figures out how to get filthy rich doing it, it won't happen within the context of "government."

Frankly, I don't care to dive into the deep - deep - crevasse of people 'purposefully' engaging in devastatingly deadly destruction "on someone else's behalf."

This "poo" of piss-poor response to large-scale crises is the domain of the government (that 'assures us' that they care deeply about the citizens' welfare.)

By the way, train tech is NOT in its' infancy' ... they know how to load them, how fast they should go, and what is and isn't a 'safe practice.' Someone either ignored these things on 'their own judgment' or was 'told' to proceed...

If it was a criminal derailing where is the investigation? Or will it be "ongoing" until it can be scrubbed of liability for some otherwise guilty party. This is an example of why you should never allow 'anyone with money" to run your country's business.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: japhrimu

Side rails would be the cheapest option if it would work, I guess, and I'm not an engineer too. But I know that bypassing the train tracks away from a town/city will come with all sorts of problems and protests from the people living near the tracks. So, maybe ECP brakes on trains at the railway's expense is the way to go?

montreal.ctvnews.ca...



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 06:06 PM
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This is sabotage by state actors from Russia or China. Have you heard there's a war going on?



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 06:10 PM
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Derailments happen three times a day and the majority are very minor.
Honestly the best way to reduce the risk of hazardous chemical spills is to lower the speed and length of trains with dangerous cargo.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 06:22 PM
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Have a porous southern border and go around blowing up pipelines? What could go wrong?



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 06:25 PM
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Perhaps pipelines would be a better idea????

Nahhh





posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: japhrimu

It's a convergence of several issues. Lack of enough rail workers, too long trains, and infrastructure is also a problem.




posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 07:29 PM
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originally posted by: bounder
This is sabotage by state actors from Russia or China. Have you heard there's a war going on?
Sure,try closer to home.
Don't suppose you want to buy a bridge?



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: watchitburn

Can we stop pretending that the track in this video is anything like what was involved in this crash?



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 08:23 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Who's pretending?

I never suggested it was.

But it is an example of how neglected our rail infrastructure is. And I'm willing to bet it's a big reason for our average of 3 derailments per day.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 08:38 PM
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The rail industry has largely bought it's way out of government regulation over the past couple of decades. Train lengths have tripled and crew size has been cut by two thirds- because 'technology'. Of course we never see this wonderful technology outside choreographed demonstrations. Unfortunately material wear is still the end result of use and one of the industry buzzwords is "reduce excessive maintenance". We are seeing the results. Much of the nation's rail network is still using 1940's technology.

There are two things that could reduce the frequency and severity of derailments. first, require the industry to upgrade all mainline track to welded rail and including trackside hot wheel bearing and dragging equipment detectors every 15 miles at a minimum. this is proven 20th century tech that really works when it is maintained.

Second reduce train length and weight allowances. Since the industry has been allowed to reduce train crew size down to 2 (and sometimes only1) person on a train, the train length should be reduced to what that number of crew members can visually monitor on a frequent basis. This would greatly reduce the severity of in-train forces and reduce damage to the track structure as well.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 09:01 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: Bluntone22

Who's pretending?

I never suggested it was.

But it is an example of how neglected our rail infrastructure is. And I'm willing to bet it's a big reason for our average of 3 derailments per day.



It’s a bad example.
No class one railroad in the country operates on rail in that condition.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 09:14 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22


It’s a bad example.
No class one railroad in the country operates on rail in that condition.





Of course not main line, but I have seen several industry and branch lines similar.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Montana

This is good stuff - you should be on prime time news repeating all of that.



posted on Feb, 21 2023 @ 09:34 PM
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a reply to: quintessentone

Most rails have been saying exactly this for many years, but no one listens.



posted on Feb, 22 2023 @ 05:28 PM
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originally posted by: japhrimu
The following is probably not plausible. I dunno, I’m certainly not an engineer or an engineer... (
)

But if trains derail so often, and apparently they do, even if not as high profile as recent incidents, could we implement training rails, like two raised rails on both sides to stop tip overs?… Or maybe we could retrofit trains and rails for the tracks to be wider? I know it’d cost a lot, but I mean we just got an infrastructure deal, didn’t we? (Could be chem company, railroad, Federal, and/or local responsibility, I’m not sure)
And until it’s complete, I’d suggest designating some main cross-country lines as highest priority for the retrofit, and limiting dangerous loads to these(?)… And for those loads that needed to go on capillary routes, for distribution or whatnot, limiting how full each container can be?…

Like I said, this is probably not plausible. Not sure if it’d be worth it. Almost don’t want to post this… But it seems to be a hot topic at the moment… AND I would hate to be affected by a disaster, like the one that E-Pal appears to be.


We know how to train. Our evil overlords are trying to kill us all. If they gave any #s about us they would have monorails all over the country and hyperloops. This is end game for them, do not expect any change until we throw them over collectively.



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