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Einstein’s Corpus Callosum Explains His Genius-Level Intellect

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posted on Oct, 5 2013 @ 09:24 PM
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guardianlv.com...

No, it doesn't. It only points toward the possibility that those folks with more pronounced corpus callosum may hold an advantage in the task of solving difficult problems that probably require the proverbial out-of-the-box thinking. Only a study aimed at establishing a correlation between the physiology of corpus callosum and abstract thinking can underline the title of the article and its scientific validity.

The article suggests that there is no person with similarly developed corpus callosum who wouldn't distinguish himself or herself, but there is no evidence of that. Of course, it's too soon to make such a conclusion, but I strongly suspect that the follow up of the study, if ever be anything like that, would ever confirm what has been suggested.

Albert Einstein case often threw the monkey wrench into the basket of various claims that have been sold to the public as "scientific facts." No wonder that the mainstream science ever hungry for grants would hurry up to fix the leak hoping that the appeal to authority would take care of the rest - as it is usually the case.




posted on Oct, 5 2013 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by tremex
 

I thought the secret to his "genius" was wonder? He would wonder about things. About why he didn't feel like he was falling in an elevator or why the perspective he viewed the mountains from on a train changed slower than the foreground. Wherever he went he would wonder what if about ordinary events in his life.

Thats the key-- Wonder.



posted on Oct, 5 2013 @ 10:15 PM
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tremex
guardianlv.com...

No, it doesn't. It only points toward the possibility that those folks with more pronounced corpus callosum may hold an advantage in the task of solving difficult problems that probably require the proverbial out-of-the-box thinking. Only a study aimed at establishing a correlation between the physiology of corpus callosum and abstract thinking can underline the title of the article and its scientific validity.

The article suggests that there is no person with similarly developed corpus callosum who wouldn't distinguish himself or herself, but there is no evidence of that. Of course, it's too soon to make such a conclusion, but I strongly suspect that the follow up of the study, if ever be anything like that, would ever confirm what has been suggested.

Albert Einstein case often threw the monkey wrench into the basket of various claims that have been sold to the public as "scientific facts." No wonder that the mainstream science ever hungry for grants would hurry up to fix the leak hoping that the appeal to authority would take care of the rest - as it is usually the case.



The obsession over him is rather odd. His contribution to killing masses of people with nuclear weapons is noted, but does that make every aspect of his existence god like? Folks drool over his brain like they do the shroud of turin.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Yes, i was just posting something like this while espousing the merits of a healthy imagination. I said that I "imagine" that Al had to use his in order to come up with the relativity theory. Especially since there were no tools or words really to describe what he was thinking. It only existed in his mind at first.

Random thought: I wonder how much more we could do or remember with our minds if we didn't have to remember things like the meanings of words, grammatical rules, and stuff like that... Like if there was a way for our minds to work and communicate in pure concepts without the "middle man" of letters and words, written and spoken...agreed upon symbols.

Somebody said that if we went back to hieroglyphics it would somehow free up parts of our mind or would somehow be much better. Oh yeah that was that "conversation with an alien" transcript where supposedly some guys at CERN made contact or something...



posted on Oct, 7 2013 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by tremex
 


In a 2007 report, The Guardian discussed the other finding from a 1985 analysis of Einstein's brain by Marilyn Diamond and her colleagues at UC Berkeley, that the number of glial cells (connectors between neurons) in parts of his brain was much higher than in a control sample of men's brains (deceased doctors). That's more information on that research topic than the one sentence in the OP 2013 Guardian report:

www.theguardian.com...
edit on 10/7/2013 by Uphill because: Add text.






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