Wanted: Tips on reducing recoil

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posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 05:29 PM
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EFK Firedragon™

Frame-Saver Dual Action Recoil Spring
www.efkfiredragon.com...

I wanted to know if anyone had tried one of these, or a similar product. I've begun to take an interest in speed shooting and getting back on target as quickly as possible is a must. I have a Ruger P 90 .45 and the recoil is honestly not bad at all, [I'd compare it to some 9mm I've shot] but, every little bit helps. If you've tried one of these or another product and had good results, I'd like to hear about it. I don't mind spending around $100, but I'm not gonna shell out for every little gimmick.
Gotta go , but I'll check back later.
Thanks in advance.




posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 06:08 PM
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Not a bad spring at all. I'd get one if they made one for my pistol..

Best I can recommend is the Hogue Grips, and a lighter load.



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by jough626
 



I've got the grips [ love'em ] and I'm going to try the 185 grain, see if that helps.
- Thanks



posted on Feb, 3 2013 @ 11:46 PM
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reload your own.
use less powder...



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 01:42 AM
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The spring and a compensator with good grips will work wonders.
Also, a cold load (minimum powder) would work great.



posted on Feb, 7 2013 @ 03:50 AM
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Originally posted by DAVID64
EFK Firedragon™

Frame-Saver Dual Action Recoil Spring
www.efkfiredragon.com...

I wanted to know if anyone had tried one of these, or a similar product. I've begun to take an interest in speed shooting and getting back on target as quickly as possible is a must. I have a Ruger P 90 .45 and the recoil is honestly not bad at all, [I'd compare it to some 9mm I've shot] but, every little bit helps. If you've tried one of these or another product and had good results, I'd like to hear about it. I don't mind spending around $100, but I'm not gonna shell out for every little gimmick.
Gotta go , but I'll check back later.
Thanks in advance.


Check into Wolff Brand springs. Here's a link to their Ruger section:
gun springs

I think you'll like their pricing.

I was just there earlier this evening. I'm getting ready to take my H&K USP 45 full size from .45ACP to .45 Super.



posted on Feb, 12 2013 @ 07:04 PM
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Well, OP, what's the verdict?
Did you find what you were looking for? I'd be interested to know if your solution panned out?
As I stated in the above post, I'm considering doing this myself.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 11:05 PM
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The only way you'll reduce ~recoil~ is by a lower power load.

Managing the "felt" recoil impulse can be done a number of ways. The methods I suggest - in order:


  • Train more with your full power loads, nothing beats more drills for recoil management.
  • Hogue grips..
  • Messing with springs often results in malfunctions so start with a heavier guide rod (tungsten) if available.
  • Wolff spring set - get the set so you can experiment with weight increments.
  • And if you're looking for a dual-spring based system then Sprinco - no doubt about it. Not Springco - Sprinco. Better than any of the rest in terms of build quality, customer service, and function.


Cheers, -Mags



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 12:05 PM
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Managing recoil is best done through constant training and drilling in proper technique, stance, breathing, and especially firearm handling.

In real world defensive case scenarios you're not likely going to get to just stand there and plink away at a bad guy. Training with low-powder loads, while an effective way to reduce felt recoil, going to hurt you in the long run if you carry your gun for SD. Practice with what you carry. Practice with what you carry. Practice with what you carry.

If you're not carrying it for SD or otherwise, or have no expectation to ever need it for a real world scenario - then yeah. Go heavy for caliber and the lowest powder load you can without causing FTE's or squibs. However, if you are taking to the range for more than just recreational shooting, then you need to focus on your grip, especially in multiple stances, from modern isosceles to one handed on your back. Proper grip and handling will do the most to control your recoil.

Things you -can- do to help on the mechanical end do include either dual springs or progressive springs - though anecdotal reports exist of them causing FTE or similar issues.

Also, carry heavy for caliber. If you're shooting .45, go with the heaviest grain you can, something like 235. Heavier bullets exit slower, and that will help the felt recoil. It also has the benefit of hitting your BG with a heavier bullet, a net gain.

Either way though I'd focus more on grip and drills then trying to find a gimmick to tame recoil. Recoil is an entirely physical reaction, and appropriate grip will go a long ways to helping more with that then a recoil spring.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by UnmitigatedDisaster
 


Did you read the OP? It's going to be for fun/speed shooting. I train quite frequently, shooting from different stances, different positions [standing,kneeling, lying down etc] multiple targets and from different cover. I was interested to see if anyone had used that product and what results they had. But thanks for the comment.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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Wow apparently I did not read it as well as I thought.

In that case I'd still avoid light-loads, just to avoid potential FTE's or squibs, but stay with heavy for caliber. A dual recoil spring would help, but I'd go with a heavier guide rod first as someone suggested. A good trigger job to make each pull light and consistent, and again: proper grip. Sorry but that still doesn't change





 
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