Modern Man and 90% of brain

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posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 05:25 AM
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is Modern Man is the only species(at least among hominids) which 90% of brains are glial cells that just for feeding 10% of brains?




posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 05:35 AM
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reply to post by masonicon
 


sometimes yes sometimes no.
what do you think man? Tell me your opinion..
greetings from germany



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 05:39 AM
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Originally posted by Anunaki2012
reply to post by masonicon
 


sometimes yes sometimes no.
what do you think man? Tell me your opinion..
greetings from germany

Anatomically Modern Homo Sapiens are the only species whose their brains is 90% made from Glial Tissues that solely feeds 10% Handfuls of brain, according to common theory.

and this probably makes we and our species is too often portrayed in fiction as the only lifeforms that have no Superhuman powers
edit on 1/3/2012 by masonicon because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 05:53 AM
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reply to post by masonicon
 


hmm my englsih is not the best...
i think when humans use 90% of his Brain, he can change the materia..
mind over matter.
i think we do it all the time without knowing we do..
you know iam sayn?



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 05:54 AM
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Originally posted by Anunaki2012
reply to post by masonicon
 


hmm my englsih is not the best...
i think when humans use 90% of his Brain, he can change the materia..
mind over matter.
i think we do it all the time without knowing we do..
you know iam sayn?

Yeah!



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 06:02 AM
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Originally posted by masonicon
and this probably makes we and our species is too often portrayed in fiction as the only lifeforms that have no Superhuman powers


Hmm...I think that is a contradiction in terms. I presume that you mean that we lack extrasensory perceptions that other creatures possess, because if those creatures had 'superhuman' powers...well...I'm not rightly sure what you mean...
edit on 1-3-2012 by Biliverdin because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by Biliverdin

Originally posted by masonicon
and this probably makes we and our species is too often portrayed in fiction as the only lifeforms that have no Superhuman powers


Hmm...I think that is a contradiction in terms. I presume that you mean that we lack extrasensory perceptions that other creatures possess, because if those creatures had 'superhuman' powers...well...I'm not rightly sure what you mean...
edit on 1-3-2012 by Biliverdin because: (no reason given)

maybe!



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 08:24 AM
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Claim: We only use 10% of our brains

Status: FALSE

www.snopes.com...

Seriously, this old chestnut?

I don't know about you, but I use my brain!

And super logical on how it works, can you only electrify 10% of a puddle? Sheesh...



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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Originally posted by adigregorio

Claim: We only use 10% of our brains

Status: FALSE

www.snopes.com...

Seriously, this old chestnut?

I don't know about you, but I use my brain!

And super logical on how it works, can you only electrify 10% of a puddle? Sheesh...

Thank you! I can't believe this stupid urban legend is still making the rounds.



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by Thain Esh Kelch
 


That's the problem with "magic", it never makes any sense. Of course makes mucho cents...

If one only used 10% of their brain, one would be dying or almost dead. Maybe in a coma too, not to smart when it comes to brain surgery.

If someone says you only use 10% of your brain, it is because they want you to use 90% of your wallet.
-Me



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by adigregorio
 


He didn't say we use only 10% of our brain. He asked if having 90% Glial cells in our brain is unique to us.

To the OP:Scientists are just starting to realize glial cells may have a part in higher brain function, where before they assumed glial cells were only the structure of the brain. Astrocytes are the most abundant cell in the brain and function in many ways like neurons, but they use calcium rather than electricity to communicate.

edit on 1-3-2012 by Buddha1098 because: (no reason given)
edit on 1-3-2012 by Buddha1098 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by masonicon

Originally posted by Biliverdin

Originally posted by masonicon
and this probably makes we and our species is too often portrayed in fiction as the only lifeforms that have no Superhuman powers


Hmm...I think that is a contradiction in terms. I presume that you mean that we lack extrasensory perceptions that other creatures possess, because if those creatures had 'superhuman' powers...well...I'm not rightly sure what you mean...

maybe!


Okay...well, 'maybe' doesn't really clarify much, but let's see what we can do...primarily it seems from a quick look, that it is not so much that they unused, as their use or function is not properly (or even at all) understood. But perhaps, anyway, that is irrelevent to the point you are making, you seem to be more inclined to understand why our senses are limited, and there may indeed be a relationship.

Most other creatures, the snake is a very good example, view the world in four dimensions, they can 'see', for example in scent, this gives them not only a predatory advantage, but also a defensive one. Other creatures can see in ultra violet, which again gives them certain advantages. Over time, however, humans have found that they work best using only their sight, touch, hearing and taste/smell (hard to differentiate those two). It is likely that when we were less social, and less structured socially, that we would have had a greater sensitivity in some of those senses, but over time, through sexual and natural selection, those senses were un-necessary and were therefore bred out. Or even, possibly, eradicated in other, more ruthless means, as they represented a threat to some forms of social structure. Or simply were not valued. And, diet plays a huge role. Although most of our light receivers are focused in our eyes, we do have the ability to percieve light through other tissues, we simply are not, trained to do so. From birth the emphasis is placed on those primary receptors, and therefore they receive the stimulation to thrive over any other means.

A person who is blind from birth does not for example see in a conventional sense, but that does not mean that they are not able to 'read' and interpret their environment. Similarly a deaf person can still percieve sound, just not in the same way as others. So, in short, 'superhuman' powers, should be a matter a training, and to some extent diet too, but whether this would change the way the brain uses glial cells is beyond my scope of understanding. However, certainly, if you start early enough, you can train the brain to process whatever information you primarily want it to, in theory. Huge ethical problems in testing such a theory though. 'Wild' children hold some clues though.



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by Buddha1098
 


Actually, he didn't really say much of anything. One liner responses are a no-no, but his one-liner post (obviously confusing) is...

Anyway, I still stand by my comment. Considering several others are/were thinking the same thing.

PS How about some information, sources? I mean, I could write a one line sentence too!



posted on Mar, 1 2012 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by Biliverdin

Originally posted by masonicon

Originally posted by Biliverdin

Originally posted by masonicon
and this probably makes we and our species is too often portrayed in fiction as the only lifeforms that have no Superhuman powers


Hmm...I think that is a contradiction in terms. I presume that you mean that we lack extrasensory perceptions that other creatures possess, because if those creatures had 'superhuman' powers...well...I'm not rightly sure what you mean...

maybe!


Okay...well, 'maybe' doesn't really clarify much, but let's see what we can do...primarily it seems from a quick look, that it is not so much that they unused, as their use or function is not properly (or even at all) understood. But perhaps, anyway, that is irrelevent to the point you are making, you seem to be more inclined to understand why our senses are limited, and there may indeed be a relationship.

Most other creatures, the snake is a very good example, view the world in four dimensions, they can 'see', for example in scent, this gives them not only a predatory advantage, but also a defensive one. Other creatures can see in ultra violet, which again gives them certain advantages. Over time, however, humans have found that they work best using only their sight, touch, hearing and taste/smell (hard to differentiate those two). It is likely that when we were less social, and less structured socially, that we would have had a greater sensitivity in some of those senses, but over time, through sexual and natural selection, those senses were un-necessary and were therefore bred out. Or even, possibly, eradicated in other, more ruthless means, as they represented a threat to some forms of social structure. Or simply were not valued. And, diet plays a huge role. Although most of our light receivers are focused in our eyes, we do have the ability to percieve light through other tissues, we simply are not, trained to do so. From birth the emphasis is placed on those primary receptors, and therefore they receive the stimulation to thrive over any other means.

A person who is blind from birth does not for example see in a conventional sense, but that does not mean that they are not able to 'read' and interpret their environment. Similarly a deaf person can still percieve sound, just not in the same way as others. So, in short, 'superhuman' powers, should be a matter a training, and to some extent diet too, but whether this would change the way the brain uses glial cells is beyond my scope of understanding. However, certainly, if you start early enough, you can train the brain to process whatever information you primarily want it to, in theory. Huge ethical problems in testing such a theory though. 'Wild' children hold some clues though.


Just to add insult, those that controls the society rewrite our history into like this: for the whole history(from the very beginning of mankind to today), we only uses sight, touch, hearing and taste/smell

and when processing something is too much for grey matter, our glial cells can backs up for grey matter
edit on 1/3/2012 by masonicon because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2012 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by masonicon
Just to add insult, those that controls the society rewrite our history into like this: for the whole history(from the very beginning of mankind to today), we only uses sight, touch, hearing and taste/smell


I'm not sure it is so much that, as most people not considering the experience of others, if it is outside of their own experience. A failure to look beyond the end of one's own nose, so to speak. Plus jealousy, or fear can sometimes play it's part. We are though, very much bound by our own ability to percieve, and as often as not, we prefer to think that we are 'normal' and that anything else is 'abnormal'. If I say to a room full of physicists, for example, that I can read someone else's thoughts, I am likely to be faced with incredulity, if not outright derision. However, make that same statement in a room full of practicing hypnotherapists and they would probably accept it as a given. It depends very much on the company that you keep, and who you present the information to.


Originally posted by masonicon
and when processing something is too much for grey matter, our glial cells can backs up for grey matter


The brain is highly complex and largely a mystery. And the way in which neural pathways are constructed throughout our development, to maturity and beyond, are somewhat unique to experience and the stimulation that we experience during those key periods of development. There was a case of a woman who lost half her brain and shouldn't have been able to function, but was able to, eventually, because the brain seemingly found new routes to convey the necessary information. So yes, I agree, but as I said before, you have to work hard to train the brain to do what you require of it, but it does, in that sense seem to be incredibly plastic. I am though unsure of what role glial cells play in all that, perhaps they have morphic abilities, I don't really know.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 11:39 PM
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great question.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 03:44 AM
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The 10% figure is completely wrong and was debunked a LONG time ago



posted on Mar, 16 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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Originally posted by informationstorage
great question.

this can makes greatest question ever





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