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Mammal cryptids.

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posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 12:30 PM
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As you gusy can see, i'm kinda bored. So i deiced to search around for some mammal cryptids people reported. Some of them were belvied to be extinct, others weren't. Anyway, i picked the most unownk creatures.

Queensland Tiger




The Queensland tiger is a cryptid reported to live in the Queensland area in eastern Australia.
Also known by its native name, the yarri, it is described as being a dog-sized feline with stripes and a long tail, prominent front teeth and a savage temperament. It has been hypothesized to be a survivor or descendant of the large predatory marsupial Thylacoleo, officially considered to be extinct, or possibly a large feral cat variant (given possible discrepancies with thylacoleo dentition). In 1926 A. S. le Souef described it as being a ‘Striped marsupial cat’ in The Wild Animals of Australasia, this information later also included in Furred Mammals of Australia, by Ellis Troughton, longtime curator of mammals in the Australian Museum. Among cryptids it has arguably come closest to official recognition.


The earliest documented witness reports of the Queensland marsupial tiger date from 1871, with indigenous traditions of the yarri preceding these.Reports indicate that it is fast and agile (Welfare & Fairley, 1981). Reports have come consistently from the Northeast of Queensland. Though these have diminished in number since the 1950s, they continue to occur (the Beast of Buderim being one recent example of the phenomenon).

Thylacoleo, an animal of similar size and predatory habits, did live in Australia as recently as the late Pleistocene period, perhaps coexisting with the very first humans that arrived at Australia who were the ancestors of modern Australian Aborigines. However, scientists estimate that Thylacoleo went extinct 30,000 years ago. Modern sightings of an animal described as remarkably like Thylacoleo have led some researchers to speculate that a small relict population has somehow survived in remote areas. Cryptozoologists who promote the theory of survival of the Tasmanian Tiger or Thylacine Thylacinus cynocephalus, a Thylacinid, and also currently accepted as extinct, favour proposed survival of The Queensland Tiger. The fundamental difference between the two cases, however, is that the last Tasmanian Tiger in captivity died in 1936, and the species was not officially declared as extinct until 1986. This makes the prospect of species survival of the Thylacine more likely than that of Thylacoleo.

The theory of continued Thylacoleo presence on mainland Australia and Thylacine presence in Tasmania has been covered on various Television shows including an episode of Animal Planet's show Animal X and on The National Geographic Channel. Individual sightings of the Queensland marsupial tiger continue to appear in newspapers, though in far less numbers than formerly. In the 1970s, naturalist Janeice Plunkett collected over 100 reports of sightings or shootings of "tigers", including reports clearly indicating that the animal observed was a marsupial. Some writers believe that, if the animal did formerly exist, it may now be extinct, given the diminishing numbers of tiger quolls and Northern quolls across the same region.

Here's a photo taken of a suppostely Quuensland Tiger:



Marozi


The marozi or spotted lion is variously claimed by zoologists and cryptozoologists to be a distinct race of lion adapted for a montane rather than savanna-dwelling existence, a rare natural hybrid of a leopard and lion, or an adult lion that retained its childhood spots. It is believed to have been smaller than a lion but slightly larger in size than a leopard and lacking any distinguishable mane. It has been reported in the wild and the skin of a specimen exists, but it has yet to be confirmed as either a separate species or subspecies. Belgian cryptozoologist Dr Bernard Heuvelmans proposed the specific name Leo maculatus in 1955.


While African natives have been familiar with the animal and Europeans have been reported seeing spotted lions since roughly 1904, the first documentable encounter by a European was in 1931 when Kenyan farmer Michael Trent shot and killed two individuals in the Aberdare Mountains region at an elevation of 10,000 feet (3,000 m). The unusual spotted markings on what seemed to be smallish adult lions prompted interest from the Nairobi Game Department; they were from pubescent lions and yet had prominent spots that are typical only of cubs.

Two years later, explorer Kenneth Gandar-Dower headed an expedition into the region in an attempt to capture or kill more specimens. He returned with only circumstantial evidence: three sets of tracks found at a similar elevation as Trent's lions (10,000–12,500 feet or 3,000–3,800 metres). They were believed to have been left by individuals that were tracking a herd of buffalo during a hunt, ruling out the possibility of the marozi being cubs. Dower also discovered that the natives had long differentiated the marozi from lions or leopards, which they referred to by different names. Aside from that, he found out that the marozi had also been called different names in other regions, such as "ntararago" in Uganda, "ikimizi" in Rwanda, and "abasambo" in Ethiopia. Notes on the marozi are included in The Spotted Lion by Kenneth Gandar Dower; On The Track of Unknown Animals by Bernard Heuvelmans and Mystery Cats of the World by Dr Karl Shuker.[1] R.I. Pocock examined a skin and skull collected by Michael Trent, and discussed his findings in an appendix to Gandar Dower's book, but he could not reach definite conclusions on the limited evidence available.
There were other sightings around the same time:

-Four animals sighted by Game Warden Captain R.E.Dent in the Aberdare Mountain region at an elevation of 10,000 feet (3,000 m).

-A pair sighted on the Kinangop Plateau by G. Hamilton-Snowball at an elevation of 11,500 feet (3,500 m). They were shot at but escaped.

Reports of the marozi have surfaced from the Aberdare region since the 1930s and it is believed that the population has long since become extinct. Reports of spotted lions are still fairly common throughout other parts of Africa, though.

There are reprts of other mammal like animals which are kinda unknown. I will give a list:

-Saber-Toothed cats.
-Blue Saber-Toothed cats.
-Lions in Amazon Rainforest.
-Black Lions.
-Mngwa.

Sources: en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 21-9-2013 by Frocharocha because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-9-2013 by Frocharocha because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2013 @ 09:17 AM
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I honestly dont believe we have many mammal cryptids left to find.

I was watching a programme on discovery once about the site of the ark of the covenant. In this documentary they had found some scrolls which had been written on hydes of creatures that dont exist anymore.

the rate humans have been wiping mammals out I would not be suprised if just 200 years ago some of these mammals that you are talking about were still roaming the earth.



posted on Sep, 27 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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Skilluminati
I honestly dont believe we have many mammal cryptids left to find.

I was watching a programme on discovery once about the site of the ark of the covenant. In this documentary they had found some scrolls which had been written on hydes of creatures that dont exist anymore.

the rate humans have been wiping mammals out I would not be suprised if just 200 years ago some of these mammals that you are talking about were still roaming the earth.



Yup. That's some thing that worries e also. The natives of those regions state that these creatures can't be seen anymore. A good example is the wooly mammoth. There aren't reports of wooly mamoths for decades on Siberia. The natives stated that they were hunted for extinction for providing them a lot of food.



 
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