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First post. Not entirely sure how this works. I have some interesting UFO footage though.

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posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 05:42 AM
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reply to post by EcakCake
 


More information would be good first approx location and direction facing and the type of camera. Also looks like the camera was using autofocus not the best way to film objects like that.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 06:05 AM
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reply to post by gortex
 


I don't think it's a star reason being most small video cameras cant show a star the level of brightness is to low the camera will be taking 15-30 fps depending on settings it have a very small sensor that perform poor in very low light.

To get stars to show on pictures you have to have a sensor capable of a very high iso setting and the shutter will be open for a fraction of a second.

You can't take 15-30 pictures per second on a consumer video and film a star.

From a video forum a member asked about filming stars and was told.


For what you want, a consumer camcorder isn't going to make it. All camcorders need light, quite a lot of it in fact. The manufacturers claim that their camcorders work in candlelight, which they do by artificially boosting the signal, causing electronic noise. Your night sky will end up looking like a grainy mess.

I would suggest using a stills camera to record the stars (it's not like they move enough to warrant a "movie" camera) and incorporate the images into your video using panning and zooming of the still image to give the impression of movement.

Even with a decent CMOS chip you need exposures of a half a second or more to get stars to record, this doesn't work well when the camcorder has to record 25 images a second.


Its an aircraft.

Here is a still from his video I downloaded and boosted the exposure level.



You can see the problems.


edit on 13-8-2013 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 09:42 AM
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Irregardless of the video, in this case there is testimony. Read it and stop making the star or bug posts because all you get with videos is a poor quality one, and testimony.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 09:55 AM
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Originally posted by Unity_99
Irregardless of the video, in this case there is testimony. Read it and stop making the star or bug posts because all you get with videos is a poor quality one, and testimony.



Why don't you post your evidence OH that's right you can't!!

The evidence here is in the equipment, it's NOT stars and it's not bugs it's the usual youtube video of aircraft lights in the distance.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


we were facing northeast when the footage was filmed with a sony hdr-cx220



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 03:49 PM
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I saw something the other day also , I did take photo with a Canon Power Shot and still just looks like an orb or something..

That said, the sighting the other day was nothing like the one I saw about 8 years ago. That one is for the record books, lights seperating then merging together. I can assure you, had I gotten that on film there would no longer be a quesion of UFO's. As it stands now, no one care, because I didn't get footage. *shrug*



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 04:01 PM
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Hi there.

Its kinda hard to get a good image of an object at a distance in the dark.

Its hard to make out due to the camara shakes.

Still though, its about making the effort and thinking how to catch the image better next time.

Either have a tripod or rest against a solid object to steady the image. Hopefully the camera may be able to focus better then.

eee.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 04:06 PM
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I have a tripod, want it?.

Just pay shipping and it's yours.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 04:06 PM
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my cousin, also a witness of the event took this picture from the footage.

original:


enhanced:



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by MyHappyDogShiner
 


thanks for the offer. i have one though, i'll bring it along next time i'm in the area.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 06:59 PM
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Apparently footage was taken of the incident last night (I let them borrow my camera). Has not been re-watched yet. Taking tripod to the area tonight. Will upload any new findings asap.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by EcakCake
 


I got go with gortex on this one its scintilating star thats why appears to change colour ive mistaken these for UFO's myself in the past.

Starred you for the effort though



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 12:23 AM
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We have been observing a ufo move very slowly in various patterns for the past two hours. Took footage using tripod, importing now. Looks promising.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 01:25 AM
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new footage shows starlike object moving diagonally across the sky. most likely a satellite but it moves much slower.

will upload soon



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 02:14 AM
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Originally posted by anomalie
reply to post by EcakCake
 


I got go with gortex on this one its scintilating star thats why appears to change colour ive mistaken these for UFO's myself in the past.

Starred you for the effort though


I posted earlier about this a consumer video camera shooting at 30 fps will not record starlight also as he was facing northeast and the star most people see this happening with is Sirius which is in the Southern part of the sky it cant be that.

From a video camera forum.


For what you want, a consumer camcorder isn't going to make it. All camcorders need light, quite a lot of it in fact. The manufacturers claim that their camcorders work in candlelight, which they do by artificially boosting the signal, causing electronic noise. Your night sky will end up looking like a grainy mess.

I would suggest using a stills camera to record the stars (it's not like they move enough to warrant a "movie" camera) and incorporate the images into your video using panning and zooming of the still image to give the impression of movement.

Even with a decent CMOS chip you need exposures of a half a second or more to get stars to record, this doesn't work well when the camcorder has to record 25 images a second.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 02:33 AM
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If we're going to go with stars, it's Capella, without question... it even looks like it on the video to me.

Also, my "consumer video camera" must be totally busted, because I do it all the time at 30 FPS.

If you want an example, It'll take me a moment to convert (and shorten) something to upload, as 30 minutes in .mpg is approx 1.1G, the way I record. I have hours to choose from.

Not going to hassle it unless you really want to see it though.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 03:17 AM
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Originally posted by EcakCake
reply to post by wmd_2008
 


we were facing northeast when the footage was filmed with a sony hdr-cx220


Hi a star for the reply nice camera I have a Sony myself a Sony SLT DSLR to give you an idea the sensor on you camer is 3.1 mm across the diagonal (1/5.8" type) CMOS Sensor 8.9mp, my camera is an APS-C 16MP but the sensor is 28.3mm on the diagonal .

Your camera in low lux mode ie low light level is 3 lux to give a reasonable image if you look up 3 lux for a light level this gives an indication of brightness.


3.4 lux Dark limit of civil twilight under a clear sky


What that looks like


This is considered as a twilight level of light.


If your camera films below that picture quality will drop very quickly.

From your given location and direction facing you have 5 airfields in 20 mile radius.
Your camera was pushed beyond it's limits it's not a star so most likely an aircraft.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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www.youtube.com...

Footage from last night, taken on a tripod, sped up 1600x. Not any recognizable star on the stargazing app. Moved too slow to be a satellite. Thoughts?



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 01:47 PM
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posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 02:16 PM
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reply to post by EcakCake
 


I'm afraid I must concur with other posters, it just looks like someone has been trying to film a star and has shaken the camera. I spent the whole night watching the Perseids and saw nothing unusual (I am based in the UK).



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