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Political Stupidity: Let's Ban Halloween

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posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:02 PM
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No, it's really not a joke. It seems that some of the leaders a town in Louisiana want to ban Halloween next year because it's "satanic." Now, I admit I eat a sniful number of calories in haloween candy, but that's bout the extent of my satanic activities in October.

www.2theadvocate.com...


Odd

posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:14 PM
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Good luck, guys... it'll never make it past a town level, and people will celebrate regardless. What are they going to do, call out the national guard against a bunch of kids in bed sheets and latex masks?



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:18 PM
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You know religious fundamentalist has tried to do this for years but with not success, I have notices lately a spring of religious fundamentalist agendas all over and I am starting to get worry.

I respect religions as long as theirs believes are not taking away mine.





TextRussell told council members he hears from 10 to 15 people each year asking him to ban Baker's Halloween celebration. "People don't like it," he said


It most be a very small town when 10 to 15 people is going to take views of the rest of the population of that town.



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:18 PM
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Vincent described Halloween as a satanic celebration and said that honoring it on any day of the week is wrong.


Wow, talk about an ignorant and uninformed statement. I wonder what other holidays they would like to remove or otherwise adjust to their desires. Would they just cut out the normal trick-or-treat stuff for possibly restrict any non-christian activites? I know many pagans who enjoy having Samhain celebrations and get-togethers.


LL1

posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:18 PM
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Did hear they want to change the date from Sunday.

Halloween



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:25 PM
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Next thing you know these radical christians are going to change the other holidays and add new ones to their liking. lol



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:44 PM
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I find it funny coming out of Louisiana...

I mean, have you ever been to New Orleans during Halloween?

I think it's more fun then Mardi Gras.

Now that I think about it, no wonder they want to ban it!



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:48 PM
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I see everybody feels very strongly about retaining Halloween, could someone please explain what it is celebrating? In the country I was born we don't celebrate halloween or for that matter understand the concept of halloween. Now that I live in New York City it appears that it is an occasion for women to dress sluttily, kids to get candy, and men to dress like ghosts and goblins and ghouls and to party?

Am I missing the bigger picture? if not what is the protest really about?



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 06:53 PM
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Originally posted by American Mad Man
I find it funny coming out of Louisiana...

I mean, have you ever been to New Orleans during Halloween?

I think it's more fun then Mardi Gras.

Now that I think about it, no wonder they want to ban it!


You know I may desagree with you on more than one issue but on this one I agree with you, it is funny and you are right probably they have been working on that for quite a while already but it brings to much revenue anually to eleminated it.



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by Mynaeris
In the country I was born we don't celebrate halloween or for that matter understand the concept of halloween. Am I missing the bigger picture? if not what is the protest really about?

Our celebration of Halloween harkens back to the Celtic New Year and the season of Samhain, which occurs on the eve of November 1st.
The ancient Celts divided the year into four quarters: Samhain (the winter quarter), Imbolc (the spring quarter), Beltane (the summer quarter), and Lughnasadh (the autumn quarter). Unlike the Gregorian calendar, the Celtic year began in November, with Samhain. The Celts were influenced mostly by the lunar and stellar cycles that ruled the agricultural year - which begins and ends in late autumn when the crops have been harvested and the soil is prepared for the winter.

Samhain not only marks the beginning of the Winter Quarter -it also marks the beginning of the dark half of the year.

Literally, it means "summer's end". The ancient, wandering Celts marked their ceremonies by the stars and it is believed that the Celtic "day" began at sunset, thereby reinforcing the influence the moon and stars had on the culture. Hence, the Celtic New Year celebration would begin each year on the Eve of November 1st. The atmosphere of the eve of Samhain is one of introspection and ancestral communion. The Celts believed that the doorway between this world and the otherworld was especially thin on the eve of Samhain. During this time, it was believed that fairies and the spirits of those who have died were able to come back to our realm and trick humans into getting entrapped in the fairy mounds where they would be lost forever. Sometimes people got into the spirit of things by playing tricks on each other as well.

When the Roman Empire reached Celtic lands, they added their own feast of the dead to Samhain. The Christians reassigned the meaning of Samhain to honor the saints, as All Saint's Day on November 1st. They also named October 31 as All Hollow's Eve. Although using different nomenclatures, all of these festivals and feasts are celebrating the accessibility, veneration, awe, and respect of the dead.

Many of our modern-day Halloween traditions have their roots in these ancient rituals. In order to ward off spirits, candles were placed in hollowed-out and carved turnips, the forerunner of our (pumpkin) jack-o-lanterns. The carvings were to scare away spirits that might mean you harm, while the candle's flame would invite those spirits that know you to come closer. The wearing of costumes or donning clothing of the opposite sex was a popular means of tricking the spirits as well. A few rituals have contributed to the fun of trick or treating. The custom of "soul-caking" was when children would go from door to door around the village, begging for cakes and in return would pray for the souls of the dearly departed. It was also believed that this was not a night to be alone, so villagers would go door to door collecting food for a community feast. In the center of the Celtic Otherworld is an apple tree of magical powers. Old stories tell of crossing the sea to reach the magical apple tree- this could be the origin of our Halloween tradition of bobbing for apples.

The Celts believed in a cyclical timeline, wherein the ending is also a beginning and the night of Samhain, All Hallow's Eve, exists on a point outside of normal time. Divination and superstitions are part and parcel of Samhain, with many rituals existing to tell the future. With so much mysticism shrouding the festival, Samhain - or Halloween - remains one of our magical holidays that still incorporates the ancient flavor of its origins. Happy New Year! It is one of, if not the, biggest holidays for us...........



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:16 PM
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Thanks for the backgrounder on Halloween LadyV. I understand its a Celt thing but it is not really celebrated only by the Irish in the US? So what signoificance is it to others, in other former British colonies with the exception of Canada it is not celebrated at all. Even in England it is vitually unknown. Wouldn't there be a more American celebration that should be the biggest celebration? Maybe something with more of a native american flovor? Sorry to play devil's advoicate but most supporters of halloween see it as a night of dressing up and trick or treating.



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:20 PM
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Good Job Louisiana! I ahve never let my kids celebrate it.


LL1

posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:22 PM
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Every year NYC has celebrated like this:

Halloween In NYC Village Style

Excellent explanation LadyV!



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:26 PM
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Louisiana seems to have been left behind.

Anything for that extra vote right.



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:27 PM
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The best Halloween parade I ever had was when my husband was station in Hawaii it was crazy we were young and we just went to Waikiki and have the best time of our lives.


LL1

posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:31 PM
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Did your children ever ask to go trick-or-treating with their friends?
How did you handle this with the schools that they attend?



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:42 PM
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I'm not Christian or belong to any faith Abrahamic henceforth, but, i still celebrate halloween; it's a fun time for me, still a kid, to go out and bully others for better chocolates !

lol.

You may call it Satanic, but the economy states otherwise ! I'm sure the all mighty WalMart will have something to say about this.

Deep



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 07:44 PM
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Originally posted by Mynaeris
Thanks for the backgrounder on Halloween LadyV. I understand its a Celt thing but it is not really celebrated only by the Irish in the US?


I'm sorry...I should of elaborated a bit here...when I said, "It's one of "our" biggest holidays, I meant "us" as in Wiccans.....not the U.S....I think for people in the us that are not Wiccan....it's just a fun night to dress up and let the kids get candy.....as far as dressing up like sluts...that depends on where you hang out and where you are for the night...



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 08:36 PM
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First, I am so embarrassed to be from Louisiana.

Second, I did a bit of research since I have never heard of Baker, LA. It has a population of approximately 14,000 and is located in East Baton Rouge Parish (we have parishes, not counties). LSU is 6 miles away. I could see if they are worried that the college crowd might get out of control but how do you cancel Halloween? How do you explain to your 5 year old he can't go door to door dressed like spider man getting candy corn? (The ULTIMATE Halloween candy!) Instead of "cancelling" Halloween, why don't they encourage All Saint's Day on November 1, when you go to the cementary and clean the graves? I don't know where people get their warped ideas from down here.



posted on Oct, 16 2004 @ 10:01 PM
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The warped ideas come from ignorant people that have no understanding of FUN and the healthy benefits from a little harmless scare. They prefer to retreat to their closeted benches and pray to some Jewish fella while at the same time putting Jews down. They pray to God to stop crimes while they themselve commit crimes everyday. You know who I mean!

Halloween has migrated beyond the scope of Religion, it is an outgrowth of all the Harvest Festivals and pre-winter celebrations ... you know ... those fun things that some people praying on a little bench in a closet never seem to appear at? (how they manage to have kids is beyond me!)




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