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NEWS: Al-Sadr Considers Move Into the Iraqi Political Arena

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posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 05:37 PM
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Shiite cleric Moktada al-Sadr known to have the blood of American forces and Iraqis alike on his hands, leader of his own radical militia and seen as a top enemy to U.S. forces in Iraq, is now concidering disbanding his militia and moving into Iraqi Politics. A move that could bring a whole new meaning to "Democracy" in this now war torn nation...
 





mathaba.net..." target="_blank" class="postlink">Mathaba.net Full Article

The Shiite cleric Moktada al-Sadr has begun laying the groundwork to enter Iraq's nascent democratic process, telling Iraqi leaders that he is planning to disband his militia and possibly field candidates for office.

After weeks of watching his militia wither before American military attacks, Mr. Sadr has sent emissaries to some of Iraq's major political parties and religious groups to discuss the possibility of involving himself in the campaign for nationwide elections, according to a senior aide to Mr. Sadr and several Iraqi leaders who have met with him.

According to those Iraqis, Mr. Sadr says he intends to disband his militia, the Mahdi Army, and endorse the holding of elections. While Mr. Sadr has made promises to end his armed resistance before, some Iraqi officials believe that he may be serious this time, especially given the toll of attacks on his forces.

Mr. Sadr's aides say his political intentions have been endorsed by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the country's most powerful Shiite religious leader. He has long tried to tame what he believes is Mr. Sadr's destructive influence on the chances of Iraq's Shiites to win a majority in the elections scheduled for January.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Welcome to the new Iraq!

President Moktada al-Sadr ?

Can democracy work for the enemies of freedom in Iraq?

A militant leader with blood on his hands, Now wants to enter politics. Perhaps by force and fear he could win.

What is even more shocking is that al-Sadr has been endorsed by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the country's most powerful Shiite religious leader.

We wanted them to have a Free and democratic nation. Welcome to politics in a majority muslim nation.

Related Links:

Sadr takes tentative steps toward political participation

Radical cleric Sadr may take part in polls

A view from the past, Former ATSNN News/Discussions Related to al-Sadr:

Al-Sadr inspires opposing rallies

Al-Sadr Tells Militia to Turn Over Shrine

Moqtada al-Sadr Reported Injured in Siege of Najaf

Iraq peace mission falls through

Thousands of Iraqis Protest U.S. Assault on Najaf

[edit on 3-10-2004 by UM_Gazz]



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 05:43 PM
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Well it wont be the first time in history that someone has used fear, assasanation, and other horrible means to influence votes of not only the people, but or the other leaders of the nation. And I agree, he just might make it work for him self. It is truely a pitty that it seems some people just cant handle freedom.



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 06:05 PM
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This is the best thing that could happen, and the worst all at the same time.
On one hand Al-Sadr's participation in Iraq's political process may lend it the credibility that it needs in the eyes of Iraqis. If someone with his background can participate in elections, certainly they could be viewed as free and fair.

On the other hand, should he be allowed to field a political party, and they gain a large majority of representatives in the Iraqi governement they could shape the future of Iraq as that of an Islamic republic similar to Iran. Given his close relationship with Iran, I have no doubt that Iran would back Sadr and his possible future political ambitions.
So rather then creating the Islamic democracy that one would hope for, Iraq could become a carbon copy of Iran, and the old Afghanistan.



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 06:19 PM
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What can I said, how democratic can Iraq be if their candidates for election are US approved and not Iraqi, I don't see it, Iraq belongs to the Iraqi people not to the bush or the poppet PM Iraq has now "US FDA" approved.

What US is going to do? reject any other candidate because opposed the occupation? How about the Iraqi people what do they want has anybody taken them into consideration?

I think that the coming elections in Iraq are going to be a joke and the people is going to oppose them and whoever becomes the next PM, and we all know who US wants.

If the peopel of Iraq wants Al-Sadr well that is their choice, no ours.



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 06:44 PM
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He wouldn't be the first poacher to turn gamekeeper.

If they put down their guns to take part in the system then that has to be good.

Ofcourse, it remains to be seen how quickly he would return to his old ways if he is rejected by the mainstream Iraqis, and secondly, if he is adopted, how would he abuse his position.

It's easy to be high and mighty here in the West, but you don't have to look too far into our past to see the blood on our hands.



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 07:25 PM
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Iran is another example of democracy gone bad in the Middle East.

There are some experts who believe that in time Iraq too will be much like Iran. Dominated by radical Shiites.

Perhaps even more radical than the Ayatollahs of Iran?

We cannot bring democracy to this nation of Iraq and expect it to have our own desired results.

It could be that one day a "free and democratic Iraq" will be more dangerous than it was under the former regime of Saddam.



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 10:05 PM
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al-Sadr, if he actually runs, has a good chance of winning. He can unite the Shiites, Sunnis, Kurds, and all the disaffected with his anti-American platform. His first order of business would be to oust the Americans, and you can bet that would be a campaign promise that he would keep. And we can forget about reaping the spoils of war in sweet construction deals, low oil prices, and the creation of an ally, but we could feel good about the fact that we brought democracy to yet another satisfied nation at the bargain price of 1000 lives and $200 billion dollars. Ouch.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
nytimes.com...



posted on Oct, 4 2004 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by marg6043
What can I said, how democratic can Iraq be if their candidates for election are US approved and not Iraqi, I don't see it, Iraq belongs to the Iraqi people not to the bush or the poppet PM Iraq has now "US FDA" approved.

What US is going to do? reject any other candidate because opposed the occupation? How about the Iraqi people what do they want has anybody taken them into consideration?

I think that the coming elections in Iraq are going to be a joke and the people is going to oppose them and whoever becomes the next PM, and we all know who US wants.

If the peopel of Iraq wants Al-Sadr well that is their choice, no ours.


What exactly are you talking about? Little will change if Kerry gets elected. The ideas he's suggested so far for the war in Iraq and the "war on terror" sound almost exactly like what Bush is doing right now. The expansion of the U.S. and western culture has little to do with who our president is, and has everything to with with us being the world's only hyper-power.

We are going to do what is in our and our allies' best interest. Historically, this is the way that civilization works. You may think that it's evil, but compare us to some of your other super-power options... I wonder what you'd be saying right now if say... the U.S. had lost the Cold War. Wait!... that's right, you probably wouldn't be saying anything at all! You'd be too afraid to express your opinions because the Soviet Union would be the ones spreading their influence across the globe and in that reality, expressing one's opinions might be hazardous to the health lol. I don't think I even need to comment on what the world would be like if the Allies had lost WWII.

Any other country were in our position would probably behave in a worse manner. France, Britain, Spain, Russia, China and many others have a long history of oppressing other peoples... not just the US. It seems like your problem shouldn't be with the US but with the human race.

On topic... If he gains control of Iraq, so be it. We can just go back in in another ten years and remove him as well lol.

edits for grammatical errors

[edit on 4-10-2004 by veritas93]

[edit on 4-10-2004 by veritas93]




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