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Recurve Bow

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posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 08:47 AM
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I have been looking for a Recurve Bow for a while now but I feel like I need to get to grips with one before I buy, so I wanted some advice from people with knowledge of archery to see if this is needed or could I just get one straight up from the internet? I imagine that because of my height (6"5') the length of the bow will be critical for me, so I kindly ask for some all around advice on purchasing a solid, but not too expensive Recurve Bow for someone my height.

Thankyou in advance,

Dionisius.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 08:49 AM
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Good luck. Been looking for one for a decade now. They're rarer than hen's teeth.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


Go to a local archery shop since you are above average height, as I am. You need the proper bow for your draw length, and the proper arrow length and spine for the bow. Too short of a bow and you'll overdraw and mess it up.
Get at least 55-65 lb. draw weight if you intend to hunt. If they try to poke your eyes out on the equipment:

This place has recurves and longbows

Bear and PSE are both excellent. I used to have a youth Fred Bear recurve and let it go. I regret it.

Also look at longbows as an alternative, some of them are great for tall people.
edit on 20-11-2011 by 1SawSomeThings because: add info.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 09:12 AM
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I wanted to learn to shoot a recurve or longbow, I got a compound bow now, love it

BowTech FTW



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by HomerinNC
 


I considered Compound but they have too many different components that would be near impossible to repair or replace in the field or in a survival sit.

ETA: and as USarmyFL has pointed out you cant make your own arrows, not great for survival.


reply to post by 1SawSomeThings
 


Thanks for the advice, I dont have a local Archery store that I know of but there is a local club which I have thought of joining, that could be a good place to delve into finding a nice bow for my height.

Ill look into Fred Bear as well, I havent heard of that make.
edit on 20-11-2011 by Dionisius because: because i can



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 09:56 AM
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But for survival a compound would be a bad idea. More things to go wrong and you cant shoot homemade wooden arrows with a compound. (or not supposed to anyway).


U
edit on 20-11-2011 by USarmyFL because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 10:35 AM
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I will second the opinion on Fred Bear. Grips better than most pistols to be honest. But be prepared to part with some serious cash.

For any bow, (long, recurve, mongolian horse bow) always deal with a local archery shop in person and take the time to be fitted with a bow. Draw length is everything. While you can adapt to a slightly shorter or longer draw length, you should not have to do so as that has a direct effect on the poundage, which in turn has an affect on the arrows.

If you think some guns are picky about the ammo you feed them, changing the the poundage and draw length on the arrow will destroy your accuracy. Not as big of a deal on large target like a deer at close ranges. But as the target becomes smaller or farther away, it is the difference between eating or at the very least recovering the arrow.

Archery is a skill that has to be worked and constantly practiced. It has been more than 10 years since I shot competition and I figure it would take over 100 hours of practice over a 2-3 month period to even remotely return to what I would consider acceptable to where I left off. At this point I would suspect that my draw mechanics are so off that my left wrist will be cherry red within 30 minutes.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


At 6'5'' you will have a long draw length(the length between the handle of the bow and the string,when an arrow is drawn back fully).

Measure your draw length without a bow by standing as if you are drawing a bow,with one arm out with a fist,and the other on your chosen anchor point(chin/jaw).
The distance between both fists is your draw length.
Get a bow which is capable of your draw length.

Example-My draw length is approx 85cm or 33.5inches.And my draw weight tops out at 80lb of force,after years of training.
So I got a bow capable of this.
I have a lot of bows,some home made some bought.
I have worked my way up to the Kassi Bear,75lb draw weight @ 33 inches.
Its an utter beast.
Accurate,durable,and hand crafted by a master of ancient bow making.
The guy recreates these bow from remains they dig out of ancient mongolian/hungarian tombs.
And he is good at his craft.

Being horse bows,they are often a lot shorter than say an English longbow-but they have one hell of a good draw length for their size,and won't let you down for decades if you look after it properly.

Her is a link to my bow:


www.hunarchery.com...


Have fun,and shop around-Try to hold the bow you choose before you buy-And never buy second hand unless you can inspect it first.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 12:07 PM
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I have a left handed recurve bow, that is nearly 5 feet. too bad it's a lefty cause I'm a righty. been trying to look for a right hand ever since.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


I've heard good things about the brand Bear. My first brand was made by them. You may want to consider starting off with the bow you intend to use as your first bow. A compound and a recurve bow are very different, and beyond the basic act of shooting it's not going to do much to make you good with the other, if you decide to the more sophisticated type.

Re-curve can teach some bad habits actually. You can't tilt a compound bow while sighting it, so be aware that the re-curve may hurt your skill if you develop that habit.
edit on 20-11-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by Ahabstar
I will second the opinion on Fred Bear. Grips better than most pistols to be honest. But be prepared to part with some serious cash.

For any bow, (long, recurve, mongolian horse bow) always deal with a local archery shop in person and take the time to be fitted with a bow. Draw length is everything. While you can adapt to a slightly shorter or longer draw length, you should not have to do so as that has a direct effect on the poundage, which in turn has an affect on the arrows.

If you think some guns are picky about the ammo you feed them, changing the the poundage and draw length on the arrow will destroy your accuracy. Not as big of a deal on large target like a deer at close ranges. But as the target becomes smaller or farther away, it is the difference between eating or at the very least recovering the arrow.

Archery is a skill that has to be worked and constantly practiced. It has been more than 10 years since I shot competition and I figure it would take over 100 hours of practice over a 2-3 month period to even remotely return to what I would consider acceptable to where I left off. At this point I would suspect that my draw mechanics are so off that my left wrist will be cherry red within 30 minutes.




Some good stuff there Aba, but bowmanship is, once picked up, like riding a bike


It's good fitness too!



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


Oh, I am sure I would hit the paper target stil (somewhere)l. But back when I was still shooting, I wouldn't even count a round unless I had 28 of 30 at 20 yards or if I fired less than 7 arrows in the 30 sec speed round.

Rounds were 6 arrows at 20, 30 and 40 yards plus a 30 sec speed round at 20 yards. Gold was worth 5 points and stepped down from there. Maximum scores was 90 plus however well you did at the speed round. When I quit I was averaging 72 with a personal best of 98.

Style was traditional wood shaft, no sights, no stabilizers and only a single nock bead. It was fun. I was using an old Bear Grizzly pulling about 72 lbs at 31 inches but usually short pulled 29.5 to 30 inches at 67 lbs. Yes, it was a sloppy style but at 20 yards I would just instinctive shoot anyway, hence the relaxed draw. But I would full draw and aim at 30 and 40. The bow itself was rated 65 lbs at 28 inches.



posted on Nov, 20 2011 @ 11:32 PM
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For your very first bow you should go to a shop and try the sizes but more importantly weight. Get a bow that has a draw weight that is very easy to use. Don't go for the maximum at first. Get an easy bow and then practice the mechanics of shooting first. Then upgrade to what ever is your ideal weight. Or you could join a club where they allow you to use their bows for learning.



posted on Nov, 21 2011 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by gunshooter
 


Well I am a leftie. Would you be willing to part with your bow for next to nothing?



posted on Nov, 21 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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Thanks for the advice guys, really appreciated.


I'll be joining my local Archery Club to try out different bows and try and get an intermediate bow for cheap.



posted on Nov, 22 2011 @ 09:17 AM
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These posters are dead on. I hunted my first two archery seasons with my mothers Bear long bow and I was much too small for it. the lower limb was about 4- 5 inches off the ground and i had a devil of a time stringing it. That and two arrows. I got a doe and spike for the two seasons. If you want to enough you can adapt to any equipment.

But having equipment adapted to you is golden and worth every penny. Its a long term investment so dont be afraid of the price tags when the equipment is customized for you.

oh. if you dont want to hunt your second season with one arrow because the other was broken by the game in the first......buy up a few dozen of those perfectly matched arrows over time. they can pile up and they dont eat anything.



posted on Nov, 25 2011 @ 01:27 AM
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Good thread. Flagged.

Funny I was thinking of getting a recurve bow myself. Traditional, low maintenance, and I would think just as effective at killing game. They may not be as quiet, but I did see some online with the 2 silencers(whatever they may be called IDK)

Also looking online, I think you could get a decent one for 150 bucks (maybe, correct me if I am Wrong) but I would still go to archery shop and find one for my draw length. Although, unlike compounds, I believe you don't need to have the draw length perfect. Compounds with all there moving part need to be fully drawn back in order to work proper, recurves you could get away with a little more.



posted on Feb, 5 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 

Dionisius:
Perhaps I can help. I've been shooting an Olympic-style recurve bow for about four years. Over the past year, I decided to get trained and certified as a Basic Archery Instructor under USA Archery and the National Field Archery Association. I've had the pleasure of instructing kids in scouting and church-sponsored functions. Archery, particularly target archery, is a blast and can be carried over to hunting (if you're into that) or as a survival skill. Below are my inputs, some of which may have been covered somewhat by other posters.

Since you've been looking into recurve bows, you have probably seen that they come either as a 1-piece unit or a 3-piece "takedown" type that is preferred since you can store the bow in a smaller case. Of the takedown recurves, removable upper and lower bow limbs can be tailored to your needed AMO length and draw weight (AMO - - Archery Manufacturer and Merchants Organization, now the ATA, i.e. Archery Trade Association). Of this type, there are target and hunting recurves with bolt-on limbs. Other, more expensive takedown recurves used in Olympic target archery, have removable limbs featuring standardized International Limb Fittings (ILFs) that are compatible across different ILF recurve bow makers. Right now, you probably want to start with at lower-priced takedown recurve with bolt-on limbs.

You mentioned the need to find a long enough recurve to match your long draw length, being a tall guy. My recommendation is for you to consider getting a takedown recurve that is no shorter than 68" AMO length, preferrably 70" AMO length (AMO length, I understand, is not actual recurve length, but rather the bowstring length minus 3"-4"). The longer bow length is not only to avoid bow poundage stacking, but more importantly to minimize "finger pinch" at the arrow drawing hand due to the bowstring angle being too acute, given shorter bows. Finger pinch can become painful after a few hours of shooting, but it also prevents one from achieving a clean arrow release, which in turn adversely affects shooting accuracy. Even three fingers below the arrow nock, and a leather finger tab or shooting glove, don't really help against finger pinch. A 70" AMO length recurve is what you need.

I have found decent 70" AMO length takedown recurves for you by the manufacturer Ragim (bought out by G&H Outdoors?) called the Matrix and the Matrix Custom. If archery/bowhunting pro-shops are in your area, it is good for beginners to go check out these places for a bow. However, as an alternative, you can find/buy good bows online from reputable dealers. Look up "Ye Olde Archery Shoppe" at yeoldearcheryshoppe.com. In the Traditional Bows section is listed the Ragin Matrix and Matrix Custom (I like the Matrix Custom's lighter-stained handle riser). Please ignor all of the other pretty recurves; they are really too short for your needs.

The next topic to consider is the bow draw weight. When first starting archery with a recurve bow, whether it is for target or even hunting, learning the correct shooting technique is paramount. Sometimes, beginning archers get outfitted with a bow that is too difficult for them to comfortably draw (get "overbowed"), and thus they pick up improper shooting postures that can result in injuries and/or really turn them off from archery. While I don't really know how muscular you are, in general my advice is for you to consider getting 30# to 35# limbs for a 70" AMO length Ragin Matrix or Custom Matrix. As you may know, 30# limbs are rated for a standardized 28" arrow draw length. So, with your extended draw length, the actual poundage could be near 35#, and 35# limbs @ 28" for you could actually be near 40#, which is powerful enough for now. Given lighter poundage limbs, you need to be capable of comfortably drawing back to your cheek or jawbone and anchoring there for at least 2 seconds to set/aim before releasing. My gut-feel advice for you is to start with 30#-rated limbs to first develop your shooting form, and then later (or when you buy the bow) also purchase a pair of 35# to 40# limbs to swap out as your form is established and strength grows. If you start with higher poundage limbs above 40#, I am afraid that you will be overbowed and become very disappointed.

You'll also need to be outfitted with proper length arrows per your extended draw length, with arrow shaft spine per your actual bow poundage. You'll need to take the bow into an archery pro-shop for this, remembering that if/when you change to heavier limbs, you will need upgraded arrows. Websites listed have armguards and finger tabs. You'll also need a nock point crimped onto your bowstring, aligned with an arrow.

Another highly recommended archery supply dealer:
Lancaster Archery --> lancasterarchery.com (Lancaster, PA; have actual brick & morter store)


Best wishes,

MaxQFlight



posted on Feb, 5 2012 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


Dionisius,

I forgot to also mention that, unless you have already done this, before you buy a bow it is a good idea to do one of the various forms of "eye dominance" checks to determine your aiming eye and thus your "bow hand" (i.e. bow hand-ness is the hand that pulls back the arrow, not the hand that holds the bow). Please Google "eye dominance" and perhaps "archery" for instructions. Just because a person may write or throw a ball right-handed does not necessarily mean that person should shoot a bow right-handed if his aiming eye is the left eye. I heard stories of beginning archers that got extremely frustrated because they never hit the target, only to find out later that they were not checked for eye dominance and were given a wrong-handed bow (really). I am left-hand dominant, but because my right eye is dominant, I choose to go with right-handed bows. I feel more steady holding the bow with my dominant left hand/arm and simply anchoring the arrow nock along my right jawbone.

Take care,

MaxQFlight



posted on Feb, 6 2012 @ 04:42 AM
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reply to post by USarmyFL
 


What is the bow of choice? I am looking to buy one.



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