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Bug out Bag ideas and tips

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posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 11:02 AM
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What goes in these things anyways? I decided to look for a guide about how to make one, and found out just how useless a real bug out bag is. It's only for a 72 hour excursion? What's the point? I can live for 72 hours with my two feet and weather appropriate clothing. I decided not to build a bug out bag at all after finding that out, and decided on something I'll dub my survival bag.

I've been buying things for this bag lately, but it's still far from complete. I decided to put forth some guidelines for packing it.

One, is that I want to get the most use of each item that I'm carrying, at the least amount of weight and size. I've decided to go for universal style things, and do something I've come up with that I call "down packing". There's no point in carrying all the packaging and carry totes that nearly everything comes with nowadays right? Right, so I've been taking them apart and using other solid objects to house them. Example, I took the universal gun cleaning kit that I bought, and wrapped the items up in a rag and stuffed them in a piece of cookware. I've packaged each item inside another, and now lost a bit of weight. Another example, I bought a small "mess kit" for eating, and put my fire starting materials, fishing hooks/sinkers/swivels and such in plastic bags inside it. Saves myself a tackle box, keeps everything safe, and gives me something to eat the fish with.

Another way to get the most from each item, is to buy things with accessories. The military loves this thinking. A soldier doesn't just have one pair of boots for all weather, he has galoshes that pack up easily, and will keep his feet dry in the rain and slush as well. Being as dry feet are key to survival, I'm going to follow that thinking and get some galoshes to pack away in my bag. Likewise nearly every other thing a soldier wears can easily convert to another purpose or be incorporated into something else.

Breathable rain wear is another thing I'm packing. I know it might seem like a waste of space, but where I live further south, a snow storm is wet, and being out in one for a few hours can result in you being soaked from the falling snow which is little more than sleet. Breathable rain wear as your outer most layer with your normal clothes and some sweats underneath is a great way to insulate until temps get down to below 20. Getting soaked all day, is a bad idea when the temps at night can drop very quickly. Anything lower than that, and you need a parka and insulated pants, which is also something I'm packing.

I've heard of people planning ahead for radiation exposure with potassium iodine pills, but I've prepared for the most basic of survival danger, the common cold. It's not good to be sick when trying to survive. Lacking the ability to walk long distances or find food could make the common cold starve you to death. Add to it that you may not be bathing all that regularly, and you'll want a strong immune system. I've packed some garlic pills to ensure my immune system is strong.

An obvious survival staple is a gun of some sort. I'll be using a very simple rifle and carrying a variety of ammo to ensure I'm prepared. I'm considering what I can do to keep the ammo dry, such as shrink wrapping it. Not sure if that's a good idea being as that requires heat which is bad around gun powder.


Baking soda and tooth brushes! That's right, I packed those too. Baking soda kills plaque, and the tooth brush is obviously for brushing your teeth. Trying to eat foraged food without teeth would be difficult at best.

That's all I have done at the moment. Hopefully I gave you some ideas you had not thought of before. I have to get to work on my survival bag, but it's a decent start.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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Bug out bags are differ with what the individual think he/she will need in order to survive SHORT TERM emergency situations, or to assist him/her in achieving a more long term survival situation in the interim between the start of the emergency and the end.

It all depends on where you're going and why.

1. If you're going into the woods or the desert your bag should include water/water purification pills(you may still need to strain water through a filtration device. I suggest high thread count cotton or silk), a mess kit, MREs and power bars, warm clothes, sleeping bag/bivy tent, paracord/rope, fire starter(matches/flint+steel/lighters/kindling like dryer lint). You should have a knife/multitool, and if possible either a shotgun or a handgun. Last but certainly NOT least a comprehensive first aid kit and whatever drugs(for medicinal use only) you can get a hold of.

2. If the emergency is a military conflict you may want to make sure you have all of that PLUS a whole crap load of ammo(what you can carry and walk several miles with) and a decent combat rifle and pistol.

Those are just my suggestions, however. Your bag should be tailored to your needs and specific plan of action.
edit on 18-11-2011 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by Evolutionsend
What goes in these things anyways? I decided to look for a guide about how to make one, and found out just how useless a real bug out bag is. It's only for a 72 hour excursion? What's the point? I can live for 72 hours with my two feet and weather appropriate clothing. I decided not to build a bug out bag at all after finding that out, and decided on something I'll dub my survival bag.



I know what you mean there, my BOB is more of a long term survival bag as well rather than a 72 hour. I am trying to get together all the things I will need to spend an indefinete time in 'survival mode', the main thing I am acquiring is knowledge, more important than any equipment (except a knife
)

One thing I would recommend if you havent included already is a Gransfors Bruks or Estwing axe, depending on your preference. Also my personal favourite is the ESEE Lite Machete, it is an incredibly versatile tool that can also be used as an extremely effective and quite scary self defense weapon. My little tip for the ESEE is to sharpen the first 1 and a half to 2 inches as sharp as is possible so it can be used for whittling, cutting rope, chopping vegetables and meat, the list goes on.

Nice Thread



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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Maybe these will help you








edit on 18-11-2011 by Hellas because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


I did forget the knife didn't I?

You would think I might remember that with Semper always talking about his knife.

reply to post by Hellas
 


The second video has three knives, that's breaking my rule of having a do all motto for choosing items. No way I'll need three knives.
edit on 18-11-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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One must definitely pack their bag with the area in mind that they reside.

Case in point is, if you live in an Urban area now, your bag will contain different supplies than if you live rural.

Don’t think that if you do find yourself living in an Urban area today, that you will be able to leave without great difficulty. Just look at you normal rush hour traffic and how long your commute time is now. Just think about that and multiply that by a hundred fold, add a couple of accidents into the mix and friend you aren’t going anywhere.

One more thing to consider if you are planning to “head to the woods” in a SHTF event, the folks that already live there don’t want you and have prepared not to allow you to squat.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by brokedown
 


I'm a pretty avid mountain biker. I can leave any area that my bike will fit in a hurry.
Note to self, bring bike.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


yeah I was suprised you didnt include one, as Ray Mears says "Your Knife is your life"

Yeah im not so sure about 3 knives, I have 3 Sharpened Tools though - Bushcraft Knife, Small Axe and Machete. I would also recommend an ESEE Izula 2 and carry it around your neck at all times.

Another thing to add would be knowledge of Bow Making, It will be life saving when you run out of Bullets, unless you can carry around a Bullet press and now how to smelt



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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Myself - I would add a set of handcuffs. and some good rope. Not just because I'm a bondage freak, but because in a survival situation it might be prudent to be able to subdue an determined assailant. You can even disable two of them with one set of handcuffs.

I know - I'm paranoid.

But one thing I do know is that the gun would be for self defence and hunting. Self defence for me does not neccesarily entail killing a person.

I also have a small torch that has a wind up mechanism. It doesn't run low on batteries and in many situations extra light is absolutely perfect. Signalling being one of them.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


I'm not done yet, that's just what I have so far.


How about a "rope" saw and a hatchet rather than a small axe?
edit on 18-11-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


Could do, it depends on your situation, but i thought that breaks your rule?


Personally If I could only take one thing with me it would be my Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe. Its a complete package, has a 20 year guarantee and has too many uses to list. In my situation its more important than a knife but thats just me.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


I question how useful a small axe would be for any real wood cutting. Not that you would need to do any, but what's the point in having a small axe at all? A hatchet can bust up small wood which is what you would probably want for a fire.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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i keep 2 handy.
one is basic,
knife, pistol and ammo, half gal. water and filter, small first aid kit, couple days of dried food.

the other is the 50+ pounds of gear.
in a life and death situation, you do not want 50 pounds of gear on your back if being persued.
if you dump it to get away, your skrewed.
better off roughing it with a few basics.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 04:17 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


For me, the bug out bag is more about info and tools than food or drink. Better to know WHERE and HOW to get it, than to try and carry a lot with you.

A map with locations indicating good raiding spots and hold up areas...info on edible plants and wilderness survival...tools for opening cans, breaking and entering, building a shelter, a flashlight, some batteries, basic first aid kit, and a knife, and general camping supplies.

Packing light is the key. My previous BOB was a monstrous thing, built into one of those hiking backpacks with the frame, etc. That's a bit bulky to stick in the car, when almost 100% of the day, I'm within walking distance to my car, so it seems the best place to have it. I have the good folks at ATS to thank for helping me see the light of going with a smaller, lighter version.


An obvious survival staple is a gun of some sort. I'll be using a very simple rifle and carrying a variety of ammo to ensure I'm prepared. I'm considering what I can do to keep the ammo dry, such as shrink wrapping it. Not sure if that's a good idea being as that requires heat which is bad around gun powder


How about those Ziplock bags that use an air pump to remove the air from the bag? more like vacuum sealing than shrink wrapping with heat.



edit on 18-11-2011 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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2 best recommendations in this order.
6 pairs of socks and alot of duct tape.
Tape for the obvious reasons.
And socks because your feet are more important than any part of your body if you are to "survive", plus socks are useful for more than just feet.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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Originally posted by brokedown
One must definitely pack their bag with the area in mind that they reside.

Case in point is, if you live in an Urban area now, your bag will contain different supplies than if you live rural.

Don’t think that if you do find yourself living in an Urban area today, that you will be able to leave without great difficulty. Just look at you normal rush hour traffic and how long your commute time is now. Just think about that and multiply that by a hundred fold, add a couple of accidents into the mix and friend you aren’t going anywhere.

One more thing to consider if you are planning to “head to the woods” in a SHTF event, the folks that already live there don’t want you and have prepared not to allow you to squat.


IMO if you live in an Urban area or City you are better up to stock up the house and stay put rather than bug out. If the shtf you shut yourself in and wait it out. Your actually able to hide better if their are hundreds of apts and what not around.
And you're so right brokedown- people who already live in woods have no tolerence for squatters from the city if they have nothing to bring to the table. Those people have already made a plan for that. Unprepared will be in for a big surprise.

My BOB is always packed and ready, especially for natural disaster. I already learned how important that was when I was forced to leave my house at 2 am in the middle of the massive 2009 ice storm up north. Trees fell on my house (it ended up being torn down, that's how bad it was) and I had an 8 mile walk in glare ice and freezing rain, trees and powerlines smashing down around me the whole walk to town. It was the scariest thing I have ever been through and the only comfort I had was that my winter gear was well thought out and I had proper shelter if I needed it. Had I not been prepared I would have frozen to death.
On the upside, I have a new little cottage.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


Fair point, but a longer axe has more uses than just cutting wood, an axe can be used for breaking and entry, wrecking a shelter, or building one, carving game, self defense weapon or even as a hunting weapon if you have the skill (cant imagine there are many people with that skill but you never know
) if needed for smaller tasks you can 'choke' the handle and use for whittling and finer tasks that you would use a knife for.

An Axe is a Mans best friend



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 12:57 AM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


You really thinking on this eh, but so far from what I have seen. A bug out bag though useful still would not be much but a lot of weight to carry around, and possibly an arrow pointing to you as being a target by everybody and anybody you would come across. And really all they would need is a weapon, and sooner or latter they would have your stuff that you so carefully planed on carrying around. At least if it came down to actually needing a bug out bag, well then you would not be the only one.

Though I would say pack or bring some building tools such as one of them little axes for chopping wood, and a saw, and also some flint or another long lasting way to make a fire....Because trust you me, you would not be going far before you would be thinking of a place to set down or set up for the night, or possibly the week, or the month, or the year, etc etc.

But I like your Idea of minimizing weight by packaging things that you would use in other thing you would use. Or you can always go find a horse somewhere to carry all that extra weight for you, after all horses have been used by humans for thousands of years and even today. And before they got domesticated, really humans didn't not get far, or move much beyond there little communities/tribes and hunting ranges.

In fact most were surprised when they went over the next hill only to find other people beyond them there hills.
Such was the extent of ancient mans travels, always being surprised by the other strangers beyond the next hill. And hill by hill they eventually became tribes and villages, and eventually small cities. etc, etc.

To tell you the truth I never got this whole bug out bag thing, there are just so many situations were there would be pros and cons to having one around. But there is definitely more pro to having one around then con. However if it ever came down to a SHTF situation. I confess that I would try to fit my PS3 into that bag. And I would spend a good time of my wanderings looking for a TV and some sort of power station to plug it into.


Then all I would need is a truck load of Twinkies and I would be set for a long while.



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 01:32 AM
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A bug out bag is usually only designed for 72 hours because it is only meant to help you get out of the danger area and into a predetermined bug out location where you should already have more supplies.

Normally people will include some basic items such as:
- MREs or Freeze Dried Food.
- Bottled Water
- Iodine
- Basic First Aid supplies (Quick Clot, Tourniquets, bandages)
- A Mirror
- Fire Starter
- Map
- Compass
- Knife

Things of that nature. Now if you want to survive longer, you are going to need to stay light but pack more.

For example, when selecting a firearm for hunting or self defense, you would probably want to go with something like a Kel-Tec PMR-30 pistol which uses 30-round mags and is chambered for the .22mag round. Or a folding rifle like the Kel-Tec Sub-2000. Plus the ammo is cheap and you can carry plenty of it.

When it comes to getting wood for fire, you don't exactly need logs. You can use a small pocket saw to cut thick low hanging branches. It's far less weight than carrying an axe, hatchet or machete.

About a hundred feet of paracord is something I also recommend. It's strong, durable and can be used for whatever you need. Hanging a deer, replacing a shoelace, tying up a makeshift shelter, etc.

A good folding shovel is also recommended. Along with some toilet paper. You will thank yourself later.



posted on Nov, 19 2011 @ 02:56 AM
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you might want to rearrange a little..
wouldnt recomend putting weapons cleaning equipment in cooking equipment weapons cleaning oil not that tasty and cause problems if ingested...

Also unless your using black powder modern ammunition will still function after exposure to water. Modern ammunition can even function underwater - seen it done with an old government model .45
edit on 19/11/11 by Expat888 because: tengu mischief




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