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Why did NASA choose white for spacesuits?

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posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:32 PM
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I wanted to ask that question for over a week now but i just never got to because of all the other stuff that was going on...plus sometimes i forget what i want to ask..but anyways i want to know why did they choose that particular color? when it is the most reflective aside from mirrors or metallic objects...





posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by ApplesOnFire
 



when it is the most reflective aside from mirrors or metallic objects...


Probably for that very reason..Reflecting heat etc..

Also I'd say it wouldn't be good to use dyes to color suits..



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:35 PM
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In the old days of the Mercury program, they took ordinary flight suits and spray painted them silver. Why? Because they looked cooler, man! The space program has pretty much always been about public relations and patriotic drum beating.


P.S. -- White makes it look like they're doing something highly important and scientific that requires high levels of cleanliness and precision, like a doctor or scientist. Not just floating around in droplets of their own urine.
edit on 17-11-2011 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:44 PM
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The color white reflects more heat because white reflects most colors on the visible spectrum of light.

There is no color, therefore there is nothing to absorb.

Thread debunked.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:45 PM
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There is no shade in space, white is the most reflective color.

The only time I wear a cap is when I deep sea fish, and sometimes I put a white t-shirt inside to drape over my back to reduce exposure, there is no shade on a back of a deep sea fishing boat either.
edit on 17-11-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:49 PM
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You answered your own question. White reflects heat which would in turn make the coolers in the spacesuit more efficient, among other benefits. also what BlueShift said -- white makes em look sleek and important





posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:50 PM
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Most space craft and suits are white because they are easily seen in the darkness of space, imagine what an astronaut in a black suit would look against the blackness of space, or the space station... its common sense.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:50 PM
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reply to post by ApplesOnFire
 


I guess it's a standard color used for all space agencies. The Chinese EVA suit also is white.




posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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Better question, why were the thermal protective foam silica ceramic tiles on the space shuttle underbelly and, nose and forward wing edges BLACK instead of white like most of the rest of the shuttle's exterior, the trailing edges and surfaces most exposed to absorb the greatest of the reentry heat?



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 06:01 PM
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Maybe a better question, why was A. C. Clark's 2001 spacesuit red?

In the darkroom, red is black, its why on TV when you see a darkroom scene exposing film the light is red.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 06:01 PM
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a combination of reflective property, and public relations, and also sort of patriotic.

It isn't ALL white i'm sure there's some red white and blue on the uniform.

Also, if they were black it would just seem so secretive, i bet if they were black every conspiracy theorist would say they were down with the devil



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 06:17 PM
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The white has nothing to do with aesthetic values. Its science 101 stuff, and less expensive and more durable than mylar used on the lunar lander and other parts around the important electronics on space probes, only the mylar IS metal based mylar. You can cheaply buy the silver space blanket for camping and such. Its not real practical to have something so mirror-like reflective out there, white does it just fine without the sci fi impact movie crap. It's not white for visuals either, one has no problem in all of the reflective light in LEO and/or on the moon to see, even if you wore purple, which would be kinda dumb.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


They use 24k gold to cover the space craft so the IR radiation does not mess around with the equipment
i assume the white suits keep them from being cooked alive by the intense radiation



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 07:06 PM
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Originally posted by Blue Shift
In the old days of the Mercury program, they took ordinary flight suits and spray painted them silver. Why? Because they looked cooler, man! The space program has pretty much always been about public relations and patriotic drum beating.


P.S. -- White makes it look like they're doing something highly important and scientific that requires high levels of cleanliness and precision, like a doctor or scientist. Not just floating around in droplets of their own urine.
edit on 17-11-2011 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)


Yeah, you know what? I always wanted to be an astronaut but after googling the whole peeing in space thing and finding out you have to use a diaper. I think I might pass. I'm a bit too young/too old to start pooping myself.
I'm probably gonna stay on earth until I don't have dedicate in my own pants to get up there.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by ApplesOnFire
 




They use 24k gold to cover the space craft so the IR radiation does not mess around with the equipment


Nope. Well, yes and no...... The "gold" color you see on some components of the spacecraft (and some satellites) may or may not be gold....(could be anodized aluminum)....it is usually an metalicized Mylar film. Plastic film, actually as the link shows, "Mylar" is a brand name....it is a BoPET plastic.....same as used in those pretty birthday balloons.

The metal used depends on the equipment being protected, and the specific mission of the device. The gold, very thin, bonded to the plastic helps in reflecting IR, as you said....basically, to keep heat build-up to a minimum.

The Astronauts' EVA suit helmets also use the gold....they have a visor layer that can be slid down or up out of the way...it is gold-coated glass.



edit on Thu 17 November 2011 by ProudBird because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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I would have guessed because it makes it easier to detect contaminants and tears or whatever. Lab coats are white for that reason I believe. Also;



Good question OP!

Forgot to add that is one badass picture! I looked at it, cocked my head to the side and realized I looked like a slack jawed yokel!
edit on 17-11-2011 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 08:41 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


The tiles are black to permit to see damage and contrast with the surface they are attached to. The tiles have no problem with heat since the material is specifically designed as an insulation.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by Panic2k11
 


Black is the best colour to emit thermal radiation, so while these tiles will heat up quickly, they will radiate the heat away much quicker. The Spacesuit on the other hand, you don't want heating up at all so white is a good reflector. It will also not emit heat that has built up very well, so it would help maintain the temp within the suit for the Astronaut.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by ProudBird
 


Yes, real gold in the outer visor of the Apollo astronauts helmets, and since. I thought it was common knowledge, but I suppose a lot of folks never really looked at the visors outside of moon hoax photos, where it's not as noticeable.

reply to post by ApplesOnFire
 


There is some real truth that the cold in space takes a long time to change the temperature of a surface, even more time to change the temperature of a living body that produces its own heat, because there is no carrier, (air, water), but heat from solar rays are near instant, and that is what things are designed to protect things from the most, radiation. You hear how cold it is in space but with no air it really has no temperature. Direct solar rays require no air. Yes I said it, there really is no temperature in space, just don't touch your tongue to the light post.

reply to post by Panic2k11
 


The black indicates the addition of carbon.



posted on Nov, 18 2011 @ 02:40 AM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


they cover some space vehicles with that as well

what a waste.... i would steal the helmet and pawn it for $17,000




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