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Perception of Colours

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posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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Hi Everyone,

Something came up while i was going through some pictures of nature.

How do we know the colour we see is the same colour others see?

When i look at a purple glove(purple is just a word) i see a colour, and i was told that it was "purple" but how do i know that another person looking at the exact same glove see the colour im seeing? for them "purple" is actually looks like "pink"(my pink) but they were told that this is purple.

Can this type of perception affecting things we see everyday? like numbers designs etc.

Regards,
edit on 22-2-2014 by Kandinsky because: fixed typo in title



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by luciddream
 


google "do you see what I see" I believe it's a nova special, but not sure. Talks about exactly what you are saying and in fact, no, we don't all perceive colors the same.

color blindness is an example of this, but i think that's related to the eye missing components that determine color.

I have also seen a docu (maybe that same one) talking about this disease or brain disorder, that allows people to see certain words in colors. doug from weeds has this. For someone with this condition, the character 7 might always be the same shade of purple, regardless of the fact that it is, in reality, black ink.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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We're all inherently built the same pretty much so it's safe to assume, the red I see, is the red you see etc.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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I have always wondered if everyone perceived colors the same way. Years ago I looked into this but was unable to find any concrete research on the subject.

In the past I did a small experiment to see if people perceived white the same way. I had about 10 different people, including myself, look at a plain white board and write down what color they saw. Most wrote down white. But, a few people could see light hues of a wide array of colors on the board that they knew was white. Personally, I have always seen different colors in objects that are solid white. This is why I don't hang anything on my walls. The plain white wall already has enough colors to me that anything else would make it too busy.

I am not sure if my mini experiment really has any relevance but I thought it would not hurt to write about it.

Also, here is a link to a small part of the documentary "Do you see what I see?"

www.youtube.com...



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 01:15 PM
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*perception and *color!

This question gets asked all the time, not necessarily here but I've heard it a bunch. I think we are all seeing the same colors, unless there is some issue (color blindness etc.). Since color is light reflecting on a certain wavelength and we all have pretty much the same eyes etc.



posted on Nov, 17 2011 @ 03:39 PM
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I'm not sure of the status of confirmation but some humans may be tetrachromats instead of the usual trichromats where they perceive four primary colors instead of the usual three red, green and blue components provided by cone cells in the retina. For those with otherwise normal vision, who knows what is seen in terms of qualia. No way to commicate that information directly to another has been conceived.



posted on Nov, 24 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by luciddream
 


I know this is pretty much a dead thread, but I thought I would offer my 2 cents, as this seemed the most interesting (to me) at a glance of your thread list..

You pointed out that the word "purple" is just a word and not connected with what you see in the purple glove..

Just think of "purpleness" itself as a symbol, when compared to the perception of other people..

With a color-blind person, they simply do not perceive "purple-ness" just in the same way that deaf people do not perceive "sound".. it simply evades them.

now.. I ask you this..

since every "concept" in each person's head is really a summarization of memories related to each "concept", do we see ANYTHING the same, when it is processed in our brain..?
Sure, the tree that I see, IS the tree that you see.. BUT that is not an answer to the original question..

You may see the tree, know its species, know its colour, but without the sight of a tree-climber, you may never notice the separation of the branches, the quality of the bark.. just as the tree-climber probably doesn't have the sight of the corporate business man who sees the tree as revenue or an obstacle, and were we to see through his eyes, we wouldn't see what we recognize as a "tree" at all..

The OP is questioning far more than just color, if you are willing to look..



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 12:21 AM
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Look at the tree through your worldview and see it how you want to see it.

Drop your pre-conceived notions and you see the tree as it is.

A bat "sees" a tree without sight of it.

We can hear the sound of orange in a trumpet and the sound of blue in a clarinet.

But what are we really saying when we claim to hear the sound of orange? We take all things we previously associated with the color orange and synthesize it into a general idea of what orange represents. We then consider how a sound makes us feel and associate it with the general ideas we associate with different colors. Without pre-conceived notions we cannot claim to hear the sound of orange.

Just my current thoughts not sure if this gets us anywhere...



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:00 AM
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reply to post by HyphenSt1
 


OP here, thats really interesting things you brought up, my original OP was intended more than what was said, i think you got what i meant.




posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by luciddream
 


In reading and attending a weekend workshop of Robert Anton Wilson's, one of the main points he wanted to get across is that everyone sees a different room when they walk into it. The size of the room, color of objects, and what we "see" in our brain's creation of that room differs from person to person. I'd assume color would be nearly the same for everyone, but not quite. I often say something is one color, and someone else says it's another.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Yes, It is interesting that we see things slightly different, but when we describe it, does the other person converts description into their own version?

Its really amazing to just wonder, my "current world view" is not the same as yours. You might be seeing something different but when you describe it to me, i just convert them to my perspective.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


wow, I have heard interviews where Robert Anton Wilson talks about those experiments with the crowd but.. yeah. I envy you haha. RAW's writings and thoughts have inspired a lot of what I have written about here on ATS and has really helped guide my research.

One of the most unique and unappreciated writers of the last generation.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by luciddream
 


with each perception seeming to be so individual, it's also interesting to wonder how we manage to communicate anything at all? Language IS indeed just symbol and sound combinations, but somehow those combos DO attach themselves to archetypes and conceptual maps in our heads and we are at least able to communicate a rough semblance of the original thought or idea.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 11:29 AM
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HyphenSt1
reply to post by Aleister
 


wow, I have heard interviews where Robert Anton Wilson talks about those experiments with the crowd but.. yeah. I envy you haha. RAW's writings and thoughts have inspired a lot of what I have written about here on ATS and has really helped guide my research.

One of the most unique and unappreciated writers of the last generation.


What he did was we went into the lobby of the building, then walked through a hall and into the room where RAW was starting his weekend seminar. The first thing he asked us to do was write down what we remembered of the hallway. Of course, as he knew, each person there wrote down something different - each had their own unique hallway memory. Some of the things overlapped, but not many. He went on to do several of these experiments, to show us in real life what he was talking about when discussing individual reality tunnels. At the time of this seminar he had just returned from livng in Ireland, and had many good stories about his times there.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 12:32 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


that's truly awesome. That experiment demonstrates what pages and pages and pages of thread discussion could only *hope* to accomplish haha. Helping people draw their own conclusions and realizations about subjectivity by USING subjectivity is simply brilliant.
Granted, much of his work is based upon that of others (Alfred Korzybski, James Joyce, Aleister Crowley, Timothy Leary etc) I think that between his Non-Fiction and Fiction, he actually demonstrates these people's ideas instead of just discussing them. Without those books, it would have probably taken be decades to draw similarities between Crowley and Leary, and perhaps would have NEVER heard of Korzybski and taken interest in Semantics.
RAW did a lot of the work for us, if people are willing to investigate his stuff.

for fiction: The Masks of the Illuminati or The Illuminatus Chronicles are both masterpieces and good places to start

for non-fiction: the Cosmic Trigger series or Right Where You Are Sitting Now and Coinci-Dance are all mindblowers.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by luciddream
 
I understand that the perception of the colors as shade and intensity can be function accordingly with the state of mind,as a feeling which can generate the mental impression that a color can be more or less intense.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 12:45 PM
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If you imagine that you are a colour - do you think everyone sees the same when they look at you?

Does anyone ever actually look at the scenery?



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by Itisnowagain
 


very profound question put in a very concise way!!

Indeed we are each like a color (or a perhaps more like a chord in music) where our frequencies appear a certain way when juxtaposed to other colors and mixed as when we say "we get close to someone", our colors/chords mix and result in harmonies, dissonances, and overtones that ripple into the realms of color/chords in our peripheral.

and so it is fitting that those who do look at the scenery are called "enlightened" and when put in context, it is impossible to see "enlightenment" as a stagnant "destination" because it is simply the state of seeing what is there rather than what you project onto it (the "ignor-ant" person being equivalent to someone who is color-blind perhaps?)
edit on 25-11-2013 by HyphenSt1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2014 @ 09:57 AM
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S&F OP, very interesting read....

Im color blind!

I learned this years ago during a Pre-employment eye test for the railroad.

Then just yesterday this fact was validated for me while watching an episode of "brain games" with two co-workers.

We were shown three colorful images with numbers hidden inside. They clearly saw the first two and not the third.

While I could not see the first two and clearly saw the third.

Then the show continued on and explained color blindness in some people like myself.

Anyway I thought that was really interesting which is why this morning I entered "color blind" into our ATS search function hoping to find threads just like this one!

And of course ATS has once again provided the info I seek



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by GoShredAK
 


Glad this thread helped you in some way.



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