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Dead Fish from a cloud?

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posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 10:24 PM
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Just saw this story on our local news here in Houston. I am concerned that this might be mis-information or a Media cover-up, but I wanted to get some input from everyone here first.


DICKINSON — Part of Dickinson Bayou was covered with dead fish after a massive kill. The fish are Gulf menhaden, commonly known as shad, and there were tens of thousands floating in the bayou.

That’s not a coincidence, said Winston Denton, a biologist with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

The fish die because of a lack of oxygen. When there is an abundance of algae, as there is now, the plants produce oxygen during sunny periods. When Saturday’s rains and clouds came, the algae shut down and the shad quickly became oxygen-starved.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


What does everyone think about this? I just want to know if there is truth to the story that fish, these "shad" in particular, can become oxygen starved so quickly.

I also notice that in the article they quote Winston Denton “It started (last week), and on Friday, there were millions of dead fish in the water," yet they also quote that "When Saturday’s rains and clouds came, the algae shut down and the shad quickly became oxygen-starved."

Is this mis-information or a Media Cover-Up? Or am I just getting worried for no reason?

Edit: Forgot to add the link to the story. Galveston Daily News
edit on 7/17/2011 by trippvail because: entered link for story



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 10:30 PM
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Have you noticed how we only get a clear sky on clear days until about 3 and then its like a sheet of smog (in your area)? That has been the case here, its very rare for me to see more than 30% bare sky. These may be "manufactured" in my opinion, but since i'm not a meteorologist/nephologists so I must be wrong...

Ut-oh, here come the "chemie" trolls...



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 10:30 PM
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Well, there's probably a lot of truth to it. My understanding is that algae takes over the top of the water. Now, when it's sunny it's no big deal. But when it's dark, they start sucking up the oxygen in the water and blocking more oxygen from getting in from the atmosphere.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 10:36 PM
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Originally posted by EmVeeFF
Have you noticed how we only get a clear sky on clear days until about 3 and then its like a sheet of smog (in your area)? That has been the case here, its very rare for me to see more than 30% bare sky. These may be "manufactured" in my opinion, but since i'm not a meteorologist/nephologists so I must be wrong...

Ut-oh, here come the "chemie" trolls...



No smog really. I understand that most of the afternoon rain around here is bay produced from the heat and evaporated warm water. The smog I see tends to be higher up and I always assumed it was from people burning trash/brushweeds, from the ports and plants around us, or from wildfires.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by trippvail
 


Yeah, it isnt "smog" specifically. Usually I see a bunch of normal clouds surrounded by "dispersed" or "stretched" clouds.



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