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Loss of large predators disrupting multiple plant, animal and human ecosystems

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posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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We are all probably fairly familiar with the "bottom up" theory of ecosystem disruption or extinction. For example, a plant that is the only food of a certain deer is wiped out, the deer is then wiped out, the animals that feed on the deer are wiped out, etc.

Ever think there might be a "top down" version of that?? That is just what scientists are discovering..

Loss of large predators disrupting multiple plant, animal and human ecosystems


The enormous decline of large, apex predators and "consumers" ranging from wolves to lions, sharks and sea otters may represent the most powerful impacts humans have ever had on Earth's ecosystems, a group of 24 researchers concluded today in a new report in the journal Science.


Often large predators are the first to fall to human intervention. Lets face it, sadly many people do not want lions, tigers and bears living next door. Oh my!

But what effect does this have when they are wiped out? It means their prey thrives, often with disastrous results.



Reduction of cougar in Utah led to an eruption of deer, loss of vegetation, altered stream channels, and a decline in biodiversity.

Industrial whaling in the 20th century likely caused a killer whale diet shift and a dramatic decline of sea lions, seals and sea otters.

Decimation of sharks resulted in an outbreak of cow-nosed rays and the collapse of bay scallop fisheries.

Sea otters enhance kelp abundance by limiting herbivorous sea urchins.

The reduction of lions and leopards in Africa led to a population explosion in olive baboons, which bring intestinal parasites to humans who live in close proximity to them.


Many people think the predators kind of "coast along" at the top of the food chain and their removal does nothing to chain underneath. That appears to be incorrect. Scientists are now thinking removal of top predators may be one of the most damaging things man can do to ecosystems.

If you happen to live in an area where wolves still roam and hear a howl in the night - just roll over and go back to sleep. Its when you don't hear the howl that its time to worry.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 05:41 PM
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Recently was in discussions with an emertius professor of an university that I'll keep anonymous. He is a climatologist, and said that we've passed the point of no return. He states this realization came about late 2006, and at our current rate, we're wiping out 200-300 species per DAY



So yeah, get drunk, and score some brownie points with the ladies



It's not too much longer after the collapse of the global financial systems that global ecosystem collapses become a reality.

Enjoy!



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 05:52 PM
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There's an easy solution to this that humanity has been working on for awhile actually: Just kill everything.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 06:18 PM
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Makes sense.

Whether bottom-up, or top-down, we are talking about the balance of nature getting out of whack.

That's simply messed up. Repercussions will be inevitable.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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willl facebook still work
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posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 07:22 PM
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Yeah, the answer seems simple. Eat more venison. Commercialized deer roundups and processing. I'd like two McBambis, large fries and a large coke.



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 01:13 AM
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reply to post by Frogs
 


But they look so impressive with their heads hanging on a wall in the den and their skins decorating the floor.
It is a real shame we have no way other than our own poorly adapted brains to see the effects of what we do, before we do it.



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 01:15 AM
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Originally posted by Bramble Iceshimmer
Yeah, the answer seems simple. Eat more venison. Commercialized deer roundups and processing. I'd like two McBambis, large fries and a large coke.



Wow that WAS simple. We really must be the stupidest creature on the planet.
Surprised we are in such a state with all these easy answers abounding left and right.



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 01:19 AM
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Originally posted by unityemissions
Recently was in discussions with an emertius professor of an university that I'll keep anonymous. He is a climatologist, and said that we've passed the point of no return. He states this realization came about late 2006, and at our current rate, we're wiping out 200-300 species per DAY



So yeah, get drunk, and score some brownie points with the ladies



It's not too much longer after the collapse of the global financial systems that global ecosystem collapses become a reality.

Enjoy!


I am hoping to be reincarnated and I am requesting a transfer to a planet where the people are a little smarter. That's my big plan. Death.
It is too late for human intervention to save this pretty little blue-green marble.




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