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Police look for link between C4 explosives in Manhattan cemetery and bizarre note found nearby

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posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 07:51 PM
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Police look for link between C4 explosives in Manhattan cemetery and bizarre note found nearby


www.nydailynews.com

A cemetery caretaker found several pounds of military-grade plastic explosives buried in a historic East Village boneyard, cops announced Monday.

They were looking into a possible connection to a bizarre note left with cops that was signed "Jesus," and a chalked note on the sidewalk in front of the cemetery.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.hometownannapolis.com
www.nationalterroralert.com< br /> www.nytimes.com
en.wikipedia.org
edit on 12-10-2010 by Jakes51 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 07:51 PM
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Interesting that police have found quite a significant cache of explosive materials. It is military grade C-4. The article mentioned that one stick is an equivalent to a detonation of 8 grenades.

The material sat near a tree for over year after being placed there by a caretaker until it was found by a person on Sunday. According to the article, investigators believe the materials may have been there for some time before the caretaker found it. Another interesting aspect to the story is a message being found at two locations, one being left on a police cruiser and another in front of the cemetery.

In the world of terrorist threats and other social misfortunes to befall us, who left this stuff there and how was it acquired? If it is military grade explosives, it is not something easily acquired, and if it was purchased legitimately; I would reckon there is some kind of registry of the people purchasing it for civilian purposes? Furthermore, the article mentions an organized crime side to the material. Then we can't rule out a terrorist cell leaving the stuff behind for later use as well. The article says the material was used in the 2005 London Bombings. So, lets put our tin-foil hats on and just speculate as to who may have left this behind and why?

www.nydailynews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 12-10-2010 by Jakes51 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by Jakes51
 


I am guessing it will turn out like another Joseph Stack, except with an internet twinge, maybe some 4chan kids or that laughing man character. Whether they are actually involved or not does not matter, just like the motives or reality behind Joseph Stack does not matter. No one questions the media on the media's terms, so the official story will be the official story no matter how many people disagree.

Why do I say it will eventually end up demonizing the internet? Because they cant control it as well as everything else, and they need to shut down the fringe. Plus if your looking for anything of that magnitude these days its very easy to acquire over the internet, just got to meet the right people on the right forums I am sure.
edit on 12-10-2010 by Aziroth because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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Has the full text of the note been revealed?



posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by Aziroth
 


Oh yes, Joseph Stack, the disgruntled software engineer who flew his airplane into the IRS Building in Austin about a tax matter. That story is so full of holes you could put it on a ham sandwich and call it Swiss cheese. There is more to that than meets the eye. However, that is for another time, but I see your point of how the TPTB can use this story as it stands now to say whatever they want. They could allege it was some militia group who left it behind, some Tea Party people, an unknown terror cell, and other politically advantageous scenarios.

There is a midterm election coming up very shortly. Politicians often use things like this to boost their stock in an election, and this story could very well do that. Moreover, you mentioned the power of the internet. It is a very powerful instrument, and the government has been toying around with getting their hands on that as well. We shall see where this goes, and it can go in many directions.



posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 08:46 PM
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Originally posted by ghostsoldier
Has the full text of the note been revealed?


I am not sure? Let me look into it a little further, because the article only alluded to some of it. As it stands, Police Commission, Raymond Kelly, mentioned they are not seeing any link between the explosives and the notes. It is odd that these notes started showing up at around the same time the explosive materials were found? Let me see if I can find it.



posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 08:55 PM
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I do not buy a "terrorist" explanation. A terrorist act would not have resulted in unused ordinance being found in a cemetery.



posted on Oct, 12 2010 @ 09:16 PM
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Here is what appears to be the contents of the two notes. One written in chalk at the entrance of the cemetery and another left on a police vehicle.



. . . investigators found a message written in what appeared to be chalk on the sidewalk in front of the cemetery that said, “I really hope one of you find this.”

. . . Another note was found on a police cruiser at the Ninth Precinct station house yesterday, saying, “Stop putting Christ on Second Street." It was signed by Jesus Christ . . .

gothamist.com...

That appears to be the contents of the notes. Perhaps, it some crazed atheist or secular group leaving the messages? Are the notes linked to the explosives? That is still up in the air, because it appears the explosives have aged quite a bit.



The military-grade explosives found at a historic New York City cemetery are more than 13 years old, police said Tuesday.

. . . NYPD spokesman Paul Browne said Tuesday that the eight M-112 sticks were tested and did not have an identifying piece that all military C-4 were required to have after 1997. The identifier is used so military members can figure out where it has exploded, if necessary . . .

www.google.com...

The police are going to have their worked cut out for them in trying to solve this one. They have been in that cemetery for over a decade, and have no identifying features to trace their origins. Moreover, then there are the mysterious notes found at the same time. Another thing to keep in mind, the explosive were missing detonators and blast caps. Who knows where they are? There was no immediate threat of explosion.
edit on 12-10-2010 by Jakes51 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2010 @ 10:17 AM
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The fact that no detonators were found means nothing. They are typically sold separately and are never stored together lest static electricity sets off the little devils and make the C-4 go boom.

Having them together would be bad... If I were the police, I would however look through the rest of the graveyard in case they are buried nearby.



posted on Oct, 18 2010 @ 04:33 AM
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Here is a little more about the mysterious ordinance found in the East Village at that old cemetery. Now bare with me here, because it is only one man's speculation on the origins of this material. The Villager caught up with a guy named Dana Beal, who is a long time resident of the East Village and knowledgeable about the area where the explosives were found. He has connected dots linking a Neo-Nazi arms dealer, cop killer, and drug dealer as to how that mysterious bag of ordinance ended up in that historic cemetery years ago.

Yippie thinks he’s solved case of mysterious explosives cache


Beal said his hunch is basically that the C-4 explosives could be connected to David Degondea, who is currently in prison Upstate for killing a New York City police officer. Degondea, according to Beal, was a young “weapons dealer” who was dating Linda Twig, who lived in an E. Second St. tenement building whose rear wall happens to abut the Marble Cemetery.

Degondea, Beal said, was “a dangerous, violent young man.”


Now, perhaps, this guy is concocting an interesting ruse for some attention by the media? He looks like Mark Twain and calls himself a "Yippie," which according to The Villager, is a throwback to the counter culture movement from the sixties.





is a leading Yippie, or member of the Youth International Party, the countercultural group formed in the 1960’s, known for its prankster activism. He’s also the organizer of the annual Global Marijuana March, as well as an advocate for ibogaine, a purported cure for heroin addiction.

www.thevillager.com...

More about Beal's alleged suspect David Degandea. He was a one time resident of the area, and is serving time upstate for killing an NYPD Narcotics Officer in 1993. Apparently, the incident was a police led drug buy that went horribly wrong.

Detective Dies In Shooting In Drug Case


An undercover narcotics detective who had just returned with backup officers to complete a "buy and bust" marijuana deal was slain yesterday afternoon when one suspect opened fire at a silk-screening store in the East Village, the police said.

He was the first officer killed in the line of duty this year.

The detective, Luis Lopez, a 35-year-old father of two from Staten Island, died on an operating table at Bellevue Hospital Center at 5 P.M., an hour after he was shot in the chest.


Degondea is quite the character himself, and has even went so far as to sue the NYPD for loss of income and damages resulting from his 1993 arrest. The law suit was reported in 1995 Chicago Reader article in its News of the Weird section.



In January David Degondea, convicted of killing a police officer, filed a $3 million lawsuit against the New York City Police Department. He claims he's entitled to the money because officers injured him during the arrest and because the arrest resulted in a loss of earnings. Police evidence shows that Degondea's only occupation was dealing drugs.

www.chicagoreader.com...

Clearly, this guy a few cans short of a six pack. Moreover, it seems he had an association with a Neo-Nazi arms dealer, and who was an acquaintance of Degondea's girlfriend, Linda Twig. The alleged Neo-Nazi in question is known as Henry Nuesslein, and was arrested and convicted in the mid nineties for having a cache of weapons, ordinance, and bomb making materials.

GRENADES, GUNS TOP MAN'S TRIAL


Nuesslein was arrested in March 1995 after police found in his filthy Borough Park apartment nine hand grenades, nearly a dozen rifles, 17 boxes of ammunition, several explosive devices, switchblades, cane swords, firecrackers and other guns.

Police, who had responded to a landlord's complaint about a water leak from Nuesslein's apartment, also seized neo-Nazi literature from the debris-filled apartment. A judge, however, ruled that the material was inadmissible at trial.


Nuesslein was a friend of Degondea's girlfriend at the time, and apparently through some cross-referencing, Beal was able to link the explosives found in the cemetery to Nusslein and Degondea. His theory goes further regarding the girlfriend and her role in all this after the 1993 arrest.



To make a long story short, Beal’s theory is that after Degondea was arrested, Degondea had to stash his weapons cache somewhere. Nuesslein might have been given some of Degondea’s “arsenal,” but probably declined on the C-4, feeling it was too dangerous, Beal surmised; as a result, Twig likely used a ladder to get down into the locked cemetery, where she buried the C-4.

. . . Interestingly, Beal noted, the detectives were focusing on the eastern end of the graveyard, near where Twig had lived. A detective entering the cemetery, when asked exactly where inside the burial ground the C-4 was found, just shook his head and declined to answer . . .

www.thevillager.com...

Who really knows how the explosives got into that cemetery, and although Beal seems to be a deep-fried leftover from the counterculture era of sixties; his story is interesting to say the least. Now we have some names to go along with the official story, and a wild theory to kick around in our heads for awhile. Personally, I think the guy is seeking attention, but that is just me. Two who are allegedly responsible for the ordinance according to Beal are now deceased, Henry Nuesslein and Linda Twig. David Degondea remains upstate serving out his sentence from the cop killing incident from 1993. We shall see if this Yippie's story pans out, and if the origins of the explosives are indeed linked to Degondea and Nuesslein?

edit on 18-10-2010 by Jakes51 because: (no reason given)



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