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Vyamanika Shastra: A discussion

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posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by endless_observer
 


Howdy EO

I have to say that is one wild claim, LOL

Sorry as the astute coredrill notes, the implausibility of your statements are immense and the evidence against you so formidable we'll need a heavy duty apomecometer to measure the distance from reality on that one.


Thank you for at least being polite in your reply, even if you are trying to make a joke of my post.

The fact is, regardless of what "experts" have to say on the matter, I can only relay the information that I read when I had the copy of the earliest (english) publication in my hands. I cannot quote a website to back up my claims. The best I can do is try to relocate the book and scan the pages with the history of the manuscript, though I don't know if I can post that here as it may be a violation of someone's copyright. (I understand that there's been talk of it being an orphaned copyright, but I don't know if ATS will allow it.) Nevertheless, I will at least try to get my hands back on that copy and quote what it says word for word.



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by endless_observer
 


Howdy EO

I believe you may have been deceived by one or more fringe writers or sites. I haven't seen that particular claim before-but it does make sense that this document would be important to try and post date. At present as a 'channeled' document from the early 20th century it has little value. If its date could be pushed back it would gain the "golden age" patina that old documents get.

I'll just repost the main point from the Wiki document on it


Subbaraya Shastry was a mystic from Anekal, who was reputed to speak out verses (slokas) whenever he got inspiration, described by Josyer as "a walking lexicon gifted with occult perception". According to Josyer, he dictated the text to G. Venkatachala Sharma in the early 1900s (completing it in 1923).

Subbaraya Shastry died in 1941, and Venkatachala took his manuscripts into keeping. The Vaimanika Shastra manuscript appeared at Rajakiya Sanskrit Library, Baroda by 1944 The text was published in Hindi in 1959 and later in English by G.R. Josyer, titled Vymanika Shastra. Josyer's edition, also added illustrations drawn by T. K. Ellappa, a draughtsman at a local engineering college in Bangalore, under the direction of Shastry, which had been missed in the 1959 edition.

Its existence was first announced publicly in a 1952 press release by G.R. Josyer, who had founded his "International Academy of Sanskrit Research" in Mysore the year before. In the foreword to the 1973 publication that contained the full Sanskrit text with English translation, Josyer quotes a 1952 press release of his which was "published in all the leading dailies of India, and was taken up by Reuter and other World Press News Services":

Mr. G. R. Josyer, Director of the International Academy of Sanskrit Research in Mysore, in the course of an interview recently, showed some very ancient manuscripts which the Academy had collected. He claimed that the manuscripts were several thousands of years old, compiled by ancient rishis, Bharadwaja, Narada and others, dealing, not with the mysticism of ancient Hindu philosophy of Atman or Brahman, but with more mundane things vital for the existence of man and progress of nations both in times of peace and war. [...] One manuscript dealt with Aeronautics, construction of various types of aircraft for civil aviation and for warfare. [...] Mr. Josyer showed some types of designs and drawing of a helicopter-type cargo-loading plane, specially meant for carrying combustibles and ammunition, passenger aircraft carrying 400 to 500 persons, double and treble-decked aircraft. Each of these types had been fully described.

Josyer then tells how he was visited by "Miss Jean Lyon, journalist of Toronto and New York" for an interview, and how Lyon in her Just Half a World Away (1954) concluded that he was "guilty of a rabid nationalism, seeking to wipe out everything since the Vedas".

A critical review pronounced Josyer's introduction to be "least scholarly by any standards." and said that "the people connected with publication – directly or indirectly – are solely to blame either for distorting or hiding the history of the manuscripts." perhaps in an attempt to "eulogise and glorify whatever they can find about our past, even without valid evidence." By tracing the provenance of the manuscript, interviewing associates of S. Shastry (including G. V. Sharma to whom the text was originally dictated), and based on the linguistic analysis of the text, the review concluded that it came into existence sometime between 1900 and 1922.



Good luck in your search

[edit on 25/1/09 by Hanslune]



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 12:07 AM
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reply to post by endless_observer
 


Sorry, I am person who calls a spade ..a spade.
If that amounts to Jerk-iness, sorry, i am quite happy to live with that.

If it has offended you, i am sorry.

Coming to the point,
Cross verify your sources before coming to a conclusion.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 12:15 PM
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Originally posted by endless_observer
1. I never stated that I had read the original manuscript. I stated that I had read a copy of the original publication, and that publication stated that the original manuscript had been found in the area of mohenjo-dara.

No, but you did make the claim that statements made by the only publisher of record for the V.S. were "flatly false."
You should pardon others who have read these claims. They likely have not laid eyes on the manuscript you claim to have seen.

Given the fact that even the "true believers" acknowledge the V.S. as a channelled work, you should also pardon others for deciding to evaluate your claim as other than trustworthy.

You have now (somewhat) backed down from your previous brash statement. You should understand that your claim now consists of "I read somewhere that..."
For example:

Originally posted by endless_observer3. I'm only relaying the information that I did, in fact, read. You needn't be such an absolute jerk when replying to a post on a web forum.

And you have chosen to let your posts degenerate into name calling.

Not exactly convincing, right?

Harte



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 01:01 PM
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Once i was discussing V.S in another forum, being of the belief that it was indeed an ancient manuscript. I had a argument with Harte (he is also there) and that made me look up V.S in detail and found that it was a channelized "Masterpiece" and i read the study of the book by scientists at Indian Institute of Science and ..yes..i had to go back on what i was arguing.

That was a turning point in my belief system -

Now i dont accept anything without evidence/proof and understand wholly that you cant prove a negative and that Occam's Razor is a wonderful tool.

[edit on 27/1/09 by coredrill]



posted on Oct, 25 2010 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by Harte
Not that I dispute them, necessarily. But I myself wouldn't rely on a proven liar such as Billy Meier or his sidekicks to provide my evidence for me.



Originally posted by Harte
The dang Mahabharata is, what, over a thousand pages, and very difficult to wade through because of the sentence structure in the translation.

Given that we agree that these phrases (or similar ones) can be found there, IMO there's no need to check this.

However, my point was that Spacevisitor didn't check them either, but he did make the claim.


PRICELESS absolutely PRICELESS

The passages are , as you admit, real, yet you try to argue against them using the credibility of the person merely quoting them



THIS one I frame




posted on Oct, 25 2010 @ 07:46 AM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by Harte
Not that I dispute them, necessarily. But I myself wouldn't rely on a proven liar such as Billy Meier or his sidekicks to provide my evidence for me.



Originally posted by Harte
The dang Mahabharata is, what, over a thousand pages, and very difficult to wade through because of the sentence structure in the translation.

Given that we agree that these phrases (or similar ones) can be found there, IMO there's no need to check this.

However, my point was that Spacevisitor didn't check them either, but he did make the claim.


PRICELESS absolutely PRICELESS

The passages are , as you admit, real, yet you try to argue against them using the credibility of the person merely quoting them



THIS one I frame



Frame away.

Perhaps you should re-read.

I never argued that the passages in question weren't in the Vedic texts. Please note, the quote from me you provided involved a post in a different thread.

Have you read what was claimed there?

Harte



posted on Oct, 10 2011 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


if you ever read the mahabarhata or the ramayana you would realize that Viamankia Shastra is the original of the english translation Vymanik Shastra done by G.R. Josyer. the original Viamankia Shastra was originally wrote by Maharshi Bharadwaaja in sanskrit



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 01:01 AM
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Originally posted by zenthrose
reply to post by Hanslune
 


if you ever read the mahabarhata or the ramayana you would realize that Viamankia Shastra is the original of the english translation Vymanik Shastra done by G.R. Josyer. the original Viamankia Shastra was originally wrote by Maharshi Bharadwaaja in sanskrit


Howdy

Unfortunately that is not true - it is a modern creation with a poorly constructed back story. It is widely believed by UFO'ers to be real real but there is zero evidence to support this contention.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


have you ever read the mahabharata or the ramayana? i have both of them in the original sanskrit as well as the english translations of them. and the way that it reads is from much earlier than what most ppl would understand, but if you go to a site that will let you translate from sanskrit to english, then you get something similar to the 1864 english translation of both of the mahabharata and the ramayana.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by zenthrose
 


What if anything do those works have to do with the Vimanika Shastra?

Aside from the fact that vimanas are referenced in them?

The Mahabharata and the Ramayana are ancient works, the Vimanika Shastra is 20th century "channeling".
edit on 10/11/2011 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


the vaimanika shastra was wrote in the mid 4th century BCE by channeling, the vymanika shastra is the english translation of the work.

the reason i mention both mahabharata and the ramayana is because they both mention the work of the vaimanika shastra. i will post the exact phrase in both the english and the sanskrit text of both mahabarata and the ramayana



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 08:26 PM
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Originally posted by zenthrose
reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


the vaimanika shastra was wrote in the mid 4th century BCE by channeling, the vymanika shastra is the english translation of the work.

the reason i mention both mahabharata and the ramayana is because they both mention the work of the vaimanika shastra. i will post the exact phrase in both the english and the sanskrit text of both mahabarata and the ramayana


We look forward to you doing so!



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by zenthrose
 





the reason i mention both mahabharata and the ramayana is because they both mention the work of the vaimanika shastra. i will post the exact phrase in both the english and the sanskrit text of both mahabarata and the ramayana


Just wondering if you found those passages yet. I would like to see them.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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The Indian epic Ramayana describes Rama as one of the emissaries of such
Agharta, air from a vehicle that was probably a flying saucer.
A Chinese tradition speaks of divine teachers coming in vehicles
air. In the same way he came Manco Copac, the founder of the Inca dynasty.
One of the greatest teachers of Agharta in America was Quetzalcoatl, the
great prophet of the Mayans and Aztecs and Indians of both Americas, North and
the south. It was indicated that he was a stranger among the Indians, being of a race
different (Atlantean) for being blonde, while they were dark, deep, when the Indians
low, bearded, unlike the Indians deprived of beards. He was revered
as the savior of the Indians of Mexico, Yucatan and Guatemala long before the
arrival of white men. The Aztecs called it "God's Abundance" and
"Morning Star". His name Quetzalcoatl means "Feathered Serpent"
meaning the teacher of wisdom (symbolized by the serpent) who flies. He was
given this name by a vehicle that came by air, which seems to have been a hard
flyer. Probably came from the underworld why, after spending 204
time with the Indians, disappeared mysteriously in the same way
had come; believed to have returned to the Underworld where he came from.
Quetzalcoatl is described as being "a man of good appearance and
face severe skin and white beard, dressed in a white dress, long and
floating ". Huemac He was also called because of his great kindness and
continence. Indians taught the path of virtue and tried to save them from addiction,
giving them laws and counsel to restrain them from lust and cause them to be chaste.
He taught pacifism and condemned violence in all its forms. Instituted a
vegetarian diet, with corn as staple food, and taught fasting and
personal hygiene. According to the South American archeologist, Harold Wilkins,
Quetzalcoatl was also the spiritual teacher of the ancient inhabitants of Brazil.
After spending some time with the Indians and seeing how little
linked to his teachings, with the exception of its recommendation for
sow and eat corn, Quetzalcoatl departed, telling them he would return one day. That
this "visitor from Heaven" went the same way it came - a flying saucer -
is indicated by the following facts. When Cortez invaded Mexico, the emperor
Montezuma believed that there had been expected "return of Quetzalcoatl," by
that then a fireball turned on to Mexico City, making the people groan
and scream, and put fire in the temple of the god of war. They believed that ball
Fire was the flying saucer on which Quetzalcoatl traveled There is something to do with nibiru



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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reply to post by dogtalesfrom2011
 


You didn't even mention the topic:

the Vimanika Shastra...



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by dogtalesfrom2011
 


You might want to check which 'level' you are getting your info from

1. Pre-contact info on Quezla - and the various groups looked at him differently and his attributes changed over time - ie he evolved

2. Post conquest info on Quezla

3. New age stuff on Quezla

Most of yours seems to be new age and post conquest. I would suggest you look at what the mesoamericans had to say about their religious beliefs and not outsiders.



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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The Indian Emperor Ashoka started a "Secret Society of the Nine Unknown
Men": great Indian scientists who were supposed to catalogue the many
sciences. Ashoka kept their work secret because he was afraid that the
advanced science catalogued by these men, culled from ancient Indian
sources, would be used for the evil purpose of war, which Ashoka was
strongly against, having been converted to Buddhism after defeating a rival
army in a bloody battle. The "Nine Unknown Men" wrote a total of nine
books, presumably one each.

Book number was "The Secrets of Gravitation!" This book, known to
historians, but not actually seen by them dealt chiefly with "gravity control."
It is presumably still around somewhere, kept in a secret library in India,
Tibet or elsewhere (perhaps even in North America somewhere). One can
certainly undertand Ashoka's reasoning for wanting to keep such
knowledge a secret, assuming it exists. if the Nazis had such weapons at
their disposal during World War II. Ashoka was also aware devastating
wars using such advanced vehicles and other "futuristic weapons" that had
destoryed the ancient Indian "Rama Empire" several thousand years
before..

According to ancient Indian texts, the people had flying machines which
were called "Vimanas." The ancient Indian epic describes a Vimana as a
double-deck, circular aircraft with portholes and a dome, much as we would
imagine a flying saucer. It flew with the "speed of the wind" and gave forth a
"melodious sound." There were at least four different types of Vimanas;
some saucer shaped, others like long cylinders ("cigar shaped airships").

In 1875, the Vaimanika Sastra, a fourth century B.C. text written by
Bharadvajy the Wise, using even older texts as his source, was
rediscovered in a temple in India. It dealt with the operation of Vimanas and
included information on the steering, precautions for long flights, protection
of the airships from storms and lightening and how to switch the drive to
"solar energy" from a free energy source which sounds like "anti-gravity."
The Vaimanika Sastra (or Vymaanika-Shaastra) has eight chapters with
diagrams, describing three types of aircraft, including apparatuses that
could neither catch on fire nor break. It also mentions 31 essential parts of
these vehicles and 16 materials from which they are constructed, which
absorb light and heat; for which reason they were considered suitable for
the construction of Vimanas.
This document has been translated into English and is available by writing
the publisher: VYMAANIDASHAASTRA AERONAUTICS by Maharishi
Bharadwaaja, translated into English and edited, printed and published by
Mr. G. R. Josyer, Mysore, India, 1979. Mr. Josyer is the director of the
International Academy of Sanskrit Investigation located in Mysore. There
seems to be no doubt that Vimanas were powered by some sort of "antigravity." Vimanas took off vertically, and were .

Vimanas were kept in a Vimana Griha, a kind of hanger, and were
sometimes said to be propelled by a yellowish-white liquid, and sometimes
by some sort of mercury compound, though writers seem confused in this
matter. It is most likely that the later writers on Vimanas, wrote as observers
and from earlier texts, and were understandably confused on the principle
of their propulsion. The "yellowishwhite liquid" sounds suspiciously like
gasoline, and perhaps Vimanas had a number of different propulsion
sources, including combustion engines and even "pulse-jet" engines.

It is interesting to note that when Alexander the Great invaded India more
than two thousand years ago, his historians chronicled that at one point
they were attacked by "flying, fiery shields" that dove at his army and
frightened the cavalry. These "flying saucers" did not use any atomic bombs
or beam weapons on Alexander's army however, perhaps out of
benevolence, and Alexander went on to conquer India.
It is interesting to note, that the Nazis developed the first practical pulse-jet
engines for their V-8 rocket "buzz bombs." Hitler and the Nazi staff were exceptionally interested in ancient India and Tibet and sent expeditions to
both these places yearly, starting in the 30's, in order to gather esoteric
evidence that they did so, and perhaps it was from these people that the
Nazis gained some of their scientific information! According to the
Dronaparva, part of the Mahabarata, and the Ramayana, one Vimana
described was shaped like a sphere and born along at great speed on a
mighty wind generated by mercury.
It moved like a UFO, going up, down, backwards and forwards as the pilot
desired. In another Indian source, the Samar, Vimanas were "iron
machines, well-knit and smooth, with a charge of mercury that shot out of
the back in the form of a roaring flame." Another work called the
Samaranganasutradhara describes how the vehicles were constructed. It is
possible that mercury did have something to



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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I think that when you copy whole sections, you need to give a SOURCE. The V. S. existence is not being debated here. It is its credibility. A "channeled" book doesn't lend itself to much believability.




The Vymanika Shastra was first committed to writing between 1918 and 1923, and nobody is claiming that it came from some mysterious antique manuscript. The fact is, there are no manuscripts of this text prior to 1918, and nobody is claiming that there are. So on one level, this is not a hoax. You just have to buy into the assumption that 'channeling' works

--from the OP. His source: www.bibliotecapleyades.net...
edit on 10/15/2011 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2011 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by dogtalesfrom2011
 


You are posting materials directly from The Anti-Gravity Handbook By David Hatcher Childress. I suggest you stop that and read the ATS membership rules and learn how to make a link, use ex-text and quote........



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