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Top 5 reasons why people convert to a faith.

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posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:05 PM
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In the teen years:

In my teens I was searching for religion.

My daughter at age 13 began her search and started following Buddhism devoutly. For the next five years we were vegetarian LOL. I encouraged her and supported her religious choice and saw it as very positive for her. She grew immensely as a person during that time. Sadly she lost faith and is floundering at 20 years of age now.

My boyfriends daughters were raised christian and go to church regularly and attend functions and youth group. Very positive for them as well.

I think many teens CAN benefit from organized religions (as much as I steer away from there personally). It lends a belonging to their experience and gives them some grounding and community. Many teens NEED that stability.

Of course it depends on the personality of the youth as well as to what and how they get they what they need from their chosen faith.

Ultimately I think ALL children NEED a stabilizing force in their lives in these days, and better it come from a "positive" source than from the streets in form of gangs and thuggish cliques.

Not that religious involvement is the only stability going: there are youth groups with no religious affiliation, cheer leading, youth sports, Girl Guides, Boy Scouts, even political groups for budding pundits and politicians.

Over all I think it's human kinds search for belonging that leads to religious followings of various faiths or mind sets. Not a bad thing over all.

I wish my daughter had kept up with her Buddhist studies. Her current path of interest is in "alternative" religions that offer some kind of "power" to be achieved. Wicca and the like... her personal search clearly stems from her lack of personal power and search for control.

This is where I see religions being detrimental to some in this state. This is where the (insert ANY religion here) faith can become cultist and dangerous. The human search for power and control get's confused with religion(s) and takes on a whole new form. The fear factor becomes the method to corrupt and control those who follow and the religion suffers (as well do the followers).



[edit on 12/7/2008 by justgeneric]



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 




1. The individual was raised to follow a certain religion by his parents. He may follow this well into adulthood even if he questions the tenants, because it is like a security blanket and he may be afraid of dissappointing his parents.

This is the most common reason in my opinion. I was raised in a strict baptist home. I have been a Christian for many years. Leaving Christianity was a long and painful process for me.

Even now I still am afraid of disappointing my family. So most of the time I hide my unbelief in Christianity from them. Every time my mom tells me that gay marriage is very wrong, all I could do is just nod and pretend to agree. I would bow my head in prayer with her during meal times. It's difficult.

I know of some people who go to church to pay lip service just to satisfy their families

Good thread



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by justgeneric
 


There are so many good points here I just don't know where to begin


Most important is you bring up that children do look into faith in their teenage years, and I do not beleive that the parents should try to hinder that, unless there is some actual behavioral concern there.

And yes, youth groups can provide stability,but I remember goign and most of thekids attended just because it was another chance to socialize.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:23 PM
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Originally posted by Deaf Alien
reply to post by asmeone2
 




1. The individual was raised to follow a certain religion by his parents. He may follow this well into adulthood even if he questions the tenants, because it is like a security blanket and he may be afraid of dissappointing his parents.

This is the most common reason in my opinion. I was raised in a strict baptist home. I have been a Christian for many years. Leaving Christianity was a long and painful process for me.

Even now I still am afraid of disappointing my family. So most of the time I hide my unbelief in Christianity from them. Every time my mom tells me that gay marriage is very wrong, all I could do is just nod and pretend to agree. I would bow my head in prayer with her during meal times. It's difficult.


I know exactly how you feel.




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