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Power Doesn't Corrupt, Study Suggests

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posted on Dec, 6 2008 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by DarrylGalasso
 





Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely

I believe that it was Lord Acton.



posted on Dec, 6 2008 @ 11:29 PM
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Corruption is power, power does not corrupt.
We allow power to corrupt in beleiving that power corrupts in making it acceptable by others and we should not!

Serving the greator good in power is a choice people make, or is it?

Power corrupts our government and corruption is strew throughout society, what power is causing this curruption? This corruption stems from within the government and other aspects of society it should be considered as faulty not us, we give power to corruption when we allow ourselfs to become corruptable and those type of weak person's should never be elected into office or congress or any position of power for that matter.

What we have here is the total opposite, that points the finger to one source, and its the same source of people who are pointing the blame on the general populace. We need to turn around and look at them and quite holding a blind eye instead of trying to intregrate into a system based on lies. How badly do people care about their own country? Will the true patriots please stand up!



posted on Dec, 6 2008 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


this is a joke right?



posted on Dec, 6 2008 @ 11:37 PM
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Originally posted by masonwatcher
Oh power does corrupt and I know this from experience. Last time I had total power over others, I developed a 'mwahahaha' laugh and had a habit of dry wiping my hand together when scheming.


And this is exactly why people should be screened and monitered heavily before being given a position of power over others, which would require a re-design of society or a country based on the benifit of others, no less.



posted on Dec, 6 2008 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by AceWombat04
I agree with others that while not everyone may be corrupted by power, everyone is certainly corruptable, and that becomming corrupt as a result of power has less to do with not being influenced by others than it does with being influenced by power itself. With power not only comes responsibility, but, well... power. You are enabled and empowered to do things you couldn't before. This creates the potential for enormous temptation, and in the event that the temptation is satisfied, abuse. Being shielded from outside influences does not equate to not being corrupted by power, simply because 1) no one is ever truly isolated and can thus still be manipulated by outside forces, and 2) being unable to hear dissenting voices enables one to be totally without accountability while in a position of enormous power and influence.


I see your points and they are totally valid. I think it would take a very strong individual to not allow corruption, plus I do see a trend in the corruption of people that suggest to me that there is a very corrupt power above this whole scheme, who opperate and maintains this power. If I only knew one thing it would be that this power does not have our, the people's, best interest at heart. We the people, and our system and country are not truly living a democracy or as free as we like to think.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:13 AM
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Originally posted by DimensionalDetective

college students who were primed to feel powerful suggests that, at least in some cases, power tends to shield people from outside opinions, leaving them to rely more on their own insights.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Oh, so power does not corrupt, it just makes you care only about yourself and not others. Of course.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:20 AM
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Well, I've always seen it this way...

Power doesn't corrupt a person... the corrupt seek power.



Take from it what you will. I've been in many commanding roles, but never sought to have them... I always just wound up in those roles because no-one else was taking the lead.


Those who I have seen desiring to be in a commanding role, and pushing to get it, are usually the ones who wind up being selfish, arrogant, and wholly incapable of making a team work effectively.

Those who are thrown into a commanding role usually put the team first, because they never intended to have been above the team in the first place.

(Replace team with nation, region, or organization if you like. It's all the same really, just with varying numbers to work with.)

[edit on 7-12-2008 by johnsky]



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 
Tgis reminds me of an old story about the farmer who was awakened one night by the noise coming from his chickenhouse.He had recently suspected an old drunken neighbor of stealing his chickens.Out the door he went only to see this neighbor duck into the chickenhouse to hide.The farmer cocked the hammer on his shotgun and yelled out"All right whoever you are come out with your hands up!"Only to hear a course reply of"theres nobody in here but us chickens!".....I wonder if the farmer believed that one too?



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:23 AM
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So power doesn't corrupt huh?

Whoever did this research must have never heard of Hitler.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:25 AM
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Originally posted by truthquest

Originally posted by DimensionalDetective

college students who were primed to feel powerful suggests that, at least in some cases, power tends to shield people from outside opinions, leaving them to rely more on their own insights.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Oh, so power does not corrupt, it just makes you care only about yourself and not others. Of course.


Your twisting the words. They mean that people are generally less inclined to take a bribe in a position of power unless they lack personal commitment, among other things.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 12:41 AM
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powerful people, such as CEOs and other higher-ups, including Obama, might be protected from corruption, especially if it goes against their personal values.


What is their definition of corruption? That's kind of why it is corruption...because normally these powerful people are being shaped by even more powerful people, people that don't get asked questions. people that give answers. people that know exactly how to get away with a crime and have everyone ignorantly cheering for them in the process.

Just wow... the statement itself - might be protected from corruption



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


Nice post, but a bunch of Media sponsered Bullsh^t man.

Tyrany has made all men weak and corrupt.
Freedom is the answer, can we stop the NWO?

WE WILL STOP THE NWO



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by johnsky
 


I think this is a very good point. Perhaps it is not the power that is corrupt and as you stated the corrupt seek out power. If one holds Christian beliefs, certainly it would appear that God is not corrupt and he theoretically holds the ultimate power. Your point has provoked some thought which is never a bad thing. Nice post!

I would also like to add this, (and this is the reason for the edit), I also have been in positions of authority and am currently in one and most likely will be the rest of my working career; however, I do not feel powerful and view myself exactly as you said a leader. I do not want the power, and it certainly gives me no pleasure to have it. On the very rare occasion I have to terminate someone, I usually feel as though I have failed them in some way, unless it is due to theft, in which case I see it as them firing themselves. I have found that the most difficult thing to do in this position is in fact to have to let someone go, I always think about the effect that it will have on their family and others around them, and it makes me feel really miserable, sometimes to the point I wish I had never went to college and just worked in a factory somewhere. I have been told by people that I am too soft, I am weak, I care too much about people (imagine that a psychologist that cares about people?), and that people will take advantage of me because I care (this has actually happened a few times, but what do you do, throw away your morality because of a few ungrateful people, I think not). I see myself as a cog in a machine, although I am a necessary component of the machine, I am still but one piece of it, having no more importance than that of any other piece.

What bothers me is when I hear some of the other department heads gloating over firing someone or making them do nasty jobs. I do not understand how you could take pleasure in another person's suffering. To me that is sick and they probably need professional help more so than many of the people that I try to provide help to.

[edit on 12/7/2008 by DarrylGalasso]



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 01:42 AM
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reply to post by ProfEmeritus
 


Thank you, I could not remember who it should have been credited to.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 02:05 AM
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reply to post by DarrylGalasso
 


Thank you for being amongst those who are willing to think deeper into what we are told, rather than taking things on face value. It means allot to me.

Yes, I too have seen those who thirst for control almost watering at the mouth to impose undesirable consequences on others.
From knowing these people as they progress into power, they have always had the desire to throw their frustrations on others. My experiences have led me to believe that those who hold a history of being intimidated, or feeling inadequate, often seek to turn the tables in a form of misdirected revenge.
They seek power so that they might attempt to impose that misdirected revenge without having to fear being "put back in their place" so to speak.

I feel almost sorry for these people.

I however, have never really felt intimidated. I view everything as being a result of events leading up to the present. There are no real enemies, only those who are misled, confused, damaged, and in their own way attempting to respond to their past.

Once you figure out what makes people "tick", you tend to begin to realize there is no real "evil", just misdirection. The resulting actions are often evil in nature... but the person in their own mind is just reacting as a cog might in a wheel.

Instead of feeling intimidated and desiring retribution, I've always just responded by doing what must be done, rather than what I feel I want to do.

The only time I feel like I need to respond with an emotion driven response, is when the event in question has little to do with me, and more to do with those I respect.


And I completely agree with you. When I have to inform someone they've been fired, or need "disciplinary" action taken, I too feel like I've failed them. I feel like I should have been able to find better ways of getting them motivated or concerned without having to let them go, or penalize them.

Luckily, I've found myself to be uncannily good at knowing which mental triggers to manipulate to get someone to feel, respond, or act a certain way...
... but even this form of manipulation (though it's in their best interest) leaves me feeling like I've used them in some way.


Aside: Funny how I don't mind saying this on a public forum, yet, I'd never talk about this with members of my team.

Unfortunately for us in commanding roles, it's as though some unspoken rule states that we simply cannot appear as though we have emotions.
We quickly learn to feel through those we are in charge of, rather than feeling our own emotions.

At least, that's how it goes for the true leaders.


As I said, those who seek power are already corrupted.
Those who reluctantly end up in power, you can trust with your life.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 02:30 AM
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I'll ad that if someone recognizes they are in authority and expect to stay in authority they may feel empowered to act good or bad as they are inclined. However, the real nature of corruption is to rob "leaders" of their independence with intimidation, degradation, blackmail, extortion, coercion, opportunity, etc.. Once compromised, it becomes difficult for anyone to regain a sense of "Power". For a figure like the President, for example, one of their first stripping of power in office is knowing the Secret Service knows and can relay their actions and intentions in advance of being able to act. IE the secret service acts as an informant for the "illuminati" keeping tabs on the president. That is beside the controls or conditioning that preceded their getting in office in the first place. For congress, fear of loosing their office and image and messing up their "opportunity" as well as having to earn their positions of authority make it very difficult for them to feel or become empowered.

The answer, of course, is to not be driven by "self interest" but by service and sacrifice to humanity. To care more for "others" than themselves and to thereby do the "right thing" without regard for their potential gains or losses. Service is closer to detachment and freedom where selfishness is closer to attachment and bondage.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 03:51 AM
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pending some reconsideration ....



[edit on 7-12-2008 by StellarX]


xul

posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 05:51 AM
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"Rather, new research based on experiments with college students who were primed to feel powerful suggests that, at least in some cases, power tends to shield people from outside opinions, leaving them to rely more on their own insights."

Ha haaaaaa... "at least in some cases"?
And students lol...yes, this are truly some uber powerful people.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 11:00 PM
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The website bent over backwards to make a sensationalist headline out of a perfectly good study. And a lot of you fell for it. If you actually read the story, you'll find the study isn't really about the corrupting aspect of power at all.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 11:28 PM
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reply to post by DarrylGalasso
 





On the very rare occasion I have to terminate someone, I usually feel as though I have failed them in some way, unless it is due to theft, in which case I see it as them firing themselves. I have found that the most difficult thing to do in this position is in fact to have to let someone go, I always think about the effect that it will have on their family and others around them, and it makes me feel really miserable, sometimes to the point I wish I had never went to college and just worked in a factory somewhere.


I know how you feel. As a college professor, I was also a student advisor. One of my students, who was quite a good student, seemed to be having some difficulty. After bringing the student into my office, and asking him if everything was alright, he told him of a family problem he was having. That's all I'll say about it, but in no way, was he the cause. Anyway, I tried to help him as best as I could, which meant giving him some financial help, and getting some assistance for him. In the process, he missed a few classes. Of course, I understood, but one of his other professors had failed him, even though he was normally a straight A student. With the student's permission, I went to the other professor, and briefly explained the problem he was having. The professor's response was rather shocking- he said that he could care less about people's problems. All he looked at were the grades, and assignments. All I had asked was to consider letting him make up a test that he had missed (for valid reasons, in my opinion.) His response to me was that I cared too much about the students, and that I should just teach, and avoid getting involved in trying to help students. It was at that point that I realized how callous some people were, people that were supposed to be helping students, but in reality, looked at those students as "just another number" in a grade book.
For me, however, it just made me double my efforts to address the entire student, not just the intelligence, but the entire person. Perhaps if everyone felt that way, it WOULD be a better world.




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