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250 badly eroded pyramids discovered in the Lambayeque valley in northern Peru

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posted on Dec, 4 2008 @ 04:06 PM
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In the 1890's a german engineer named Hanz Bruning (spelling?) discovered the Lambayeque valley in northern Peru where over 250 badly eroded pyramids had been overlooked. The largest of them was bigger than Khufu's great pyramid of Giza.
This video tells the story of the Lambayeque people, called that because they had no writing and nobody knows what they called themselves, how they built more pyramids than any other culture in history and eventually disapeared.

Google Video Link



posted on Dec, 4 2008 @ 05:23 PM
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Watching this now will reply
good find never heard of them.



posted on Dec, 4 2008 @ 05:26 PM
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Thanks for the information and the link!



posted on Dec, 4 2008 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by ashamedamerican
 


superb video....explanations are correct...this is a greath interesting mystery!



posted on Dec, 4 2008 @ 09:26 PM
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This is about the Chimu, Moche and Sican culture. They were centered in the Chicama, Moche, and Viru valleys in what is now NW Peru.

Chimu


Sican



posted on Dec, 5 2008 @ 06:08 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
This is about the Chimu, Moche and Sican culture. They were centered in the Chicama, Moche, and Viru valleys in what is now NW Peru.

Chimu


Sican

With all due respect can you provide any proof of this?
I saw no mention of the Chicama, Moche, and Viru valleys.
This says it was the Lambayeque valley, and that the reason they are called 'The Lambayeque People' is because they had no form of writing and nobody knows what they even called themselves.
Is it possible that you simply made a mistake?



posted on Dec, 5 2008 @ 06:50 PM
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Howdy AA


Lambayeque is a region in northwestern Peru, known for its rich Chimú, Sican and Moche historical past.

No idea why they would rename those known civilizations, they may have been using a blanket term for the various cultures found there.

Proof? Well Wiki is easiest but here is something more my style:

The valley




These are the questions addressed by our long-term research in the Lambayeque Valley. An initial survey located an ideal site to tackle the issue of specialization: The S sector (S166) of a 6 ha complex of agglutinated rooms along the ancient Taymi Canal on the Pampa de Burros dates to the Chimú period (AD 1350-1460); partially excavated in 1992, it produced evidence of specialized pottery production far from the centers of Chimú power and with no evidence of state interference. The larger N sector (S165) dates to the Middle Sicán period (AD 900-1100); here, a bottle mold fragment suggested the possibility of specialized crafts.


If the video was trying to sell itself they may have coined a new name to make it sound more mysterious



posted on Dec, 5 2008 @ 10:31 PM
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Thanks for the info

I may have misunderstood what they were saying.
I could have sworn that they said these people disapeared without a trace after.
I suppose it's also possible that more investigation was done after the video was made, which opened up new information.
I guess I'll have to watch it again.

Just so you all know there are alot of very interesting archaeology and cultural anthropology documentaries on google video, that may sound boring but you can actually learn alot of fairly interesting things from them.



posted on Dec, 6 2008 @ 03:56 PM
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Howdy AA

If you find anything interesting amongst those video let us know. One suggestion. When recommending a video write a short summary of what its about. More people will tend to view it if they have an idea whats in it.



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