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Persistent Pollutant May Promote Obesity

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posted on Dec, 2 2008 @ 03:13 PM
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Persistent Pollutant May Promote Obesity


www.sciencedaily.com

... The rise in obesity in humans over the past 40 years parallels the increased use of industrial chemicals over the same period. Iguchi and Katsu maintain that it is "plausible and provocative" to associate the obesity epidemic to chemical triggers present in the modern environment. Several other ubiquitous pollutants with strong biological effects, including environmental estrogens such as bisphenol A and nonylphenol, have been shown to stimulate the growth of fat storage cells in mice. The role that tributyltin and similar persistent pollutants may play in the obesity epidemic is now under scrutiny.
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 2 2008 @ 03:13 PM
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I decided to place this piece in the Breaking News section because I felt that the pertinence to several 'conspiratorial' theories makes it interesting to various schools of thought here on ATS.

If you wish, it can move to the Medical Issues board, where I fear it will get less attention than it deserves (in my opinion).


ScienceDaily (Dec. 2, 2008) — Tributyltin, a ubiquitous pollutant that has a potent effect on gene activity, could be promoting obesity, according to an article in the December issue of BioScience. The chemical is used in antifouling paints for boats, as a wood and textile preservative, and as a pesticide on high-value food crops, among many other applications.

Tributyltin affects sensitive receptors in the cells of animals, from water fleas to humans, at very low concentrations—a thousand times lower than pollutants that are known to interfere with sexual development of wildlife species. Tributyltin and its relatives are highly toxic to mollusks, causing female snails to develop male sexual characteristics, and it bioaccumulates in fish and shellfish.


It seems that the EPA, FDA, and NIH should be MUCH more interested in the long-term health effects of the product industry exposes us to than they demonstrate.

I am thankful that at least some researchers are willing to share the research showing how DOW, Monsanto, and the rest of the transnational corporations are slowly diminishing the quality of life for the human species in the name of the profit-making scheme they call 'progress.'

www.sciencedaily.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



 
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