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A Set Of Perfect Balls, A New Standard For The Kilogram

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posted on Jun, 18 2007 @ 11:12 AM
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A Set Of Perfect Balls, But They're One Kilo Each


www.theage.com.au

The project requires the development of perfect silicon spheres, and optical engineers at CSIRO's Australian Centre for Precision Optics — considered world leaders in the craft — are doing their part.

Scientists will use the spheres to determine how many silicon atoms make up a kilogram, and this will be used as the new definition — bringing the kilogram into line with other base units such as the metre and the second, which are all defined by physical constants.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.usnews.com






EDIT: Title for clarity


[edit on 18-6-2007 by UM_Gazz]

[edit on 18/6/2007 by anxietydisorder]



posted on Jun, 18 2007 @ 11:12 AM
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It turns out that the standard measure of a kilogram is starting to decay in a vault in France, but it was made in 1880.

These spheres will not decay, and will become the new standard to measure an exact kilogram down to the number of atoms they contain.

www.theage.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 18 2007 @ 01:05 PM
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Does silicone shatter? It would be a shame for some clumsy lab worker to drop one and shatter the kilo.

That's really interesting, I didn't know they were still using a bar of metal that had been cast in the 1800's.


apc

posted on Jun, 18 2007 @ 03:28 PM
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OK... uhm... the title reading "Perfect Spheres" would REALLY reduce a lot of unspoken confusion!



posted on Jun, 18 2007 @ 04:10 PM
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Catchy title there anxietydisorder!


Cool article, but I don't quite get why they need to create perfect spheres in order to count the atoms.



posted on Jun, 18 2007 @ 05:01 PM
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I can't wait until this project is completed and I can finally go to bed comfortable in the assurance that the kilogram has finally been atomically defined.

I can't tell you the anguish I've suffered as a result of this vagary.


[edit on 2007/6/18 by GradyPhilpott]


apc

posted on Jun, 18 2007 @ 07:08 PM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
Cool article, but I don't quite get why they need to create perfect spheres in order to count the atoms.



A spherical shape was chosen for the project because it has no edges that might be damaged, and the volume can be calculated by using its diameter.


I guess first though they need to figure out Pi.




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