It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Private sector 'to loan teachers'

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 28 2007 @ 01:08 PM
link   

bbc

And a spokeswoman for the National Union of Teachers said it was not "a one-way street".

"Private schools have a massive amount to learn from state schools.

"Teaching 30-35 pupils is very different from teaching 15 and requires a totally different set of skills and is much more demanding. That's the big problem that private school teachers will have," she said.




Coming from a public school like most us here that read this board,
I find this interesting as they are asking private schools to loan teachers to public schools. The problem I see is that these teachers are use to teaching -15 kids in a class and more disciplined kids unlike public schools where parents don’t do much.
In private schools the parents pay money to get their kids educated and ensure that their kids behave. Unlike public.

How would private sector teachers handle 25-35 kids in a class when they are use to -15 kids? I doubt they can handle the attitude of most students as well.


[edit on 28-5-2007 by bodrul]



posted on May, 29 2007 @ 02:56 PM
link   
Well, granted I don't know a whole lot about Britain's school systems, but this whole thing sounds absolutely idiotic to me.
Why are private schools given charity status? ANd why do they have to prove that they are bettering the community? Do public schools (I'm assuming they are publicly funded) have to prove that they are bettering the community? Hey, I got an idea, let's have the govt prove they are bettering communities.


And what do the teachers themselves think about this? Will they be required to relocate, work over time and do they have a choice? And why would anyone think private school teachers are better than public?
One other point: Generally, public school teachers make more money than private schools - so will they pay teachers more for teaching in public schools?



[edit on 29/5/07 by forestlady]



posted on May, 30 2007 @ 11:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by forestlady
Why are private schools given charity status? ANd why do they have to prove that they are bettering the community?


1) I suppose it's because if they didn't get charity status, they'd have to pay tax on their income.

2) Because private schools are quite varied in what they teach. For instance, if a faith school (which are all private schools - the British government won't create state-run faith schools) was teaching something inappropriate (I know there have been a couple of controversies over Saudi-funded Islamic schools at the beginning of this year, for instance, over some text books that sparked a debate about religious tolerance) that harmed the community then they can be closed.



posted on May, 30 2007 @ 12:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by forestlady
Well, granted I don't know a whole lot about Britain's school systems...........


- It sounds to me like we have a little (wholly understandable) confusion about the British public, private & state schools here.

In the UK 'public schools' are not the state schools funded by the taxpayer.

'Private' and 'Public' schools share more in common with each other (generally being the preserve of the wealthy & already priviledged) whereas state schools are the schools funded by general taxation.

Personally I'm all for the public & private school sector doing more to 'earn' their tax-advantaged status in the wider & general community.
The details are not really my greatest concern but the principle of reducing and/or removing the 'divide' such as it still is seems worthwhile.

A little less of the 'us and them' (when in reality there is only all of us) would be another little step of progress - particularly in a country like the UK which is still so mighily riven with a class divide......

.....and 'mockney' (lower) middle class people who get a kick out of pretending to be working class - or who are from working class roots and working class people who flatter themselves that they are middle class do not make the slightest bit of difference to those genuinely at the higher end of Britain's class divide.

(in fact I suspect they love the current situation, 'everyone' going about pretending there's no such thing as class in the UK just leaves them ignored to get on with a lifestyle of priviledge, wealth and security 'the little people' could only dream about.......provided they were ever encouraged to have a little real imagination in the first place.



posted on May, 30 2007 @ 03:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by Ste2652
For instance, if a faith school (which are all private schools - the British government won't create state-run faith schools)


I went to a CoE State school. There's plenty of State run faith schools all over the country.



posted on May, 30 2007 @ 03:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by bodrul

The problem I see is that these teachers are use to teaching -15 kids in a class and more disciplined kids unlike public schools where parents don’t do much.
In private schools the parents pay money to get their kids educated and ensure that their kids behave. Unlike public.


That's a bit of a generalisation there, Bodrul. Kid's in state run schools have parents that don't care, whereas private Student's parent's make them behave and have their interests at heart?

I contemplated sending my daughter private, but when they charge £2000/term, it was mildly outside of what I was prepared to pay, so she is going to a good state school nearby. Does that mean I don't care about her education?

I know you probably didn't mean it to come across like that, but I had to address it



posted on May, 30 2007 @ 07:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by stumason
That's a bit of a generalisation there, Bodrul. Kid's in state run schools have parents that don't care, whereas private Student's parent's make them behave and have their interests at heart?

I know you probably didn't mean it to come across like that, but I had to address it


sorry this is just from experience
i have been to 2 secondry schools francis bacon and marlbrough

both the kids were complete pricks and acted like morons

francis bacon my science class we had over 7 teachers ( none lasted more then an hour)

in some areas (not all) public schools are a doss and kids dont bother learning and their parents dont do anything. unlike private where their parents pay money they have no choice but to learn.


and private teachers i would expect them to be use to less disruptive kids and less so i dont see this working.



posted on May, 30 2007 @ 07:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by bodrul
in some areas (not all) public schools are a doss and kids dont bother learning and their parents dont do anything.


- bodrul I take it you are referring to state schools here?

Because in the UK "Public school" is something very very different to the schools the 'public' ie the general taxpayer, funds.

If you did mean the public sector state funded schools then it might be a good idea to refer to them as state schools seeing as 'Public School' is a catagory of very different school here in the UK.


and private teachers i would expect them to be use to less disruptive kids and less so i dont see this working.


- It's an area rife with generalisation but it's my view that ineffective teaching staff are to be found in all sectors of teaching,
in the same way as relatively ineffective people are to be found in various places in every walk of life.
I don't think they are especially common in one sector or another nor thankfully do I believe them to be common anywhere either.



new topics

top topics



 
2

log in

join