It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Chimps DNA more advanged than humans! *Study Finds*

page: 1
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 05:03 PM
link   
I was pretty shocked to read this artical claiming that chimps genes have evolved more than humans since the chimp/human split 6 million years ago.


The results, detailed online this week in the Proceedings of the large brains, cognitive abilities and bi-pedalism.

Jianzhi Zhang of the University of Michigan and his colleagues analyzed strings of DNA from nearly 14,000 protein-coding genes shared by chimps and humans. They looked for differences gene by gene and whether they caused changes in the generated proteins.


Another interesting tidbit:


There is still much to learn, the scientists say, about human and chimp evolution. “There are possibly a lot of differences between human and chimps that we don’t know about, [perhaps] because there are differences in chimps that nobody has studied; a lot of studies tend to focus on humans,” Bakewell said.


AAC


[edit on 17-4-2007 by AnAbsoluteCreation]

[edit on 17-4-2007 by AnAbsoluteCreation]



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 05:10 PM
link   
There is another discussion on this over here ATS: Chimps more evolved than Humans

Having read the article, I think this topic is a bit misleading. They simply talk about the number of positive genetic changes and not the total cumulative effect of those changes. Each species evolved in different directions to fit into a different niche in the environment. One would have to question calling a less intelligent, less adaptable, species, as more evolved.



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 05:16 PM
link   
Thsnks for the link. I thought this just broke.



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 06:33 PM
link   
Well of course the -DNA- is more evolved / perfected. We humans aren't efficient worth crap.
We're versitile, yes, but these guys have their genes perfectly cut out for their environment. As a result we humans probably suffer more decease, genetically linked ones anyway.

We're still smarter, meaning we can adapt more, but I don't bring into question their genes are more optimized. A chimps arm muscles, even if as big as yours, are probably a heckuva lot more efficient / stronger.



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 07:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by Drexon
Well of course the -DNA- is more evolved / perfected. We humans aren't efficient worth crap.
We're versitile, yes, but these guys have their genes perfectly cut out for their environment. As a result we humans probably suffer more decease, genetically linked ones anyway.

We're still smarter, meaning we can adapt more, but I don't bring into question their genes are more optimized. A chimps arm muscles, even if as big as yours, are probably a heckuva lot more efficient / stronger.

Very True!


AAC



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 08:02 PM
link   
Intelligence stems from spirit, our brain is configured to enable integration of a more complex spirit. That being said, my biology tells me the chimp is a superior organism, physically. It is indeed higher on the chain of evolution. I think the slowing of evolution in the human lineage is due to lack of considerable pressure to evolve in the environment. Our needs are met, I think. This would appear like a winning formula, and thus become static. My 0.02



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 09:12 PM
link   
OK lets look at it this way, 6 million years ago the evolutionary tree split, humans one way, chimps another. The chimps evolved from...... well, apes. Humans evolved from ... the same apes. Now, which one has gone through a greater change???

This study shows that chimps have had a great number of specialized micro changes to optimize their form and function. Humans have gone through major changes in size, upright stance, bipedal motion, brain mass increase, opposable thumbs, etc. In the article they state

The results could be due to the fact that over the long term humans have had a smaller effective population size compared with chimps.
This is a significant statement in regard to their findings. Given a larger population, there will be greater changes in DNA. This does not mean that Chimps are more evolved along the branch of the tree. It means that they found their niche and specialized. Humans, in a smaller population, evolved much farther along the branch and experienced a greater change since the split 6 million years ago. Today, Humans have managed to fit into a far wider environmental niche and our population far outnumbers the chimps who can only survive in limited environments.



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 09:36 PM
link   
Someone mentioned that primates have far more strength than humans. I think this has to do with the placement of the skeletal muscles.

Most primates are 4-8x stronger than the average man.

A 400lb silverback gorilla (whose biceps are attached from its shoulders to its forearms, bypassing the elbow joint) makes a neat exception at 20x. That's down to mechanical leverage.

Apparently they can press 4,600 pounds above the head. Not sure I beleive it but there you go.



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 09:44 PM
link   
I agree with SteveR, humans have/will not evolve as fast as other organisms just because we change our environment to suit us. If we couldn't change our environment, then we would need to evolve.



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 09:52 PM
link   
That's right. Nature works the same way on all levels. I began lifting weights years ago when I was 18 and kept a record of lifts. My maxes on everything have increased by 4 times. That's adapation to environment in the short term. If I never went to the gym, would my strength have changed in these years? I seriously doubt it.



[edit on 17/4/07 by SteveR]



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 10:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by SteveR
I began lifting weights years ago when I was 18 and kept a record of lifts.
[edit on 17/4/07 by SteveR]


You old soul you.


AAC



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 11:06 PM
link   
What? It is years ago


Mr "26th incarnation"




[edit on 17/4/07 by SteveR]



posted on Apr, 18 2007 @ 01:26 AM
link   
I have seen, and I belive it to be the Discver channel show that apes actuaully have more DNA stands then humans!

It just seens alittle odd that the human species, evovlved with less DNA than our ancesters, the monkeys?

Seems kind of rare i would think that an animal actually (monkey) that we evolved from would have more DNA strands than a human being?

I just don't understand how we have descended from the apes, and somehow ended up sooo much smarter than them!

We had the same DNA a millinium ago, So how did it happen in these "miilions" of years that we lost some of our DNA and now seem the most powerful/dangerous creature on earth.


The one question I always ask myself with this info, is

Does losing DNA naturally in this world and then coming out on top du you think this is evolutions work!?



posted on Apr, 18 2007 @ 01:37 AM
link   
Everything has the same number of strands. The double helix is an integral part to how it actually works. It's probably the perceived length that differs.

Hey AAC, what about DNA for a construct? How many years practicing with mailboxes gets us that advanced?



posted on Apr, 18 2007 @ 09:37 AM
link   
Oh yes, size is everything....



Physical vulnerabilities would necessitate invention and increase abstract ideation.



posted on Apr, 19 2007 @ 12:52 AM
link   
Every living organism has double stranded DNA as its genetic template, only viruses differ in that some use RNA. It is true that chimpanzees have 48 chromosomes while humans have 46 but this in no way reflects on the degree of genetic evolution or sophistication of the organism, most farm animals have more chromosomes than us, and butterfly's have 380. Furthermore its not like we are losing DNA, its postulated that over time the chromosomes fuse together to have reductions in number or are cleaved to produce greater numbers.
I think what this article is saying is that from our common ancestor the chimp's DNA has changed more over that period of time than our own has. This isn't saying all that much though since 99% of our genome is the same as the chimps. What makes the difference between our species are very subtle differences in genes. There is something of a point that chimps and in fact any wild animal have more efficient genomes that we do. Over time we have reduced the selective pressures on human society and genetic predispositions that would get weeded out in the wild are passed down with us. Just take how many people need eyeglasses and contacts in current society compared to 2000 years ago. If people couldn't see then they couldn't work, couldn't support a family, and most likely didn't have any offspring. Today we treat these things easily, but its removing the selective pressures on our genome that used to be there.



posted on Apr, 20 2007 @ 04:44 PM
link   
I have observed one of those Silver back Gorrillas in a zoo and there mass is something to marvel at.There strength is phenomenal, I watched him take that heavy frame over to an underground passage and lift a steel hatch that probably weighs up to more than 450lbs and throw it up like a lid on a tuppleware.You have to see them in action to appreciate there form.They are beautiful they act with the wind at there command and ask no questions only judgment based on their impact of movement.
Yeah he through that steel latch with one arm, kind of scary how much power is in the compound of that frame structure.A denser bone for a denser enviroment.



posted on Apr, 22 2007 @ 04:25 AM
link   
i did a quick search on ATS and on the web and there are some intriguing aspects:

Source


Scientists at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute have discovered that a 23-year-old female chimpanzee named Ai, who lives at the center, has mnemonic capabilities on a par with those of human adults. The experiments that established the chimp's memory span were conducted by Professor Tetsuro Matsuzawa and research fellow Nobuyuki Kawai of the institute, which is located in the city of Inuyama, Aichi Prefecture. Ai has displayed remarkable mental powers in many previous experiments, and the latest round of tests confirmed her intelligence yet again. The researchers published their findings in the January 6, 2000, issue of the English-language scientific magazine Nature.

Understanding the Concept of Zero
In one experiment, several single-digit numbers were displayed simultaneously on a computer screen, and Ai was asked to choose the smallest number. When the figures 0, 1, 4, 6, and 9 appeared, for example, Ai touched the 0. The other four numbers were then covered with squares, and Ai was asked to touch these squares in the order of the hidden numbers' values, from smallest to largest. She was able to do this highly accurately.




then lets compare:

www.spookyfilms.com...


The monkeys were almost error-free when comparing groups with up to eight objects, but faltered when challenged with nine.


with

www.scienceweek.com...


The author report an investigation of Ai's memory span by testing her skill in numerical tasks. The authors point out that humans can easily memorize strings of codes such as phone numbers and postal codes if they consist of up to 7 items, but above this number of items, humans find memorization more difficult. This "magic number 7" effect, as it is known in human information processing, represents an apparent limit for the number of items that can be handled simultaneously by the human brain.



keep in mind that apes living in zoos do not have the advantage of an intact society and that most experiments are designed to test not to teach. i wonder how well an isolated human being would perform under similar circumstances. anyway, most animal species do not get proper credit, especially for their cognitive abilities,

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Apr, 22 2007 @ 07:05 AM
link   
Sadly, the way the internet community age averages are dropping more and more every day. I have naturally been exposed to many more "different minded" people. This finding doesn't surprise me one bit! The other day, I taught a 19 year old how to calculate the average of three number.

Funny, but sad


Cheers.



posted on Apr, 22 2007 @ 07:58 AM
link   
Now when I think about it, I remember reading about a parrot who had a remarkably high human vocabulary. What really astounded them was that it could form primitive sentences. This was discovered when it (he/she?) stumbled upon a picture of its owner with a chimp, and it uttered "Who's the chimp, mom?".




top topics



 
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join