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Warming could spark N. American water scramble: U.N.

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posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 06:28 AM
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Warming could spark N. American water scramble: U.N.


www.reuters.com

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Climate change could diminish North American water supplies and trigger disputes between the United States and Canada over water reserves already stressed by industry and agriculture, U.N. experts said on Wednesday.

More heat waves like those that killed more than 100 people in the United States in 2006, storms like the killer hurricanes that struck the Gulf of Mexico in 2005 and wildfires are likely in North America as temperatures rise, according to a new report that provided regional details on a U.N. climate panel study on global warming issued in Brussels on April 6.
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 06:28 AM
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This theory has been brought up by many people. Channel Four in the United Kingdom showed the effects of what could happen to North America regarding water supplies.

I'll try and find it


www.reuters.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 06:34 AM
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we can expect Canada to be added on the Axis of Evil list very soon...




posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 06:37 AM
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That's why we must join in a North American Union to avoid conflicts right?


Another BS from the UN.



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 06:42 AM
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Sorry but it's hard for me to think about a drought right now when it's a blizzard outside in April no less!



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 07:19 AM
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Originally posted by infinite


More heat waves like those that killed more than 100 people in the United States in 2006, storms like the killer hurricanes that struck the Gulf of Mexico in 2005 and wildfires are likely in North America as temperatures rise




I'm not saying Global Warming isn't happening, but when the "global warming experts" present evidence that has been happening for countless centuries, it...well...doesn't seem like much evidence.


apc

posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 07:42 AM
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As with any urgent issues, when the need becomes great enough a breakthrough occurs. These water issues just increase the demand for new desalination methods or improved economy of distilling. There is far too much water on this planet to get in a fuss over what little of it is fresh.



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 03:42 PM
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I recall hearing about some conflicts with the first nations of Canada back several years ago when they wanted to mine copper in the Crandon area of wisconsin regarding water issues. If I can find it I will post it, but since the mine is no longer an issue it may not be available any more.

EPA Mentions Canada but not the exact one I was looking for

Wis DNR

Keepers of the waters

I think the ones that mention the first nations are no longer up

[edit on 4/12/2007 by shots]

[edit on 4/12/2007 by shots]



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by RetinoidReceptor
I'm not saying Global Warming isn't happening, but when the "global warming experts" present evidence that has been happening for countless centuries, it...well...doesn't seem like much evidence.

Not to pick on you, per se, but it is unfortunate that the term 'Global Warming' seems to trigger this type of response in a lot of people. Water usage/supply is an issue that has been around for a while now and has existed independantly of general climate issues. Two examples from the US I would pick are extraction from the Rio Grande and the Ogallala aquifer.

I would guess that any shift towards a drier climate will only exacerbate these problems. Of course, whether any such shift will occur or not remains to be seen.



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 04:03 PM
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dont worry we will have enough water for everyone when we go to upstate new york and melt that 12 feet of snow they got this past winter lol.



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 04:17 PM
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Data taken from the USGS WaterWatch page.

Map shows current streamflow conditions for various water gaging stations accross the US. Current levels are shown as a percentage of historical 'norm' for locations with 30 or more years worth of data.

From Wikipedia -



Streamflow, or channel runoff, is the flow of water in streams, rivers, and other channels, and is a major element of the water cycle. It is one component of the runoff of water from the land to waterbodies, the other component being surface runoff. Water flowing in channels comes from surface runoff from adjacent hillslopes, from groundwater flow out of the ground, and from water discharged from pipes.



Edit : Map Legend unclear

From Left To Right

Red : Low.
Brown : 90. Much Above Normal.
Black : High.

[edit on 12-4-2007 by KhieuSamphan]



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 04:54 PM
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Folks, I heard a story on the local am station the other day that the majority of privately owned municiple water companies in the US had been or were in the process of being bought by foreign conglomerates, in particular Thames Water in the U.K. These big companies were spending thier dollar buying the stock but fell short on keeping up the infrastructure..and I'm guessing they aren't planning on it any time soon.

You can draw your own conclusions but I already have and I have gone through a huge box of crayons. Translation, I am keeping my well and keeping it heavily guarded.



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 04:59 PM
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Here's a similar groundwater monitoring facility for the US. Again, supplied by the USGS -




Historical data can also be gleaned for individual boreholes. Here is an example, data from Stafford County Well, Kansas -



It is important to note, however, that water levels can go up as well as down.



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 05:13 PM
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Originally posted by astrocreep
... the majority of privately owned municiple water companies in the US had been or were in the process of being bought by foreign conglomerates...


Taken from Wikipedia, a well know incident related to privatisation of water supply -



The Cochabamba protests of 2000, also known as "The Cochabamba Water Wars" were a series of protests that took place in the Bolivian city of Cochabamba between January and April 2000, because of the privatization of the municipal water supply, which was sold to a private company, International Waters Limited (IWL) of London (a subsidiary of Bechtel Corporation; it operated locally as Aguas de Tunari), at the insistence of the World Bank.




Demonstrations erupted when Aguas de Tunari imposed a large rate increase, reportedly to finance the Misicuni Dam project, a week after taking control of the Cochabamba water supply system. In a country where the minimum wage was less than US$70 per month, many dwellers were hit with monthly water bills of $20 or more.


Martial law...Corporate propaganda! It sounds like an NWO conspiracists dream -



Four days into the demonstrations, the government declared martial law. Police arrested protest leaders, taking them from their beds in the middle of the night, shutting down radio stations in mid-broadcast. Soldiers took over control of the streets. On April 8, the military shot 17-year-old Víctor Hugo Daza in the face, killing him. IWL officials claimed that the protests were riots sponsored by coc aine producers against a crackdown on coca production.


I wasn't actually aware of the outcome, but I guess 'people power' really can work, to some extent -



However, on April 10, the government finally conceded, signing an accord that agreed to every demand the protesters had made.

In 2001, the Bechtel Corporation filed a claim against Bolivia in order to recover its investment; the request was deposed before the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), a court dependent of the World Bank. After four years of protest by various groups, on January 19 2006 Bechtel reached agreement with the government of Bolivia, dropping their case in return for a token payment.




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