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2 simple questions

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posted on Apr, 10 2007 @ 09:03 PM
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i have two simple questions which was problably asked 300 times on ats:

1) are all people on this earth with the last name mason a Mason?

2) deos your last name have to be mason?

thank you. ur replies would be greatful



posted on Apr, 10 2007 @ 11:17 PM
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No and No. I have never met a Mason named Mason.



posted on Apr, 11 2007 @ 07:59 AM
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There are three main types of surnames, to my knowledge:

1) Surnames which once indicated a profession: Mason, Carpenter, Fletcher, Archer, Smith, Farmer, Clark, Hunter, etc.

2) Surnames which might describe a particular physical attribute of an ancestor: Blue (eyes?), Brown, Black (hair?), etc.

3) Surnames which might define where one is located, often found in Dutch names such as "Van (blank)", or in German as "Von (blank)" -- both meaning "of (name)". I believe Irish names "O'(name)" also mean "Of (name)" as well.

Other names might describe their relationship to their parent, found in Scandinavian (non-Finnish) names: Stevenson, Ericson (Son of Steven, Son of Eric), or Scottish names: I also believe "Mc"/"Mac" names have the same meaning/use, and somewhere down the line, instead of constantly changing the last name with each generation, someone decided to claim the name permanently.

Someone with the last name of Mason likely had some very distant ancestor who was a mason, not a Freemason, but a bricklayer/stoneworker.

Hope this helps,

-Z



posted on Apr, 11 2007 @ 08:02 AM
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Originally posted by Zhenyghi
There are three main types of surnames, to my knowledge:

1) Surnames which once indicated a profession: Mason, Carpenter, Fletcher, Archer, Smith, Farmer, Clark, Hunter, etc.

2) Surnames which might describe a particular physical attribute of an ancestor: Blue (eyes?), Brown, Black (hair?), etc.

3) Surnames which might define where one is located, often found in Dutch names such as "Van (blank)", or in German as "Von (blank)" -- both meaning "of (name)". I believe Irish names "O'(name)" also mean "Of (name)" as well.

Other names might describe their relationship to their parent, found in Scandinavian (non-Finnish) names: Stevenson, Ericson (Son of Steven, Son of Eric), or Scottish names: I also believe "Mc"/"Mac" names have the same meaning/use, and somewhere down the line, instead of constantly changing the last name with each generation, someone decided to claim the name permanently.

Someone with the last name of Mason likely had some very distant ancestor who was a mason, not a Freemason, but a bricklayer/stoneworker.

Hope this helps,

-Z


Fascinating! I always wondered where last names came from, that kinda makes sense!



posted on Apr, 11 2007 @ 08:03 AM
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I only met one Mason that was a Mason.

I do have to say your avatar is the funnest one I have ever seen.



posted on Apr, 11 2007 @ 09:32 AM
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thanks because my last name is mason and i was was wondering if it was an automatic in for me.. lol



posted on Apr, 15 2007 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by Zhenyghi
There are three main types of surnames, to my knowledge:





Most names can be traced back only to about the 1400s though can't they? Thats a long ways back but still its kind of disapointing to think thats just about 8 to ten grandpas ago.



posted on Apr, 15 2007 @ 09:57 PM
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I'm a telemarketer so I've called thousands of people across Canada and can recall a persons last name was Mason...

/7A



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 08:48 AM
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Originally posted by Voyager1
Most names can be traced back only to about the 1400s though can't they? Thats a long ways back but still its kind of disapointing to think thats just about 8 to ten grandpas ago.


My surname (classified) has been traced back to the 1300's (earliest known documentation of my surname). My particular surname is of the descriptive type, but the actual meaning and origin is in dispute.

I've seen surnames of Byzantine nobility and aristocracy back well before the 1300's, and another (place-name), Jesus "of Nazareth" (also, for that matter, Pontius Pilate - in Latin, "Pontius Pilato") predate that even more.

So, to answer your question, I would say no, surnames can be found well before the 1400's, but surnames in such antiquity would be reserved for, in my opinion and limited study, to the well-known and upper classes. Surnames for "common folk" likely seem to come later on in time.



posted on Apr, 17 2007 @ 08:50 AM
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PS - Eric the Red, and his son, Leif Ericson (Leif, "Son of Eric") are from circa 1000-1100?..

Just another example of pre-1400 surnames...

-Z



posted on Apr, 18 2007 @ 07:31 AM
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The first historical record of my last name dates to a Judge in Munich. However, my last name can be traced back to tribal Germany.

Some last names, depending on one's ethnic background, are far older than you think.



posted on Apr, 18 2007 @ 07:54 AM
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I have a Germanic occupational surname that is the modern equivelent of "Cooper" that goes back to Roman times.



posted on Apr, 18 2007 @ 07:26 PM
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Where is a good place to find out the orgins of your last name. Mine is Patzer, I know it's german, but I think it would be interesting to find out how that name was formed. Patzer has nothing to do with any kind of occupation or anything that I know of.



posted on Apr, 18 2007 @ 07:43 PM
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Last names were invented when taxes were invented. So the tax collectors could know who had been extorted, and who had not. Which is why Baker and Smith are more common than Custombikebuilder and Tattooartist...



posted on Apr, 19 2007 @ 06:42 AM
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Originally posted by thexsword
Where is a good place to find out the orgins of your last name. Mine is Patzer, I know it's german, but I think it would be interesting to find out how that name was formed. Patzer has nothing to do with any kind of occupation or anything that I know of.


Did a Google search on "Patzer", since my command of German has fallen into disuse. Here's what I found:

"'Patzer' is derived from the German word meaning 'bungler'. In chess, a patzer is someone who doesn't know what they are doing."

Probably not what you wanted to hear!



posted on Apr, 19 2007 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by Zhenyghi


Probably not what you wanted to hear!


Man, you KofC's sure are party poopers.




posted on Apr, 20 2007 @ 06:28 AM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
Man, you KofC's sure are party poopers.


Well, you know...since you Masons don't have a unified, central command, you can spend your time feasting and drinking and having ritualized group-sex with models ala "Eyes Wide Shut" in between your plots for global domination.

Since KCs have a single Supreme Council, we have to send in reports about how many of our enemies we've burned, flayed, boiled, impaled, eviscerated, or bludgeoned on our way to global domination.

[edit on 20-4-2007 by Zhenyghi]



posted on Apr, 20 2007 @ 07:44 PM
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Originally posted by Zhenyghi
Since KCs have a single Supreme Council, we have to send in reports about how many of our enemies we've burned, flayed, boiled, impaled, eviscerated, or bludgeoned on our way to global domination.


Thanks for reminding me Z.

April is almost over and I'm way under quota on burning, flaying and impaling.

Darn.



posted on Apr, 21 2007 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by ucanneverdie
i have two simple questions which was problably asked 300 times on ats:

1) are all people on this earth with the last name mason a Mason?

2) deos your last name have to be mason?

thank you. ur replies would be greatful


The *grass* tastes better in the booze, so do stop smoking so much of it.

Sweft



posted on May, 9 2007 @ 12:55 AM
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I think if Perry Mason would have been a 'real person' he most definatley would have been an actual Mason.
He is a fictional person yet still remains the only person named Mason I have ever heard of.

My name is not Mason and it better not 'have to be' because then I would be breaking the rules..............but I am not a Mason either so I guess the rules do not actually apply to moi.



[edit on 9-5-2007 by theRiverGoddess]




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