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The Real Reason The Missile Hit Poland

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posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

The European Union has a system in place that can detect even small IR sources from space. Besides all the systems watching for missile plume IR signature launches from space.

The European Union by now knows exactly where it came from. And I wager to say that these are the ones advocating for it being an accident or even saying it was not coming from a place occupied by Russians.

And so does the US and Russia.


edit on 17.11.2022 by TDDAgain because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Or like Zaphod said earlier, there was nothing else for it to lock onto in the area...



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: putnam6

Most likely it was a missile fired in the air defense mode. I'm not 100% certain, but I believe that if the missile misses its target in the air, it can lock on to secondary targets, and doesn't differentiate between something on the ground, or in the air. It just sees a target that meets its parameters, and locks on. It used to be that it would keep going until it ran out of fuel, and self destructed. But with them having secondary targeting capabilities now, I believe that if they lose their initial target, they simply look for a second target.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

makes me wonder if a high value target was in the area like say (for example)? the UKs sky sabre deployment..



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Zaphod58

Two questions.

Has it been observed that Russia has used the missiles to hit targets on the ground?


Yes. The last few weeks Russia has been using them in some of their strikes. Russian weapons stockpiles are running low. It's a war, and they're going through weapons fast, so they're turning to alternative uses of some weapons.


And are there systems that do periodic diagnostics to make sure they’re still in good operating order? I imagine many of these are Soviet Surplus.


Part of the maintenance process is to inspect targeting systems.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: TDDAgain

the UK has deployed sky sabre to the border so whatever it is would have been tracked and the info shared with Poland.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

You aren't talking about an unguided rocket. This wasn't a case of someone randomly firing a rocket, and it miraculously hit the tractor. This was a missile that has a radar guidance system that saw the tractor as a large radar return and tracked it. The odds are much better when you have a missile with a guidance system.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: TDDAgain

Even if this had come from Russia, the odds of anyone saying it was anything but an accident are really low.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 12:10 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Makes sense because at this point, Russia would have nothing to gain. Even the most anti-Russia people here acknowledge that very fast. Besides that, yes, the Russians would never admit, agreed.

What is the most reliable / used sensor in such a missile? Is it IR or can they go after electronic signatures too? There would not be a lot of those since these tractors are diesel and lack a high frequency ignition system that really sputters some EM radiation around.

Would it be IR? If so then the people around are really lucky the plume from their chimneys was not enough for it to lock onto a house or similar.


edit on 17.11.2022 by TDDAgain because: diesel needs to be written lowcaps



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 12:23 PM
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originally posted by: FauxMulder
a reply to: IAMTAT

Or like Zaphod said earlier, there was nothing else for it to lock onto in the area...



Maybe it was looking for movement and a thermal signature against the cold winter ground and surroundings...which is why it targeted the tractor with a hot engine and warm bodies aboard.
edit on 0PMNovCSTPMCST by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: TDDAgain

Surface to Air Missile systems are radar guided. Smaller systems like MANPADS are IR guided, but the larger systems like the S300/S400/Patriot/NASAMS are all radar guided. Infrared tracking systems are too short ranged to see targets beyond about 50-60 miles, unless everything is absolutely optimal. Some missiles do have the ability to track EM signatures as well as radar guidance. Those are usually air to ground missiles though, not surface to air. Next generation air to air missiles use a dual mode seeker, with one being IR, and the other UV or EO. It allows far more accurate targeting. But again, it's short range due to the IR seeker.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

The S300 doesn't use an IR seeker. The on board radar saw the tractor as the biggest target in the area, and locked onto it. It didn't care about heat, or if the target was moving. It just saw something that matched its parameters and locked on to it.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thank you for that detailed answer.

I am just curious what would make that tractor a target. So if it's radar then probably because it was moving relative to the ground?

Add: Okay saw your other post. Just trying to understand how a computer would decide it to be a target. So optical then?
edit on 17.11.2022 by TDDAgain because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thanks for that very technically- knowledgeable answer.

Do you know if operators would have had any heads up of the missile going off course, it's flight path...or where it landed?
Can this be monitored in real time?

Also...would there be a self-destruct option available to operators?
edit on 0PMNovCSTPMCST by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: TDDAgain

The radar is programmed to look for a return that is beyond a certain size, and lock on to it. Once it has that target, it doesn't look for others, or at anything but that target. Once it lost the target it was launched at, it simply started looking for something that crossed the threshold required to lock on to. The tractor has enough metal in it that it's a pretty good size radar reflector that crossed the threshold.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

Could be The Ukrainians that misprogrammed the guidance whatnot... If the case.


NATO’s top official said Wednesday that a deadly explosion in Poland was likely caused by a Russian-made Ukrainian air defense missile after an initial investigation, lowering the temperature a day after the incident stoked fears over a possible escalation in Russia’s war with Ukraine.


I think more likely the missile missed it's original target and trashed itself into a Polish grain farm.

I don't know how this missile works if it misses its target (assuming it was trying to shoot down something) so that could be BS.

Definitely a rogue surface-to-air missile.

Reminds me of this:


edit on 17-11-2022 by Degradation33 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

It does have a "manual mode" that would allow the operator to observe, or even guide the missiles, but it's more common for it to be used in automatic mode, where the missile is fired and does its own guidance.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thank you for explaining, I was not aware about metal and radar signatures. I was just thinking about movement detection.




posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: TDDAgain

Large masses of metal, and right angles make great radar reflectors. If you look at stealth aircraft, when they're flying in non combat situations, they carry what are known as Luneburg lenses. It's basically a metallic structure that bolts on to the top and bottom of the aircraft, and increases their radar signature. If you look at pictures of the F-35, just ahead of the tails on the top of the fuselage, and underneath the fuselage at the same point, you'll see two small squares. Those are their lenses.



posted on Nov, 17 2022 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

Oh FFS.

The lengths people will go to ...

To defend Nazi false flags...




edit on 11/17/2022 by MykeNukem because: eh?




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