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A calorie is not a calorie - Dr Chris Knobbe on industrial vegetable oils / seed oils. obesity

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posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 03:20 PM
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Dr. Chris Knobbe - 'Diseases of Civilization: Are Seed Oil Excesses the Unifying Mechanism?

'


Saw this yesterday. Great presentation posted in 2020. Just over a million views.

Covers the history of various maladies and charting with the rise of vegetable oils.

Talks about several different cultures around the world to show that vegetable oils / PUFAs / Un-saturated fats are the culprit.

Talks about numerous studies from the past.

One notable study shows that not all "calories" are the same. Talks about Omega 6.

If you're "data-driven" or "want to see the science" you might enjoy this video.



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: dontneedaname
It's not only the vegetable oil. As you speak of Omega fat acids, for example it's said eat fish, it has omega 3. Only wild fish will have it, not the farmed ones. Same for roaming and wild animals. All the while, there is no differentiation between caged animals and wild animals when it comes to Omega fat acids.



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 03:46 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDamnDuckAgain
a reply to: dontneedaname
It's not only the vegetable oil. As you speak of Omega fat acids, for example it's said eat fish, it has omega 3. Only wild fish will have it, not the farmed ones. Same for roaming and wild animals. All the while, there is no differentiation between caged animals and wild animals when it comes to Omega fat acids.



That's a good point as well. Pasture raised / grass-fed is best as you know. I did buy some "Cage-free" simple truth eggs recently, they state 100 mg Omega-3 per egg. I usually by pasture raised though as I know "cage-free" is still crappy / un-natural.

I just bought a "Free-range" Nellies dozen. The package states 70mg of omega-3. Not sure why the cage-free has more, as free range is better then cafe-free if I recall.

The brand I buy the most is HAPPY EGG though. Can't find omega-3 info on their website. gonna ask them.

as for fish - does farmed fish have ZERO omega-3? or minimal? i've never researched that.



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: dontneedaname

I just buy eggs locally. Walk through some free roaming chickens when I approach the self-serfing shop. You take what you need and throw it into a bowl, get your change out. They don't tell me anything about the amount of Omega-3 and I wonder how it can be guaranteed. I don't care honestly because they look good, smell good, taste good, nice orange and I know what they feed (although they can always add something...).

I feel like this "my eggs have 80mg" "ha! my eggs have 100mg" leads to a unhealthy environment where nature's products are tried to be standardized. It's already done in the EU, if a banana does not have a certain bending angle or shape, it is not classified as banana. Read that again to let it sink in.

Soon there might be the same situation, where cold hard numbers decide if you perfectly good product is worth nothing, because of pencil pushers and control freaks that get off on their kink regulating everything.

Know it sounds old and beaten through the bushes but I strongly recommend:
Network. Oh you have eggs, milk, honey and meat? I can sew clothes, distill oils and fix your engines (example). I said this in 2020 already during the first lockdowns and supply breakdowns, here on ATS.

Network like you never did before. It can not hurt.



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 07:03 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDamnDuckAgain
a reply to: dontneedaname
It's not only the vegetable oil. As you speak of Omega fat acids, for example it's said eat fish, it has omega 3. Only wild fish will have it, not the farmed ones. Same for roaming and wild animals. All the while, there is no differentiation between caged animals and wild animals when it comes to Omega fat acids.


So, farmed animals are chemically alien creatures?



And some oils, such as olive oil, have millennia of use to prove that they are acceptable as foods. However, that does not remain the case if they are treated chemically to enhance shelf-life, or to change their appearance.

Basically, if an oil does not go rancid or degrade, then it probably isn't too bio-compatible.



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 07:16 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDamnDuckAgain
a reply to: dontneedaname


I feel like this "my eggs have 80mg" "ha! my eggs have 100mg" leads to a unhealthy environment where nature's products are tried to be standardized. It's already done in the EU, if a banana does not have a certain bending angle or shape, it is not classified as banana. Read that again to let it sink in.

Soon there might be the same situation, where cold hard numbers decide if you perfectly good product is worth nothing, because of pencil pushers and control freaks that get off on their kink regulating everything.



That's a good point. There are some farmer's markets near me, but it's not part of my routine. Don't know if they even sell eggs. Cost prohibitive for me anyway from the prices I've seen. I don't live rural enough to get from someone directly.

I got an answer from Happy Egg - they said about 50-75 mg as well. Which leads me to wonder if the 100mg O3 egg, they are feeding them something different?

Interesting story about the banana.....

regardless...I'm supplementing O3, short of eating fish and tons of vegetables everyday, not going to get enough at this time. Though I've drastically cut consuming any veg oils - whether from grocery store or eating out. Eating out..I think the best strategy is to just avoid fried foods completely. Yesterday I learned Little Caesars uses soybean oil in their crusts. Goodbye Little Caesars.
Just learned a major Asian market here with a ready made food bar for takeout, they use SOYBEAN SALAD OIL.

prob like this:

owensborograin.com...

Refined, Bleached, and Deodorized Soybean Oil

or

www.bakersauthority.com...

This zero-trans fat soybean oil is highly refined and bleached. It has a minimal aroma and flavor which makes it a versatile all-purpose oil.


Yummy! Deodorized!



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut


So, farmed animals are chemically alien creatures?

That's not my claim but your conclusion.

As with everything, the amount determines the toxicity. Just because olive oil is one of the good ones, does not make it true that all vegetable oils are good for us.

But I agree, with such additives or treatment so it does not go rancid, something smells fishy about healt and it is not the vegetable oil.



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: dontneedaname

As far as I know from being around hunters talk, it's mostly the movement and staying out over night that is supposed to enhance Omega 3 (not sure about Omega 6) in wild roaming animals. Even cows outside on the Alm might produce it if they are able to, therefor.

For me I found that the price of eggs is justified. I pay 3.50€ for 10 eggs. That's 35c for an egg. Instead of eating two soft eggs, I am satisfied with one soft egg, because the egg yolk tastes a lot better, looks a lot better and I eat more conscious. Also the eggs are bigger than medium size and need less on every recipe, so it kind of makes up the price.

Eggs are high value items for me because they are so versatile for cooking, also baking. I rather pay a bit more than have fish taste and smell in my eggs yolk because they feed fish bone powder and stuff. Yuck!

Also you get meat at such from these places. If you wanted and the farmer has a butcher's day, you could even pick that chicken that always stares at you feisty and challenging. If you manage to identify it


And the best at last, no masks, a friendly talk sometimes and a different feeling than buying from a sterile super market. When I crack those eggs I know they were raised a few km from here, know the conditions they were raised and also buying it is different. Things then become more meaning as just grabbing a pack of eggs from the shelf.

There you get it from the producer. You see the animals and also think twice wasting something. I said it before that in my opinion everyone who wants to eat meat, should, until they are 14 years old, at least have raised, slaughtered, prepared and eaten an animal.

That would stop a lot of children and later grown ups to scoff at a piece of meat that is "too fatty" "too less fatty" "a blood vessel stares at me, won't eat this". I just want to add, that I only think that way, because I went through that. Without it I probably would not see the value or lesson doing it.

But once you are wrist deep in a rabbit or elbow deep in a hog cutting out internals who's intestine will still move a bit and contract while it's already in the butcher's bin and have touched your face, blood on your hands, getting under the fingernails and sides... mhm.... you learn to value butchered meat.




posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 08:29 PM
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We have cut down considerably on most seed oils over the years, and the wife and I have gotten healthier as we are getting older. I also cut down on high fructose fruits, but only certain ones. That helped. I started taking glutamine, just five hundred mg in the morning and evening and my joint pain went down along with inflammation. The side effect was that most of my cravings for sweet stuff disappeared for some reason...without even trying in any way. So we do not make or buy nearly as much sweets, but the wife did not start this so her cravings are still there, she is just benefitting by the reduction of grain oils in the diet. We still use corn oil for doing our frenchfries at home though, and we now use more of the lite olive oil instead of the vegetable oils. Now a forty eight ounce veggi oil lasts us almost six months.

But we do eat more butter now and we do use a shortening which is made from both animal and plant fats. We also use fat rendered from the suet from our organic half cow we bought. We won't touch the extra version olive oil...both of us really dislike it. I eat olives, she does not, if I want that taste I will have a few olives on my salad.

I don't mind peanut oil used for some things, but would rather eat peanuts for that taste. The peanut butter we use does have some soybean oil in it, but we don't eat a whole lot of that anyway and our bodies can detox some of that chemistry. We do not eat much highly preferred food but we figure that one meal a week of junk food is not going to kill us.

the seed oils are not good for us, but a little will not kill us. Fructose is not good for us in excess, even from natural sources, but a little won't lead to fatty liver disease or metabolic syndrome. I like fish but the wife only likes it once a week, I could eat it three times a week...and sometimes do. I have always liked the wild caught fish that come from waters that are not too polluted, so we try to buy those for what we use. Another thing is that fish from cool or cold waters tastes much better, the fish from polluted warm water tastes like crap and so does farmed fish usually. So it is not for health reasons that we buy wild caught fish.......it is taste and texture. I do not like tuna that much but we do buy tuna in a can and mix it with miracle whip in sandwiches or salads to cover up it's taste. Tuna is a warmer water fish I think.



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 08:48 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDamnDuckAgain
a reply to: dontneedaname

As far as I know from being around hunters talk, it's mostly the movement and staying out over night that is supposed to enhance Omega 3 (not sure about Omega 6) in wild roaming animals. Even cows outside on the Alm might produce it if they are able to, therefor.



Thanks for that detail! Maybe it has something to do with the COLD?


rickymouse - thanks for the insight on cold vs warm water fish. farming vs wild.

That makes sense...I know WILD SALMON in USA often comes from Alaska...cold water. I equate WILD SALMON with high O3.

Tuna - I think in the warmer Atlantic / Mediterranean or mid-latitude Pacific. I don't associate tuna w/ high O3.


chiefhealth.us...

[just comparing serving sizes...salmon has a lot more then tuna]

I've read SARDINES have a lot of O3 too. Not sure how it compares to Salmon though. Too lazy to look now. SARDINES I also associate with cold water. The South Africa sardine run comes to mind.

--

Just now learning about high levels of PUFA / O-6 in various NUTS. Which is surprising to me.



posted on Feb, 17 2022 @ 09:26 PM
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www.holistichelp.net...

Carbohydrate, MUFA and PUFA Content of Nuts and Seeds

best summation I've seen.



posted on Feb, 18 2022 @ 01:09 AM
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a reply to: dontneedaname

A couple of chickens and a small patch of yard space is all that's needed for sustainable egg supply. If you only eat eggs a couple times a week, one chicken may do. I'm getting close to buying another chicken it's been some time. The kids would find it fun no doubt to go out in the morning and collect the eggs.



posted on Feb, 18 2022 @ 01:20 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: dontneedaname

A couple of chickens and a small patch of yard space is all that's needed for sustainable egg supply. If you only eat eggs a couple times a week, one chicken may do. I'm getting close to buying another chicken it's been some time. The kids would find it fun no doubt to go out in the morning and collect the eggs.


but if you don't have a yard....

if you travel a lot or semi-frequently....no pets either. Don't like taking care of animals. Prefer wild animals.

Now, if I had a yard here of some substance, might be a different story.




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