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A question about immunity for ATS

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posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 12:59 PM
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originally posted by: Thenail

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: ZeussusZ

The vaccines promote 'natural' immunity creating antibodies to the spike protein, which is the most immunogenic feature of the virus.

For example, the biggest immune response to the 'natural' virus, is to the spike protein which presents itself on the very most outer parts of the virus. It is the most obvious part of the virus for out immune system to detect. It is also the best target for a vaccine, that is why EVERY vaccine company has based their vaccines on the spike protein.

It is 'natural' immunity to the virus that begins to reduce after 3-7 months. Because 'natural' immunity is neither perfect, nor forever (and it never was, for any disease, that is why they are still diseases).

The same reduction goes for vaccinated immunity.

This is also why some people get COVID-19 more than once (even some people here on ATS have had the virus more than once, and some of those ATS members have also been rather strident about never getting the vaccine, despite being living proof that natural immunity hasn't protected them).


It’s rare to get covid twice , that’s what the cdc says . They can’t lie about that .Testing positive twice happens quite a bit because the tests are garbage and not accurate whatsoever. Half the people testing positive have no symptoms they just had a false positive. People had immunity from the Spanish flu for a 100 years . Pfizer is living in your head rent free


"Rare" does not mean that it doesn't happen. There are several who have posted on ATS that they have had COVID-19 twice, with symptoms, and also confirmed by test.

Also, a very low percentage of people tested are likely to be false positives. The most usual cause of a false positive test is contamination of the sample. With good conformance to established procedures, it is possible to maintain a low false positive rate. The current estimated rate of false positives in rtPCR testing for COVID-19 in the UK is between 0.8% and 4.3% of positive tests.

False positivity rate of the COVID-19 PCR test

Also, due to the infectiousness of the 1918 'Spanish' flu, the majority of people in the world had caught it and had gained some immunity by 1920, after which, its worst effects were reduced. During the three years at the peak of the pandemic, the case mortality ratio for the 1918 flu was 3%. It killed so many because of its infectiousness, not because of a high case-mortality.

As a comparison, COVID-19 has had a worldwide average CFR of 1.8%, and that is with 100 years better medical technology moderating its effect.

edit on 4/1/2022 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn
in reply to: tanstaafl
I agree with a lot of what you say, but I would include that we should also eat regionally appropriated.

I'll allow that there may be some very small minority of people with long standing genetic differences wherein they do much better with some plant foods and/or carbs, but the vast, vast majority of people that is not the case, and the species appropriate diet for them - us - is the flesh and fat of ruminant animals. Essentiall, carnivore.

The minimum daily requirement for dietary carbs is a whopping ZERO.


Some studies have shown that people that eat honey produced by bees in their own local areas, have less allergy symptoms.

Yes, but honey is sugar, and loaded with carbs.


I believe that exotic foods may take some of the boredom out of our meals, but I think a diet of foods local to the area where you live, provide us better health benefits. All things in their region and in their season.

It seems logical, yes, but the flesh and fat of ruminant animals really doesn't vary in any significant way from one region to another...



posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: TrollMagnet

Biology is not Microbiology. My cousin keeps complaining that they hire Biologists at his lab who know nothing about the microbiological side of things. In any case.

www.nebraskamed.com...

Read that article. It talks about how natural immunity is spotty. While vaccine immunity is more consistent. How natural immunity can fade in 90 days sometimes. Vaccine immunity can last at least 6 months.

In any case I'll take a microbiologists or immunologists word on it.



posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: TrollMagnet

Biology is not Microbiology. My cousin keeps complaining that they hire Biologists at his lab who know nothing about the microbiological side of things. In any case.

www.nebraskamed.com...

Read that article. It talks about how natural immunity is spotty. While vaccine immunity is more consistent. How natural immunity can fade in 90 days sometimes. Vaccine immunity can last at least 6 months.

In any case I'll take a microbiologists or immunologists word on it.


This is all from a study of 72 people. Come on



posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 08:40 PM
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originally posted by: Ksihkehe

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: ZeussusZ

It is 'natural' immunity to the virus that begins to reduce after 3-7 months. Because 'natural' immunity is neither perfect, nor forever (and it never was, for any disease, that is why they are still diseases).


Virus and disease are not interchangeable, nor do we have the ability to generate natural immunity for all diseases. Natural immunity being perfect and forever would not prevent disease from existing, so it's certainly not the reason diseases still exist.

COVID is going to become endemic. A seasonally spiking endemic disease most likely. When you have natural immunity it fades, but with an endemic pathogen you're likely to be exposed and receive the benefit of your immune response thus staying naturally immune. On the other hand, if you take a vaccine that has no long term studies with a gene altering component, who the hell knows if your immune response will react properly in 5 years.


I agree that SARS-CoV-2 is going to become endemic. The 1918 'Spanish' flu did over just 3 years, and it has about the same CFR, and about the same infectivity as SARS-CoV-2.

However, no vaccines currently available are gene altering. That part is BS.


A few of us tried to tell you. Boosters for life. Get it tattooed on your arm. Bewstaz4lyfe, that's your new crew.


If the virus becomes endemic and even more benign, as it is clearly already doing so in ways similar to other viral pathogens like the 1918 flu, why would anyone require boosters?

Your arguments contradict each other.

Vaccines would only be required in the interim, up until it becomes endemic and we all catch it periodically/seasonally.



posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 10:06 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Ksihkehe

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: ZeussusZ

It is 'natural' immunity to the virus that begins to reduce after 3-7 months. Because 'natural' immunity is neither perfect, nor forever (and it never was, for any disease, that is why they are still diseases).


Virus and disease are not interchangeable, nor do we have the ability to generate natural immunity for all diseases. Natural immunity being perfect and forever would not prevent disease from existing, so it's certainly not the reason diseases still exist.

COVID is going to become endemic. A seasonally spiking endemic disease most likely. When you have natural immunity it fades, but with an endemic pathogen you're likely to be exposed and receive the benefit of your immune response thus staying naturally immune. On the other hand, if you take a vaccine that has no long term studies with a gene altering component, who the hell knows if your immune response will react properly in 5 years.


I agree that SARS-CoV-2 is going to become endemic. The 1918 'Spanish' flu did over just 3 years, and it has about the same CFR, and about the same infectivity as SARS-CoV-2.

However, no vaccines currently available are gene altering. That part is BS.


A few of us tried to tell you. Boosters for life. Get it tattooed on your arm. Bewstaz4lyfe, that's your new crew.


If the virus becomes endemic and even more benign, as it is clearly already doing so in ways similar to other viral pathogens like the 1918 flu, why would anyone require boosters?

Your arguments contradict each other.

Vaccines would only be required in the interim, up until it becomes endemic and we all catch it periodically/seasonally.


www.reuters.com...< br />


Both the Moderna and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines use new messenger RNA (mRNA) technology, which contains instructions for human cells to make proteins that mimic part of the novel coronavirus.


It causes human cells to make new proteins. Would you prefer if I said it alters gene expression? Bypasses it? To me altering or bypassing expression is still altering genes. The semantics don't really interest me, the lack of long term studies does.

It's unknown how this will impact your ability to develop immunity to future variants. So far Omicron doesn't bode well for the vaccinated having robust immune response to newer variants. It's quite possible that over time your immune system will be disrupted beyond just COVID variants.

We don't know. That should terrify people, but because of completely skewed risk perception fueled by pharma beneficiaries in positions of power nobody even asked once they said "safe and effective".



posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 11:00 PM
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originally posted by: Ksihkehe

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Ksihkehe

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: ZeussusZ

It is 'natural' immunity to the virus that begins to reduce after 3-7 months. Because 'natural' immunity is neither perfect, nor forever (and it never was, for any disease, that is why they are still diseases).


Virus and disease are not interchangeable, nor do we have the ability to generate natural immunity for all diseases. Natural immunity being perfect and forever would not prevent disease from existing, so it's certainly not the reason diseases still exist.

COVID is going to become endemic. A seasonally spiking endemic disease most likely. When you have natural immunity it fades, but with an endemic pathogen you're likely to be exposed and receive the benefit of your immune response thus staying naturally immune. On the other hand, if you take a vaccine that has no long term studies with a gene altering component, who the hell knows if your immune response will react properly in 5 years.


I agree that SARS-CoV-2 is going to become endemic. The 1918 'Spanish' flu did over just 3 years, and it has about the same CFR, and about the same infectivity as SARS-CoV-2.

However, no vaccines currently available are gene altering. That part is BS.


A few of us tried to tell you. Boosters for life. Get it tattooed on your arm. Bewstaz4lyfe, that's your new crew.


If the virus becomes endemic and even more benign, as it is clearly already doing so in ways similar to other viral pathogens like the 1918 flu, why would anyone require boosters?

Your arguments contradict each other.

Vaccines would only be required in the interim, up until it becomes endemic and we all catch it periodically/seasonally.


www.reuters.com...< br />


Both the Moderna and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines use new messenger RNA (mRNA) technology, which contains instructions for human cells to make proteins that mimic part of the novel coronavirus.


It causes human cells to make new proteins. Would you prefer if I said it alters gene expression? Bypasses it? To me altering or bypassing expression is still altering genes. The semantics don't really interest me, the lack of long term studies does.


But it just doesn't alter any of your genes. For this reason, you can't truthfully say it is 'gene altering'.

LOL.

Also, we consume large amounts of RNA (and DNA) wrapped in lipids, all the time. We call it 'eating food'. You also can't call that 'gene altering' either.


It's unknown how this will impact your ability to develop immunity to future variants. So far Omicron doesn't bode well for the vaccinated having robust immune response to newer variants. It's quite possible that over time your immune system will be disrupted beyond just COVID variants.

We don't know. That should terrify people, but because of completely skewed risk perception fueled by pharma beneficiaries in positions of power nobody even asked once they said "safe and effective".


We have decades of general knowledge about how we handle these sorts of biological products. No-one goes nuts over the potential issues of eating a new strain of rice, or of a new paracetamol formulation or soluble aspirin, because we know how these things work.



posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 11:21 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Thenail

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: ZeussusZ

The vaccines promote 'natural' immunity creating antibodies to the spike protein, which is the most immunogenic feature of the virus.

For example, the biggest immune response to the 'natural' virus, is to the spike protein which presents itself on the very most outer parts of the virus. It is the most obvious part of the virus for out immune system to detect. It is also the best target for a vaccine, that is why EVERY vaccine company has based their vaccines on the spike protein.

It is 'natural' immunity to the virus that begins to reduce after 3-7 months. Because 'natural' immunity is neither perfect, nor forever (and it never was, for any disease, that is why they are still diseases).

The same reduction goes for vaccinated immunity.

This is also why some people get COVID-19 more than once (even some people here on ATS have had the virus more than once, and some of those ATS members have also been rather strident about never getting the vaccine, despite being living proof that natural immunity hasn't protected them).


It’s rare to get covid twice , that’s what the cdc says . They can’t lie about that .Testing positive twice happens quite a bit because the tests are garbage and not accurate whatsoever. Half the people testing positive have no symptoms they just had a false positive. People had immunity from the Spanish flu for a 100 years . Pfizer is living in your head rent free


"Rare" does not mean that it doesn't happen. There are several who have posted on ATS that they have had COVID-19 twice, with symptoms, and also confirmed by test.

Also, a very low percentage of people tested are likely to be false positives. The most usual cause of a false positive test is contamination of the sample. With good conformance to established procedures, it is possible to maintain a low false positive rate. The current estimated rate of false positives in rtPCR testing for COVID-19 in the UK is between 0.8% and 4.3% of positive tests.

False positivity rate of the COVID-19 PCR test

Also, due to the infectiousness of the 1918 'Spanish' flu, the majority of people in the world had caught it and had gained some immunity by 1920, after which, its worst effects were reduced. During the three years at the peak of the pandemic, the case mortality ratio for the 1918 flu was 3%. It killed so many because of its infectiousness, not because of a high case-mortality.

As a comparison, COVID-19 has had a worldwide average CFR of 1.8%, and that is with 100 years better medical technology moderating its effect.


I know what rare means . You rarely go into something with an open mind . I want the truth . I have no agenda whatsoever. There are several on ats that claim they’re aliens or napoleon , doesn’t mean much .

No there is actually a ton of false positives. Hell they were saying half the people who test positive have no symptoms. No symptoms or false positive ? Seems like false positives. Not sure why you want to be Pfizer’s spokesperson .

By the way it’s mutated enough that it’s not bad at all . Your job on here warning us all of the horrible covid is over . You did it . Good job , on to the next one !



posted on Jan, 4 2022 @ 11:29 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: ZeussusZ

Scientists say. Covid natural immunity doesn't last as long as the vaccine. And that the vax gives better protection vs covid than natural immunity.

If you have a problem with this, go argue with the scientists. Don't shoot the messenger.


There isn't any real scientist that would say something that ignorant. What scientists said this? Names please. Oh, you have no idea, just that the buzzwords, "scientists say" pushed in all the media, so roll over and be a "Believer" (In propaganda).. (And poorly contrived propaganda at that).
edit on 4-1-2022 by NoCorruptionAllowed because: edit



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 12:11 AM
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This is what I found - natural immunity lasts 3 months to 5 years. Link

My story… I had Covid in Feb. 2021 or thereabouts. Never knew I had it until I got a bad rash a few months later. Derm recognized it as “post Covid” rash and did an antibody test. It was positive. Tbh, I’ve always kind of doubted that test because again, I never had Covid symptoms except for the later rash.

Fast forward to now. I am not able to get the vax due to a past history of GBS. At least, it’s not advisable because of that risk again. A week ago my husband and two sons test positive for Covid, as does my entire department at work. We assume it’s Omicron because it’s been pretty mild for all.

When I was administering the (positive) home test to my son, he accidentally sneezed right on me. I assumed I would be next to test positive so we quarantined them at home but I didn’t quarantine from them. I have no symptoms and have tested negative twice. I am pretty sure at this point, I am not going to get it (again).

Yet, I’ve heard of others (ironically, most that are vaxxed) having Covid multiple times. I personally know of a few others like me, who seem to have longer term immunity. Therefore, I guess I am one of those on the longer end of the natural immunity range linked above.

For info purposes, I am A+ blood type, a bit overweight since menopause, 51, female. Smoked 30 years. Quit 6 years ago but vape. Low blood pressure. Low cholesterol. No health issues really except fibromyalgia. But that’s been better since menopause. I take D, Liposomal C, Quercetin, Zinc, and Prozac every day.

Want to see something trippy? Do a search on “Prozac and Covid.” They’ve known (real sources like NIH, Harvard, Mayo, etc) that Prozac reduces Covid severity, hospitalization and death risk considerably, since April 2020. I found that info and posted it here in ATS a long time ago. Doctors are now just admitting this in media but again, there’s tons of real medical data about that since almost the beginning of the Pandemic. Makes me so angry to think of how many ppl it could have helped and even lives it could have saved. BUT Prozac is $5 for 30 pills so not enough money in it. GRRRRRR
edit on 5-1-2022 by nicevillegrl because: Sp



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 12:41 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Ksihkehe

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Ksihkehe

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: ZeussusZ

It is 'natural' immunity to the virus that begins to reduce after 3-7 months. Because 'natural' immunity is neither perfect, nor forever (and it never was, for any disease, that is why they are still diseases).


Virus and disease are not interchangeable, nor do we have the ability to generate natural immunity for all diseases. Natural immunity being perfect and forever would not prevent disease from existing, so it's certainly not the reason diseases still exist.

COVID is going to become endemic. A seasonally spiking endemic disease most likely. When you have natural immunity it fades, but with an endemic pathogen you're likely to be exposed and receive the benefit of your immune response thus staying naturally immune. On the other hand, if you take a vaccine that has no long term studies with a gene altering component, who the hell knows if your immune response will react properly in 5 years.


I agree that SARS-CoV-2 is going to become endemic. The 1918 'Spanish' flu did over just 3 years, and it has about the same CFR, and about the same infectivity as SARS-CoV-2.

However, no vaccines currently available are gene altering. That part is BS.


A few of us tried to tell you. Boosters for life. Get it tattooed on your arm. Bewstaz4lyfe, that's your new crew.


If the virus becomes endemic and even more benign, as it is clearly already doing so in ways similar to other viral pathogens like the 1918 flu, why would anyone require boosters?

Your arguments contradict each other.

Vaccines would only be required in the interim, up until it becomes endemic and we all catch it periodically/seasonally.


www.reuters.com...< br />


Both the Moderna and the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines use new messenger RNA (mRNA) technology, which contains instructions for human cells to make proteins that mimic part of the novel coronavirus.


It causes human cells to make new proteins. Would you prefer if I said it alters gene expression? Bypasses it? To me altering or bypassing expression is still altering genes. The semantics don't really interest me, the lack of long term studies does.


But it just doesn't alter any of your genes. For this reason, you can't truthfully say it is 'gene altering'.

LOL.

Also, we consume large amounts of RNA (and DNA) wrapped in lipids, all the time. We call it 'eating food'. You also can't call that 'gene altering' either.


It's unknown how this will impact your ability to develop immunity to future variants. So far Omicron doesn't bode well for the vaccinated having robust immune response to newer variants. It's quite possible that over time your immune system will be disrupted beyond just COVID variants.

We don't know. That should terrify people, but because of completely skewed risk perception fueled by pharma beneficiaries in positions of power nobody even asked once they said "safe and effective".


We have decades of general knowledge about how we handle these sorts of biological products. No-one goes nuts over the potential issues of eating a new strain of rice, or of a new paracetamol formulation or soluble aspirin, because we know how these things work.


Do any of the things you cited cause the expression of a pathogen spike protein from your cells? You know as well as I do that digestion isn't the same as injection and a new strain of rice is a silly comparison. I'll eat a couple COVID vaccines, but I won't inject one.

You can say it's fine. The history of science is chock full of examples of unintended consequences that destroyed ecosystems, ruined lives, and got people killed, all while people said it's fine. You can't say it's safe long term because there is no data, none. You will be the data. If this was smallpox with a 30% mortality it would be 100% worth the risk. A mortality of a fraction of a percent is not. There is no informed consent, no attempts to provide people reasonable risk comparisons, and there is no excuse for it.

I've studied lots of science, including the failures. This has all the hallmarks of a disastrous failure. It has a perceived sense of urgency, suppression of information, lots of money up for grabs, and the real kicker... the abject arrogance of the people that present the "solution".



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 12:50 AM
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Is the word "rarely" used to describe Covid-19 infections occurring in the vaccinated?

"Rarely" is used to describe how often Covid-19 infections show up in those who have Immunity, due to being previously infected.

www.cdc.gov...

The only thing better than "rarely" is "never".

These Covid "shots" pretending to be vaccines, can't come close to neither level of success.



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 08:52 AM
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originally posted by: ZeussusZ
Hello, I have a question that I can't seem to find a answer so I'll ask here.
If a person catches covid19 and recovers they have natural immunity. Then the person gets the vaccine for covid as advised by the authority's. 4 to 6 months later a booster shot is needed because antibodies/spike protein/ protection/ whatever is gone.
Does this mean the vaccine has taken away the natural immunity?


No, natural immunity doesn't work that way (just like the vaccines it's protective, not sterilising ) and coronaviruses rapidly mutate. Studies show re-infections were found to occur within two months prior to the introduction of the vaccines.

Those who have a combo of vaccine induced and natural immunity (known as hybrid or super-immunity) have far better protection than just natural immunity or vaccine induced immunity alone.

Boosters are only really needed for those over 50 or with poor immune systems as they're at much higher risk and the older people are the quicker natural or vaccine induced their immunity wears off and the lower chance of them haveing an immune response to the virus or vaccine -



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 11:35 AM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: TrollMagnet

Biology is not Microbiology. My cousin keeps complaining that they hire Biologists at his lab who know nothing about the microbiological side of things. In any case.

www.nebraskamed.com...

Read that article. It talks about how natural immunity is spotty. While vaccine immunity is more consistent. How natural immunity can fade in 90 days sometimes. Vaccine immunity can last at least 6 months.

In any case I'll take a microbiologists or immunologists word on it.


The argument you are trying to make is extremely wrong, to put it as nicely as I can. That argument is born in fantasy, not science. I dont know what you are reading, but it is a blatant lie.

You clearly have no clue what you are talking about and are falling for propaganda. I spent years of my life with a Phd Molecular Biologist at Cornell and have understood these things long before COVID. I have hung out in labs, picked brains, and been an extreme nerd my entire life studying this stuff since the 90's. I guess thats why I easily recognize all the lies floating around out there masquerading as fact.

Natural immunity is the gold standard and will always outperform vaccines, and by that I mean legitimate vaccines, not mRNA BS. You are falling for an argument about ONE TYPE of antibody that has a strong reaction due to the VOLUME of vax that is injected. It is NOT a stronger response, it is the exact same response for that one protein as if you got sick. The difference is the VOLUME of the response, the amount measured. A complete immune response involves many types of antibodies, and no mRNA triggers that type of response, not even close.

As a matter of fact, the only reason the Moderna vax is the "most effective" is because it delivers the highest volume of vax to you. Its the same as the others, you just get more. Same reason and logic people are getting "boosters" It is the exact same thing. They are trying to use volume to trigger strong response.

ALl they have is this vax because they have destroyed all treatment options for the EUA. The people deciding on boosters and lockdown do not have the education to eve understand what they have or how it worse. To them it is a hammer, and COVID is a nail. They are no different than if you gave a hammer to a 3 year old. Its all nails. They have no clue what they are doing, they just have this one tool they are throwing at everything. And worse of all, there is a bunch of propaganda like what you are spreading that are blatant lies.

Your argument is not even plausible. The vax does not trigger a complete immune response. This is not even college level biology. 11 and 12th grade advanced student in high school doing college prep know this stuff.
edit on 5-1-2022 by TrollMagnet because:



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 11:43 AM
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originally posted by: ZeussusZ
a reply to: TrollMagnet

So you get life long immunity after recovering from covid.
But if you take the vaccine then you don't have lifetime immunity, hence the need for boosters.

So.....
Does the vaccine wipe out natural immunity?



You do not lose existing immunity. People smarter than I are arguing that the immune system is getting overworked by the vax response. This is messing with the T-Cell response that normally keeps viruses you have previously encountered suppressed. Like Chicken Pox when you were a kid is not shingles now.

Very intelligent people (getting censored) are arguing that the once your immune system has been abused by the vax, it has a harder time functioning as it should. Part of it I heard is because the vax goes in your blood, but COVID normally lives in your respiratory system. We are infecting organs with a respiratory disease in amounts that would never naturally reach those areas.

VAIDS may turn out to be a real health concern for those who got the jab in a year or two when it can no longer be covered up. But with what we know now, there is not reason to think the vax will impact natural immunity, but it definitely increases your risk of side effects from the vax if you have been previously infected and take the shot.



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: ZeussusZ

I'm a respiratory therapist and I got covid in December of 2020. Confirmed positive with "test results" and a loss of taste I've never experienced before in my life. Since then, I've cared for hundreds of Covid positive patients.

I remember thinking and boasting that I've had colds that hit me harder and I have had moderate to severe asthma since childhood. I never got the shot to this day. I have religious exemption for my hospital. I even put in religious exempt for the flu shot because I've lost all faith in vaccines.

I always wear an n95 when interacting with suspected patients. I smell covid positive patients nasty breath every single day at work through those n95s. They cough on me, drool on me and sweat on me, the unvaxxed RT.

Haven't been sick a single time since Dec2020.

Sorry I can't answer your question about if vaccine takes away immunity after infection.. I can say for sure that natural immunity is something to be thankful for. Why risk damaging natural immunity with experimental Mrna??
edit on 5-1-2022 by Sahuarokid because: Forgot to add i haven't been sick since dec2020



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: Sahuarokid

I worked shock trauma for a number of years. It was a while back, but even with my advanced level of nursing skills, I never had a patient on a ventilator without a respiratory therapist at my side.

So how is it today that staff that have never worked in an advanced care unit, or with a ventilator patient before, is considered proficient enough to manage ventilator patient?

Just interested in knowing if things have really changed that much since I worked the advanced care units.



posted on Jan, 5 2022 @ 09:59 PM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn
a reply to: Sahuarokid

Just interested in knowing if things have really changed that much since I worked the advanced care units.



I am too green to give much insight into any of the changes in icu practices over time... I only just passed my boards in 2020.

Issues like you mentioned seem to come down to the number of quality staff assigned. At my hospital 1 RT will be assigned 10+ vented patients to look after. Which I'm sure you know is not a safe thing. This is considered a normal thing now.

Core staff is almost not a thing anymore. With most of the staff being out of state travelers, it also creates situations where someone will get assigned to something they are not at all prepared for. Who's to blame there? The travel agency, the Healthcare traveler, the hospital who fired core staff in favor of travelers, Staffing, Ceos, lawmakers?



posted on Jan, 6 2022 @ 01:13 AM
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originally posted by: TrollMagnet

Very intelligent people (getting censored) are arguing that the once your immune system has been abused by the vax, it has a harder time functioning as it should. Part of it I heard is because the vax goes in your blood, but COVID normally lives in your respiratory system. We are infecting organs with a respiratory disease in amounts that would never naturally reach those areas.


Exactly. Covid as a virus does not infect areas of the body that the vaccine with the spike protein infects.

Covid also does not breach the blood-brain barrier and is not found in the brains of those who have died of Covid on autopsy.

BUT the viral vectors used to make the vaccine (which contain the spike protein), the vaccines do breach the blood-brain barrier and the Covid spike protein is found in the brains of those vaccinated, especially those who had blood clots in the brain after vaxxed.



posted on Jan, 6 2022 @ 10:01 AM
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The op brings to mind a study that came out last summer.

COVID recovery gave Israelis longer-lasting Delta defense than vaccines



The authors, led by Dr. Sivan Gazit, deputy head of Maccabi’s research arm, noted that their study is significant for taking a wide time-frame and using a large data sample. They wrote: “Our large cohort, enabled by Israel’s rapid rollout of the mass-vaccination campaign, allowed us to investigate the risk for additional infection — either a breakthrough infection in vaccinated individuals or reinfection in previously infected ones — over a longer period than thus far described.”

Cohen said of the study: “The data presented is important and can draw a kind of immune hierarchy. From the most protected to the less, there are vaccinated convalescent, convalescent, then vaccinated and then preople who choose not to vaccinate, who are the most vulnerable.


I prefer to rely on my immune system without the treatments. An old-school approach to this doesn't incur the risks of a jab out of a bad batch. The study hasn't been peer-reviewed, hopefully moving forward the true hierarchy will become more obvious...
edit on 6-1-2022 by dffrntkndfnml because: grammar




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