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Astronomer finds planet 9 searching in IRAS data.

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posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 11:07 AM
link   
an article about the planet X.

A planet (beyond the orbit of the dwarf planet Pluto) whose existence has been hypothesized but not confirmed was found using iRAS data.

"A search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data"

Michael Rowan-Robinson (Imperial College London)
(Submitted on 6 Nov 2021 (v1), last revised 11 Nov 2021 (this version, v2))

I have carried out a search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data. At the distance range proposed for Planet 9, the signature would be a 60 micron unidentified IRAS point source with an associated nearby source from the IRAS Reject File of sources which received only a single hours-confirmed (HCON) detection. The confirmed source should be detected on the first two HCON passes, but not on the third, while the single HCON should be detected only on the third HCON. I have examined the unidentified sources in three IRAS 60micron catalogues: some can be identified with 2MASS galaxies, Galactic sources or as cirrus. The remaining unidentified sources have been examined with the IRSA Scanpi tool to check for the signature missing HCONs, and for association with IRAS Reject File single HCONs. No matches of interest survive.

For a lower mass planet (< 5 earth masses) in the distance range 200-400 AU, we expect a pair or triplet of single HCONs with separations 2-35 arcmin. Several hundred candidate associations are found and have been examined with Scanpi. A single candidate for Planet 9 survives which satisfies the requirements for detected and non-detected HCON passes. A fitted orbit suggest a distance of 225+-15 AU and a mass of 3-5 earth masses. Dynamical simulations are needed to explore whether the candidate is consistent with existing planet ephemerides. If so, a search in an annulus of radius 2.5-4 deg centred on the 1983 position at visible and near infrared wavelengths would be worthwhile. "

complete article, pdf file:
arxiv-export-lb.library.cornell.edu...

arxiv abstract:
arxiv-export-lb.library.cornell.edu...

other video:
youtu.be...

edit on 11111111 by lux666 because: (no reason given)

 

Mod Note: IMPORTANT New old Standards Are Being Enforced again For New Threads
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edit on Wed Nov 24 2021 by Jbird because: (no reason given)


+1 more 
posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 11:22 AM
link   
a reply to: lux666

Your title should be "Astronomer Searches for Planet 9, Finds Something He Thinks Is Interesting But Needs Further Research."



posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 11:42 AM
link   

originally posted by: lux666
an article about the planet X.

A planet (beyond the orbit of the dwarf planet Pluto) whose existence has been hypothesized but not confirmed was found using iRAS data.

"A search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data"

Michael Rowan-Robinson (Imperial College London)
(Submitted on 6 Nov 2021 (v1), last revised 11 Nov 2021 (this version, v2))

I have carried out a search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data. At the distance range proposed for Planet 9, the signature would be a 60 micron unidentified IRAS point source with an associated nearby source from the IRAS Reject File of sources which received only a single hours-confirmed (HCON) detection. The confirmed source should be detected on the first two HCON passes, but not on the third, while the single HCON should be detected only on the third HCON. I have examined the unidentified sources in three IRAS 60micron catalogues: some can be identified with 2MASS galaxies, Galactic sources or as cirrus. The remaining unidentified sources have been examined with the IRSA Scanpi tool to check for the signature missing HCONs, and for association with IRAS Reject File single HCONs. No matches of interest survive.

For a lower mass planet (< 5 earth masses) in the distance range 200-400 AU, we expect a pair or triplet of single HCONs with separations 2-35 arcmin. Several hundred candidate associations are found and have been examined with Scanpi. A single candidate for Planet 9 survives which satisfies the requirements for detected and non-detected HCON passes. A fitted orbit suggest a distance of 225+-15 AU and a mass of 3-5 earth masses. Dynamical simulations are needed to explore whether the candidate is consistent with existing planet ephemerides. If so, a search in an annulus of radius 2.5-4 deg centred on the 1983 position at visible and near infrared wavelengths would be worthwhile. "

complete article, pdf file:
arxiv-export-lb.library.cornell.edu...

arxiv abstract:
arxiv-export-lb.library.cornell.edu...

other video:
youtu.be...


After all that, it could be a mini black hole. Many theories put a mini black hole far beyond Pluto as a puzzle piece that would explain away a lot of things that have been observed.

There could be mini black holes all over, and we might not even know. Would also explain a huge part of the dark matter mystery if we could find a way to directly observe them.



posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 02:02 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: lux666

Your title should be "Astronomer Searches for Planet 9, Finds Something He Thinks Is Interesting But Needs Further Research."


Yup, this title is ‘quite’ misleading.. Pretty anticlimactic reading the OP after seeing the title..



posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 04:34 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: lux666

Your title should be "Astronomer Searches for Planet 9, Finds Something He Thinks Is Interesting But Needs Further Research."


BINGO!

I am going to add that the "share it with my friends factor" is at about a 4 on a scale of 10. It is worth noting and I am not a naysayer, but it needs further research is up there for me too. I have a couple of planet X believing friends who will be interested, and I will see if they have heard of this yet.



posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 05:41 PM
link   
ok, noted.
my mistake.

I copied the title it was in other site.

in the pdf article he said he was working since the 1980's in searching and analyzing the data.
I added directly the pdf ,so, you, the experts could verify the source directly.


the time to edit the name of the topic passed.

thank for your corrections


edit on 11111111 by lux666 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: TrollMagnet


ok,
good to learn new things



posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: lux666

Bleh ... Clcikbait



posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 05:55 PM
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originally posted by: lux666
I copied the title it was in other site.

the time to edit the name of the topic passed.


Yes, the dreaded clickbait headlines! My sympathies. Thank you very much for posting the link to the article. I love to see good, real science at work.




posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 06:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: lux666
ok, noted.
my mistake.

I copied the title it was in other site.

in the pdf article he said he was working since the 1980's in searching and analyzing the data.
I added directly the pdf ,so, you, the experts could verify the source directly.

the time to edit the name of the topic passed.
If you asked nicely, you might get a moderator to change it for you.


thank for your corrections
You already had lots of clues the youtube title (which you copied) was wrong without waiting for our comments. Listen to the first minute of the youtube video with that title. He reads the titles of two other sources, neither of which says they found planet 9 like his title on the youtube video says. So those were the first two clues Leak Project is an unreliable source.

The other major clue was your other link, from the scientist. The scientist is always a better source for what the scientist did, than some science writer who will often get things wrong because they are not scientists and sometimes don't understand the science. The scientists paper is titled:

"A search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data"

That would be a perfectly good title for this thread, and it looks like that's where you got the quotes from, this link:

arxiv-export-lb.library.cornell.edu...

While the mod is changing the title, you should also ask them to add the ex tags to your quoted material, which you were supposed to do. There's a regular quote mark at the end, but no quote at the beginning of the quote, so you at least need another quote symbol at the beginning of the quote. ATS prefers EX tags:

External Source Tags - Please Review This Link.


originally posted by: rigel4
a reply to: lux666

Bleh ... Clcikbait

Yes, the title on the youtube video that was copied to this thread is a clickbait title.
But the paper by the scientist, named "A search for Planet 9 in the IRAS data", doesn't have a "clickbait" title. That would be the more accurate title to use.



posted on Nov, 24 2021 @ 08:56 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

thank you!

I didnt know that it was possible to do it.

i just requested those changes.



posted on Nov, 25 2021 @ 01:37 PM
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