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Double Train Crash Injures 12 As Emergency Services Rush To Scene

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posted on Nov, 3 2021 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: Skada

Just because its implausible don't make impossible.

Its a recognised phenomenon, you see when wet soggy leaves fall on the lines they can reduce the grip between the train wheels and the steel track, thus this can lead to longer braking distances for trains or even them coming off the track when the breaks are applied depending on the age, gradient, and angle of the track.

Whither or not it turns out to be the case remains to be determined all the same, but it has been known to happen.
edit on 3-11-2021 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2021 @ 04:19 AM
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a reply to: Skada
No - this is a well-known problem, at least in the UK. I have been on a train when a minor slippage occurred.

What happens is that the first trains over that track compress the wet leaves and make a very slipy coating, which is a bastard to remove.

To try and reduce the problem the railways wanted to severely cut back the nearby trees - and of course this caused an uproar over cutting trees down!

Each autumn the timetables are adjusted to allow the speed to be less because of this.

There have been many attempts to find methods to fix this, not always very successful.

The phrase 'leaves on the line' is so well-known in the UK that a couple of years ago or so, after a major storm, and someone's roof was blown off onto the line, the guard on the train announced the hold-up was due to 'eaves' on the line!



posted on Nov, 4 2021 @ 04:32 AM
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Initial investigations show that slippage was indeed the problem - with the second train unable to stop

www.gov.uk...
edit on 4-11-2021 by AndyMayhew because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2021 @ 05:22 AM
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apparently, many years ago, they planted the wrong kind of trees. Network Rail, who manage the tracks, and associated banks and embankments either side of railways wanted to plant more trees, to help keep the ground stable, but the choice of tree used had leaves which were susceptible to sticking to the rails, and then making the rails extra slippy, causing issues. yes it's a know phenomena. there are plans to replant with different varieties. but as yet the problem still exists, and causes issues every autumn. No conspiracy here. just nature being a bee-atch



posted on Nov, 4 2021 @ 07:40 AM
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Darn shame, that's a tragedy. Wonder how many of em died of COVID?



posted on Nov, 4 2021 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: jjkenobi

That would be none.

Nobody died which has got to be a win for everyone.



posted on Nov, 4 2021 @ 07:52 AM
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originally posted by: Skada
That just seems like an implausible explanation.

I would think that the weight of the train, and the breaking would tear the leaves, leaving wheel to rail contact.
I am no train expert, so maybe leaves can let train slip, I just find it hard to believe.


This has been a thing since there've been trains, look into 'sanding' when it comes to operating trains.



posted on Nov, 5 2021 @ 10:40 AM
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Alright, thanks guys for the clarification.
I'll remember "Leaves on the Line".
That reminds me of Avatar: The last air bender nick cartoon: Iroh singing "Leaves on the vine", little solder boy.




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