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what the hell year is this?

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posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 03:19 PM
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on around 500 ad the monk named Dionysius Exiquus decided to reset time. he began the AD or as we call it now the CE timeline. the year of Christs birth [ an estimation at best ].

my question has always been, what year is this really? the ancient people were quite good at time keeping,they kept track of everything that moved in the skies. so..my question is..what year did they think it was?

what year did Plato think he lived in? what year did the Mayans think it was? what year should it actually be if the good monk hadnt reset everything?

i have no idea myself, i have always studied history in the bc/ad realm, but i have always been curious.



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 03:31 PM
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a reply to: autopat51

We can also mix things up even more with the Phantom timeline hypothesis, or mudfloods, or maybe with the kingdom of Tartary.

Maybe the kingdom of ancient egypt did not really last that long.
Maybe the dark ages never happened.

But as for your question, i think we are living somewhere in the year 789000 region, if you start counting from the first hybridization project.
edit on 1-10-2021 by XipeTotex because: forgot one zeronezeroneoneonezero.



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 03:34 PM
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Would it be using local administration.

Like say, in the third year of scummaos illegal dictatorship, for example.

a reply to: autopat51



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 03:44 PM
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Probably about 5,992 ACH



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 03:57 PM
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lets take Julius Caesar for example. we know when he was born, when he died, when all of his campaigns happend.
but..we know it all in BC...so how did we figure this out? he created the Julian calendar..surely he was aware of the year. where are the documents that tell us his age? how do we know the year in BC?



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:06 PM
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By cross cultural referencing?

Halley’s Comet seen by multiple independent witnesses across the globe and recorded in the local date/time system.

As a type the first thing that comes to mind example.

a reply to: autopat51



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:12 PM
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a reply to: Dalamax

ok, fair enough. what local time, date and year was Caesar born? 101 bc...what does that mean? how did they know how many years to count backwards? there must have been documents from his time stating a year. how would they know how many years to count back?



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:15 PM
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Julius? Which Caesar?

www.academia.edu...



Caesar’s Comet and the Birth of the Roman Empire
George LaturaIn
Natural History
(Book II, 23, 93-94), the Roman writer Pliny explains: ‘The only place in the whole world where a comet is the object of worship is a temple at Rome. His late Majesty Augustus had deemed this comet very propitious to himself, as it had appeared at the beginning of his rule, at some games which, not long after the decease of his father Caesar... he was celebrating...’ ‘In fact he made public the joy that it gave him in these words: ‘On the very days of my Games a comet was visible for seven days in the northern part of the sky. It was rising about an hour before sunset, and was a bright star, visible from all


a reply to: autopat51

edit on 1-10-2021 by Dalamax because: Hope link works



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:16 PM
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You speek or time as if it is absolute and measurable by a specific number. We can only measure the time bifference between two events. We use this information to make up a scale that is convenient to use.

This is now. An event happened so many years in the past. Another event happened so many years before that. And this repeats until you have a easily to use scale. The zero year can be put in any of these years and it doesn’t matter as long as there is an understanding of which zero year you are talking about.

There is no absolute number for the year without understanding some made up zero year and that is an arbitrary decision at best.



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: beyondknowledge

i think you are saying we just made up the years? that vert well could be....



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: Dalamax

doesnt matter actually, pick one.



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:25 PM
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237). Coins struck by Augustus in 18 BCE show the comet of Divus Julius and the bust of his heir (Fig. 1). The long gap between the purported 44 BCE sighting and the comet on coins of Augustus in 18 BCE has led to questions as to whether such an apparition ever took place (Gurval, 1997). Might the comet of 44 BCE have been Augustus’ invention? Ramsey and Licht (1997) write: ‘The answer to this question must be “surely not” for at least three cogent reasons.’ One, traces of ‘anti-Augustan’ interpretations of the event. Two, comets were usually seen as threatening, but Octavian managed to turn this perception around. ‘This stroke of genius on Augustus’ part has to be regarded as one of the most remarkable examples of “spin” control in the whole of antiquity. Third and lastly, we can be certain that there was a comet in 44 BC because one is attested in our Chinese sources...’ The July cometary outburst reached an apparent magnitude of -4, and the
Sidus Iulium
appeared repeatedly in Roman literature: Virgil (37 BCE), Ovid (8 CE), Pliny (77 CE), Suetonius (121 CE). Modern discussions of ancient texts and coins in


From same source

reply to: Dalamax



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: autopat51

lol no. The Romans counted by consul, the Egyptians by big event of the year during the reign of xy, the Mayans I believe counted in 3 different cycles Tzolkin, Haab' and Long Count, ancient semites used big events like f.e. the exodus to start a new count....



how would they know how many years to count back?

What?



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:30 PM
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originally posted by: autopat51
a reply to: beyondknowledge

i think you are saying we just made up the years? that vert well could be....



No. I am saying we made up the number for the year by stating where the zero year is. The actual number is irreveliant to anything that is not man made and within the same cultural understanding of that number.

edit on 10 1 2021 by beyondknowledge because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:32 PM
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it's all relative.



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:55 PM
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www.timeanddate.com...

Gregorian Calendar Reform: Why Are Some Dates Missing?
By Konstantin Bikos and Aparna Kher

The Gregorian calendar, the calendar system we use today, was first introduced in 1582. To make up for the inaccuracies of its predecessor, the Julian calendar, a number of days had to be skipped.


Too Many Leap Years
The Gregorian calendar, also known as the Western or Christian calendar, is the most widely used calendar in the world today.

Its predecessor, the Julian calendar, was replaced because it did not correctly reflect the actual time it takes the Earth to circle once around the Sun, known as a tropical year. In the Julian calendar, a leap day was added every four years, which is too frequent.

Although it is not perfect either, today's Gregorian calendar uses a much more accurate rule for calculating leap years.

Skipped Several Days
Over the centuries since its introduction in 45 BCE, the Julian calendar had gradually drifted away from astronomical events like the vernal equinox and the winter solstice. To make up for this error and get the calendar back in sync with the astronomical seasons, a number of days had to be dropped when the Gregorian calendar was adopted.

In North America, for example, the month of September 1752 had only 19 days, as the day count went straight from September 2 to September 14 (see illustration).

Number of Lost Days Varied
The papal bull issued by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582 decreed that 10 days be skipped when switching to the Gregorian calendar. However, only five countries adopted the new calendar system that year—namely, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and most of France.

Since the discrepancy between the Julian calendar year and the astronomical seasons kept growing over time in the centuries that followed, more days had to be skipped in countries that switched to the Gregorian calendar in later years. Some countries, such as Russia, Greece, and Turkey, switched calendars as late as the early 20th century, so they had to omit 13 days (see table).

Switch Took More Than 300 Years
In total, more than three centuries passed until the Gregorian calendar had been adopted in all countries, from 1582 to 1927. The table below shows when the calendar reform occurred in some countries, including the first and the last.



13 Days Behind Today
Currently, the Julian calendar is 13 days behind the Gregorian calendar. This gap will change in the year 2100 when the discrepancy will increase to 14 days.



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: Peeple

how would they know how many years to count back from the BC/AD time change?



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 05:09 PM
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It would seem that time is somehow related to astrology. What we see up in the skies might not be exactly what we’re told, might be the same of earth itself.

This should be an interesting topic. I’ve always been interested in the timeline, the what how when and why.

a reply to: autopat51



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 05:13 PM
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a reply to: autopat51
There were many different cultures in the ancient world, and they used different time eras, often based on the founder of a dynasty. I'll check my copies of the Cambridge Ancient History and see if I can find a list.

Give me a few minutes. I'm going to type out something from Vol1.


edit on 1-10-2021 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2021 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: autopat51

Who is 'they'? Historians? Because the order of events, like a puzzle a bit.

...it's throwing me off because it feels like you're asking how did Socrates know he lived in the year 400bc.
Just to be clear you're not, right?




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