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Has an Mrna vax ever been used on humans before now

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posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:33 AM
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I keep seeing this and really dont knw how true it is.

So has an MRNA vax ever been used on humans b4 now?

Has Moderna ever had a vax approved for use in humans before this EUA?

Has Moderna or anyone ever had an MRNA vaccine even approved for human trials before this EUA?

And if they have why didnt one ever come to market before now?


When they have tested these Mrna vaccines on other animals how did those animals really fare?

I am trying to figure why anyone would get an MRNA vaccine.



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:35 AM
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A bit of the history here in an article from 2018 might answer a few of your questions.

www.nature.com...


a reply to: sciencelol



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: sciencelol

Google (or whatever your favourite search engine is) is your friend

linkypoo


While an mRNA vaccine has never been on the market anywhere in the world, mRNA vaccines have been tested in humans before, for at least four infectious diseases: rabies, influenza, cytomegalovirus, and Zika.



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: sciencelol

No.
No.
No.
Because technology wasn't there.
IDK, may depend on the vaccine.




I am trying to figure why anyone would get an MRNA vaccine.

Complete trust in flawless science, fear, peer pressure, by mandate



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:38 AM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79
a reply to: sciencelol

Google (or whatever your favourite search engine is) is your friend

linkypoo


While an mRNA vaccine has never been on the market anywhere in the world, mRNA vaccines have been tested in humans before, for at least four infectious diseases: rabies, influenza, cytomegalovirus, and Zika.


Ok well why were they not approved and it seems we still have all those viruses ?
edit on 31-8-2021 by sciencelol because: (no reason given)


I mean obviously they didnt work or they would have been approved so Why would you think these ones all of a sudden work?
edit on 31-8-2021 by sciencelol because: (no reason given)

edit on 31-8-2021 by sciencelol because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:39 AM
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originally posted by: sciencelol

originally posted by: TerryDon79
a reply to: sciencelol

Google (or whatever your favourite search engine is) is your friend

linkypoo


While an mRNA vaccine has never been on the market anywhere in the world, mRNA vaccines have been tested in humans before, for at least four infectious diseases: rabies, influenza, cytomegalovirus, and Zika.


Ok well why were they not approved and it seems we still have all viruses ?


Because they were still in trials (it's in the link).



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:41 AM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: sciencelol

originally posted by: TerryDon79
a reply to: sciencelol

Google (or whatever your favourite search engine is) is your friend

linkypoo


While an mRNA vaccine has never been on the market anywhere in the world, mRNA vaccines have been tested in humans before, for at least four infectious diseases: rabies, influenza, cytomegalovirus, and Zika.


Ok well why were they not approved and it seems we still have all viruses ?


Because they were still in trials (it's in the link).


They are still trials ? how long have they been iin trials ?



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:43 AM
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originally posted by: sciencelol

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: sciencelol

originally posted by: TerryDon79
a reply to: sciencelol

Google (or whatever your favourite search engine is) is your friend

linkypoo


While an mRNA vaccine has never been on the market anywhere in the world, mRNA vaccines have been tested in humans before, for at least four infectious diseases: rabies, influenza, cytomegalovirus, and Zika.


Ok well why were they not approved and it seems we still have all viruses ?


Because they were still in trials (it's in the link).


They are still trials ? how long have they been iin trials ?


Try using a search engine.



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
A bit of the history here in an article from 2018 might answer a few of your questions.

www.nature.com...


a reply to: sciencelol





From the link you posted:

“Diverse approaches to mRNA cancer vaccines, including dendritic cell vaccines and various types of directly injectable mRNA, have been employed in numerous cancer clinical trials, with some promising results showing antigen-specific T cell responses and prolonged disease-free survival in some cases.”

This is what my dr described when I inquired about mRNA technology and what its all about. She was excited and said it may be as medical profound a discovery as antibiotics and vaccines were.



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Not in mass scale so no.
From the link you linked it doesn't say how many people had being tested with mRNAs. I assume very few.


Diverse approaches to mRNA cancer vaccines, including dendritic cell vaccines and various types of directly injectable mRNA, have been employed in numerous cancer clinical trials, with some promising results showing antigen-specific T cell responses and prolonged disease-free survival in some cases.

Key note
"Some promising results"
edit on 31-8-2021 by HawkEyi because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: sciencelol

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: sciencelol

originally posted by: TerryDon79
a reply to: sciencelol

Google (or whatever your favourite search engine is) is your friend

linkypoo


While an mRNA vaccine has never been on the market anywhere in the world, mRNA vaccines have been tested in humans before, for at least four infectious diseases: rabies, influenza, cytomegalovirus, and Zika.


Ok well why were they not approved and it seems we still have all viruses ?


Because they were still in trials (it's in the link).


They are still trials ? how long have they been iin trials ?


Try using a search engine.


No



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:49 AM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
A bit of the history here in an article from 2018 might answer a few of your questions.

www.nature.com...


a reply to: sciencelol



You cant expect these people to click a link and read. You need to help them.

From the link. First use in Animals.

The first report of the successful use of in vitro transcribed (IVT) mRNA in animals was published in 1990, when reporter gene mRNAs were injected into mice and protein production was detected5. A subsequent study in 1992 demonstrated that administration of vasopressin-encoding mRNA in the hypothalamus could elicit a physiological response in rats6. However, these early promising results did not lead to substantial investment in developing mRNA therapeutics, largely owing to concerns associated with mRNA instability, high innate immunogenicity and inefficient in vivo delivery. Instead, the field pursued DNA-based and protein-based therapeutic approaches7,8.



edit on 31-8-2021 by MDDoxs because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: BrujaRebooted

Ah but noticed what they wrote? disease-free survival in some cases and yet these mRNA vaxs are getting booster shots this mRNA was supposed to work like the TB which u get immunity for a long time.



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: MDDoxs

Well this part was worrying.



largely owing to concerns associated with mRNA instability, high innate



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:51 AM
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How mRNA Technology Could Change the World
mRNA’s story likely will not end with COVID-19: Its potential stretches far beyond this pandemic.



Synthetic mRNA, the ingenious technology behind the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, might seem like a sudden breakthrough, or a new discovery.

One year ago, almost nobody in the world knew what an mRNA vaccine was, for the good reason that no country in the world had ever approved one.

Months later, the same technology powered the two fastest vaccine trials in the history of science......



edit on 8312021 by MetalThunder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:51 AM
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"What a promising result actually can mean"




originally posted by: HawkEyi
a reply to: nonspecific

Not in mass scale so no.
From the link you linked it doesn't say how many people had being tested with mRNAs. I assume very few.


Diverse approaches to mRNA cancer vaccines, including dendritic cell vaccines and various types of directly injectable mRNA, have been employed in numerous cancer clinical trials, with some promising results showing antigen-specific T cell responses and prolonged disease-free survival in some cases.

Key note
"Some promising results"

edit on 31.8.2021 by ThatDamnDuckAgain because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 10:55 AM
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And herelies the issue.

Someone asked a question.

I gave them a link from a fairly decent source that predates the covid 19 pandemic and hoped it answered some of the questions they had. I offered no opinion just the link so they could maybe learn something.

You posted a meme that was intended to demean the current mRNA vaccines because of a personal opinion.

It's one of the reasons we can't have nice things.



a reply to: ThatDamnDuckAgain



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific
A meme is powerful right?

Doesn't it represent what was promised to everyone? 98% efficiency, will wipe this bug out.

Now look at the numbers.

My meme is precise, it nails down what "a promising result" actually can mean.
edit on 31.8.2021 by ThatDamnDuckAgain because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 11:03 AM
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How does your meme help the op understand more about the questions they raised?

Has your meme been of benefit to the causal reader or other contributors of this thread.





a reply to: ThatDamnDuckAgain



posted on Aug, 31 2021 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific




How does your meme help the op understand more about the questions they raised?

Well I think HawkEyi is smart enough to figure out what "promising results" can mean, but found a little illustration to be helpful visualizing it for the other readers not in flow of conversation.

We don't want to make false impressions right? That the term "promising results" can be stretched very wide.




Has your meme been of benefit to the causal reader or other contributors of this thread.

Well I think I explained my intentions although I don't need to report to you. You can now doubt them, be nonspecific or whatever.


edit on 31.8.2021 by ThatDamnDuckAgain because: (no reason given)




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