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Could the lockup’s be a way for nefarious i.p theft.

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posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:45 AM
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Could the lockup’s which have forced people to be working from home due to the questionable viru have been a false flag created by the chicoms, which as proven over the years that intellectual property has been stolen.

The chicom plant may be authorised to access sensitive company data.


As proven over many years Chinese government plants have been discovered in numerous organisations stealing I.p data.

With these lockup’s and many people working from home, who would have less scrutiny due to not being monitored as heavily as they would be if in the office.

Could these Chinese plants be taking advantage of this as it would be easier instead of emailing files to the chicoms, the handlers are in the same residence and can photograph sensitive data and there would be no evidence of file transfers. The handler would send the images to their masters. Of the plant would do this themselves.

In the office people would question why you are taking pics with your personal mobile.

No questions at home. As your workmates are not there

edit on 26-8-2021 by robsmith because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-8-2021 by robsmith because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:48 AM
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originally posted by: robsmith
With these lockup’s and many people working from home, who would have less scrutiny due to not being monitored as heavily as they would be if in the office.


If you're using a work computer and accessing company platforms you can be monitored just as much as if you were in the office.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:48 AM
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originally posted by: robsmith
Could the lockup’s which have forced people to be working from home due to the questionable viru have been a false flag created by the chicoms, which as proven over the years that intellectual property has been stolen.

As proven over many years Chinese government plants have been discovered in numerous organisations stealing I.p data.

With these lockup’s and many people working from home, who would have less scrutiny due to not being monitored as heavily as they would be if in the office.

Could these Chinese plants be taking advantage of this as it would be easier instead of emailing files to the chicoms, the handlers are in the same residence and can photograph sensitive data and there would be no evidence of file transfers. The handler would send the images to their masters. Of the plant would do this themselves.


No, because those spies would have the sane access wherever they were based.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:49 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: robsmith
With these lockup’s and many people working from home, who would have less scrutiny due to not being monitored as heavily as they would be if in the office.


If you're using a work computer and accessing company platforms you can be monitored just as much as if you were in the office.


And you wouldn't have as much access to physical data or prototypes



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:50 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
I realise they are monitored, though who knows if they are using their phone to take pics of their computer monitor to send this to a handler. The employer would be nine the wiser.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:52 AM
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originally posted by: robsmith
I realise they are monitored, though who knows if they are using their phone to take pics of their computer monitor to send this to a handler. The employer would be nine the wiser.


You could do this even if you weren't working remotely.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: AaarghZombies
In the office people would question why you are taking pics with your personal mobile.

No questions at home. As your workmates are not there.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:56 AM
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originally posted by: robsmith
In the office people would question why you are taking pics with your personal mobile.


If you were stupid enough to do it in front of people, there's plenty of options to do this surreptitiously no matter where you are.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:57 AM
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a reply to: robsmith

Definitely a possibility. While most large corporations that would deal with IP have security measures in place at their offices to ensure nobody is taking pics of their monitors or screens, there is no possible way to do this at a personal residence unless that employee allowed their work to place a camera and monitor their every move at their residence.

It makes it MUCH easier for this to occur.

Those that say it does not, are not looking at this from a security standpoint. There are reasons secret and top secret clearance facilities do not allow personal cell phones or cameras inside.

From home, you could use a voice recorder for calls and a camera for pics and they would be none the wiser until it was too late.

I don't think this was the reason for the lockdowns, but it would certainly make the act easier to accomplish.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 06:59 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicusi work in a basic phone farm And all this is monitored.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:01 AM
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a reply to: robsmith

I don't think a 'basic phone farm' is incubating any IP technology worth stealing.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:04 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

We maintain government data, can’t divulge too much though it is sensitive info.

There is screen capture on which data we access. And all customer interactions are recorded.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:06 AM
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originally posted by: robsmith
We maintain government data, can’t divulge too much though it is sensitive info.

There is screen capture on which data we access. And all customer interactions are recorded.


'Government data' is not developable IP, it's just data with no context.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:10 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

agreed, in my work it’s sensitive personal info. Though what’s to stop a worker at home who may have access to Lockheed’s tr3b.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:14 AM
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originally posted by: robsmith
Though what’s to stop a worker at home who may have access to Lockheed’s tr3b.


You really think LM is going to permit people to take Skunk Works info home in any capacity?



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:18 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
No it was a joke, what if an agent stole the tech in what makes a Kirby vacuum still out perform any Dyson ever made. Where Kirby tech is over 70 years old.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:23 AM
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Information at this level is heavily compartmentalized. It's not like a company in possession of high value IP has hundreds or thousands of people with access to that IP. That access is limited and strictly controlled to a point where if something were stolen or leaked it's not at all difficult to trace it back to a single source.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:24 AM
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originally posted by: robsmith
...what if an agent stole the tech in what makes a Kirby vacuum still out perform any Dyson ever made. Where Kirby tech is over 70 years old.


Corporate espionage has been a thing since forever, there are more ways to mitigate now than before and with the recent EO it will only become more stringent with cyber security assurance.



posted on Aug, 26 2021 @ 07:24 AM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

The privacy implications could not be justified, the employer would need that camera active 24 seven days a week. Wouldn’t think that is legal.

Who knows who is listening or watching.



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