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How are vaccines usually introduced compared to the current “Jab”?

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posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 01:20 AM
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While middle-aged, I think I’m too young to remember any other vaccine or “vaccine” hitting the market.

For those who have lived through it or are familiar, what publicity does a vaccine or similar new product usually receive? Are we missing facts and being blinded by opinion?

I’m not sure I’d use the word “fortunate”, but of late I’ve resided in Vermont and tend to only travel to visit like-minded family and friends. My community and social network is all a bunch of small town, down-home, caring, conservative or libertarian types.

I don’t think we are the target audience for any propaganda because we don’t care and we won’t listen anyhow. I’ll paint a picture. Most people own large tracts of land but have good relations and support with neighbors. It’s a novel and exciting event when we find a stretch of road that has reliable cell phone service because most of the area has no service. We don’t have any large stores nearby and the local towns chase them away whenever they propose to invade our area.

Nobody I know will consider receiving “the jab”. Only one person in my community whom I know expressed any interest in receiving it is the little old lady who makes sandwiches at the local deli. Whatever propaganda is being used isn’t enough to affect us. Then again I don’t have any exposure to the mainstream media (not only do I not care, but I lack the time, so it’s not that I think I’m a rebel) so I’m going by guesses of what you fine folks on ATS have to share.

It sounds to me like there is...advertising...if that’s the proper word. I can’t imagine how silly some of it must be. I get the impression that it’s taken lightly by educated people but bought hook, line, and sinker by the uneducated and ignorant.

How does all of this compare to the past? Perhaps the polio vaccine campaign was similar? Were community opinions firmly against past vaccines until more testing was done? Is there a repository of historical information on such things?

I’m quite tired and in need of rest but value my ATS time so highly that I had to get this out and off of my mind.
edit on 23-6-2021 by therainmaker because: Thought of more



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: therainmaker

It does not compare as it is not a vaccine. If it was a vaccine however, it could take as much as 25 years before it hits the market. That is what happened with the chicken pox vaccine in fact. And i recall that only a very small amount of people had an adverse reaction before they pulled it until they could sort out the issues if Im not mistaken but I am too lazy to dig up that info right now.



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 02:42 AM
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a reply to: therainmaker


I like my experimental and super-rushed vaccines to come with potential lottery winnings.

Really makes the whole thing make sense.

Gives it that science-y appeal.



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 03:08 AM
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a reply to: therainmaker

The H1N1 vaccine got a big push in 2009, but it mostly lacked the constant media push and political pressure. The media was supportive and provided information in a somewhat objective fashion. We seem to get editorialized, often incomplete, takes on the COVID vax.

The most recent vax I remember seeing paid ads for is HPV. It was strictly paid advertising. So I'd say most vax are not much of a blip on the radar for media. They are typically not editorialized on or pushed with such zealotry.



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 06:33 AM
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a reply to: Ksihkehe

Good thread!

They made a bigger deal out the virus than they did the vaccine. No joke
I've never seen anything like that parade. It was like the astronauts splashing
down in the ocean again returning from a moon landing. The media was
dancing, red carpet and ticker tape everywhere, blow'n their party horns.
Casting their PR mottos that you could tell they'd been sitting on for years
with anticipation.

"We're all in this together" THAT ISN"T SIX FEET! No you on that dot and
don't you move till I tell ya! Mam this is your dot mam yes thank you
mam. Thank you for shopping at Wal mart. Where we're committed to
keeping you safe in these troubled times. The inter com blasting out
Paging Dr. Clinton Kildepstien your party is waiting for you at the changing
rooms.

People driving around by themselves with their car windows up mask and
air conditioning on. I seriously doubt it was as deadly as they were hoping
it would be. And as soon as it started to fizzle out? The democrats start
jamming all the covid patients they could find into nursing homes. Up until
that point, I couldn't believe people were actually scared. When they
started that nursing home crap? It was like I had just drank the Kool
aid with out knowing it was Kool aid. Instant paranoia, we're all gonna
die?

Why because of covid? NOOO because they want us to. Sniveling all
over myself.

Only in America can you watch a fiasco turn into a full blown debacle.
Bring your own TP.
edit on 23-6-2021 by Randyvine2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: Ksihkehe

Yep, something is fishy that they are pushing it this hard.

It actually is having hte opposite effect and making a lot of people cautious, like 'if it's so good why are they push ng it so desparately?'

All the supermarkets I go into now have little signs saying 'Get your free COVID19 vaccine, walkins accepted no appt necessary!' lol no thank you.


edit to say just this morning I got a random auto text from my pharmacy saying 'Safeway Pharmacy RX: Covid-19 vaccines are here. Adults & Kids age 12+ are eligible via walk-in or schedule appt'

I didnt ask for that notification
edit on 23/6/2021 by chris_stibrany because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 03:57 PM
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I’m actually Surprised by the Recent Television
Commercials push for the Jab!!
It seems they are trying to get the Word out,
Anyway they can, And At All Costs,
to Push their (Agenda) NonVaccine!
It’s Even FREE!!
So Run, Run the Opposite Way!

edit on 05/07/18 by FreeFalling because: Sp



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 04:09 PM
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originally posted by: drewlander

It does not compare as it is not a vaccine. If it was a vaccine however, it could take as much as 25 years before it hits the market. That is what happened with the chicken pox vaccine in fact. And i recall that only a very small amount of people had an adverse reaction before they pulled it until they could sort out the issues if Im not mistaken but I am too lazy to dig up that info right now.


Kind of BS, you are trying to compare something made back in 1800s or earlier to something made today...lol Back then they gave Cow Pox to kids and then infected them with small pox and saw that they didn't get it even after infecting them 20 times.

Here is what everyone thought with Cow Pox based vaccine...




edit on 23-6-2021 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: therainmaker
While middle-aged, I think I’m too young to remember any other vaccine or “vaccine” hitting the market.

For those who have lived through it or are familiar, what publicity does a vaccine or similar new product usually receive? Are we missing facts and being blinded by opinion?



Shingles vaccine came about around 2017, I got mine last year. Some others below...

2003 – First nasal influenza vaccine approved in U.S. (FluMist)
2003 – First vaccine for Argentine hemorrhagic fever.[15]
2006 – First vaccine for human papillomavirus (which is a cause of cervical cancer)
2012 – First vaccine for hepatitis E[16]
2012 – First quadrivalent (4-strain) influenza vaccine
2015 – First vaccine for enterovirus 71, one cause of hand foot mouth disease[17]
2015 – First vaccine for malaria[18]
2015 – First vaccine for dengue fever[19]
2019 – First vaccine for Ebola approved[20]
2020 – First vaccine for COVID-19.


Clinical trails are all the same with COVID or any other.



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 08:10 PM
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a reply to: Xtrozero

I’ll play.

How about FDA emergency approval and not being able to find a job because you took every single one but the last?

Can’t wait for those “non-existen” long-term…..

Wait. Nvm.



posted on Jun, 23 2021 @ 09:12 PM
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The experimental Covid-19 vaccine drugs are in a "testing" phase, which is why the CDC is circumventing the normal "caution" protocols.

The latest example:

The CDC has issued Covid-19 vaccine guidance for those who have a history of heart conditions.

If you, or anyone you know, still thinks the U.S. Government is on our side, here is additional evidence proving they are NOT.

More CDC Craziness: twitter.com...




posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 01:24 AM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero


Shingles vaccine came about around 2017, I got mine last year. Some others below...

2003 – First nasal influenza vaccine approved in U.S. (FluMist)
2003 – First vaccine for Argentine hemorrhagic fever.[15]
2006 – First vaccine for human papillomavirus (which is a cause of cervical cancer)
2012 – First vaccine for hepatitis E[16]
2012 – First quadrivalent (4-strain) influenza vaccine
2015 – First vaccine for enterovirus 71, one cause of hand foot mouth disease[17]
2015 – First vaccine for malaria[18]
2015 – First vaccine for dengue fever[19]
2019 – First vaccine for Ebola approved[20]
2020 – First vaccine for COVID-19.

Clinical trails are all the same with COVID or any other.


Awesome post!

Save for the C19 jab, take a look at the list. A solid majority of the vaccines are for illnesses that cause significant morbidity and/or mortality. (sing to self) Which one of these things doesn't belong here.

Also of note, though not listed, some come with nicely bound criteria for giving the vaccine. For example, shingles and pneumonia are only given later in life. Why? Well that's when getting the illnesses tend to appear, be debilitating, or deadly. Your fave jab and mine, if subject to our previous somewhat rational timeline, would likely only be fully approved to give at over 50 (if wanting to start at the beginning of COVID's danger zone), though following more closely the pneumonia vaccine's approval (age 60 to 65ish I think is recommended start) would more reasonable. And of course, like any proper vaccine, there'd be actual research to show that vaccination outside the age range could be beneficial to other patient populations. We have long left the rational vaccine approval timeline.

As we review this awesome list, I think to myself which of these would I take if an EUA if a pandemic arose.

Hemorrhagic fevers - Yes please. Ugly and very likely death if caught.

Malaria - For sure. I am pretty sure malaria still outranks C19 as most deadly bug per population at risk, though I think C19 did beat it for overall world wide deaths in 2020. I don't believe by much. Malaria has a long history of massive mortality. This vaccine's creation team iterally deserves a Nobel prize for its potential to put a huge dent in annual deaths due to malaria.

The others, I don't believe I'd take EUA.

Great post. Gonna see what I can dig up on some time lines from testing to FDA approval on the shingles vax. I think it's pretty new.



posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 01:45 AM
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originally posted by: drewlander
a reply to: therainmaker

It does not compare as it is not a vaccine. If it was a vaccine however, it could take as much as 25 years before it hits the market. That is what happened with the chicken pox vaccine in fact. And i recall that only a very small amount of people had an adverse reaction before they pulled it until they could sort out the issues if Im not mistaken but I am too lazy to dig up that info right now.


That's not true it's 3 to 6 years for clinical development. Covid they did it in 2 but that is because they didn't have to isolate the virus and create a new one. The hardest part of making a vaccine has been creating a virus that is harmless to match the strain you're creating the vaccine for. So usually you create a dummy virus that cant replicate but is close enough to the real thing our bodies can't tell. With mRNA, you can skip this step completely.



posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 02:28 AM
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originally posted by: davegazi2

Gonna see what I can dig up on some time lines from testing to FDA approval on the shingles vax. I think it's pretty new.


Alright. Let's look at Shingrix for shingles.

2008 - Wanted to go to Phase 3 trials. Denied. Phase 1 and 2 trial data did not support.

The timeline between 2008 and 2016 is extensive. Starts on page 16 of the linked PDF. www.google.com...://www.fda.gov/media/108793/download&ved=2ahUKEwimjfHk1q_xAhUTG80KHV1EBEoQFjALegQICBAC&usg=A OvVaw2UzLLZf-q_CkPvT7OTP7ta&cshid=1624517701190

2016 Oct 21 - Submitted for review

2017 October 20 - FDA approval

Minimally took 9 years Phase I and II trial, and get the vax approved. And that does NOT include vaccine development.

BTW...Just got hit with a post-market warning concerning Guillain Barre Syndrome 2021 March 24. Interesting took 3.5 years of giving the vax to build evidence to issue the warning. Warning issued due to 3 - 6 excess cases per MILLION doses given ("excess cases" meaning more than expected GBS rate for population without the vaccine)

www.fda.gov... ing-information-shingrix#:~:text=Shingrix%20received%20FDA%20approval%20on,months%20after%20the%20first%20dose.


edit on 24-6-2021 by davegazi2 because: Fighting with links



posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 03:19 AM
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originally posted by: drewlander
a reply to: therainmaker

It does not compare as it is not a vaccine. If it was a vaccine however, it could take as much as 25 years before it hits the market. That is what happened with the chicken pox vaccine in fact. And i recall that only a very small amount of people had an adverse reaction before they pulled it until they could sort out the issues if Im not mistaken but I am too lazy to dig up that info right now.


Your a little out of data, I'm afraid, there are multiple covid shots on tbmarket that use the traditional viral vector method with a killed version of covid and no MRNA technology.

They got to the market faster because the science is well known. It's essentially an upgraded flu shot. It was given rapid approval which meant that they could mass produce it while the 3rd phase trials were still under way rather than waiting till they had finished. The exact same safety protocol were used.

They reckon that they've perfected the process now so the next version will take less than 3 months to complete.

We're just really good at making these things niw so huts faster and cheaper.



posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 03:25 AM
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a reply to: AaarghZombies
There is nothing 'traditional' about viral vector vaccines.
It says they differ from most conventional vaccines:

Viral vector-based vaccines differ from most conventional vaccines in that they don’t actually contain antigens, but rather use the body’s own cells to produce them. They do this by using a modified virus (the vector) to deliver genetic code for antigen, in the case of COVID-19 spike proteins found on the surface of the virus, into human cells. By infecting cells and instructing them to make large amounts of antigen, which then trigger an immune response, the vaccine mimics what happens during natural infection with certain pathogens - especially viruses.
www.gavi.org...


edit on 24-6-2021 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 03:32 AM
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a reply to: AaarghZombies
Please supply the names of the vaccines you recommend.



posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: davegazi2

Cant look at shingles there is still a lot we don't know about this. Like why the virus can lay dormant then suddenly activate. Why does it only remain in some people but not others? And the vaccine isn't all that effective considering once you have it your body will take care of it usually. So much like herpes, you deal with outbreaks but why is still the big question. So many drugs have been developed but often turn out to be ineffective.



posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 10:28 AM
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originally posted by: slatesteam
a reply to: Xtrozero

I’ll play.

How about FDA emergency approval and not being able to find a job because you took every single one but the last?

Can’t wait for those “non-existen” long-term…..

Wait. Nvm.



You kind of loss me there with the job remark....

The reality is whether FDA approved or emer approved it is the exact same amount of testing either way. Emer approved is just bypassing the bureaucracy side of it all.


edit on 24-6-2021 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2021 @ 10:52 AM
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originally posted by: davegazi2

Great post. Gonna see what I can dig up on some time lines from testing to FDA approval on the shingles vax. I think it's pretty new.


I actually agree with you 100%. I'm 61 and shingles do not look good for my age group. I also had Chicken pox as a kid in the 60s and I think that is what causes shingles in older people, so if you are younger never having chicken pox you most likely do not need it.

I have said many time I think we went over board with COVID in every direction. They started with 3 to 5% death rate and never really got off that idea with our responses. As to COVID most like if we did it right we would be closer to a typical flu season or maybe 2x a normal flu season. People are not dying today that would most likely have died a year ago as example just with the technics they use now.

I have said over and over that I feel if you are 40+ and/or preexisting conditions you should get it, and everyone else not get it and let COVID run its course like having schools open this whole last year. Both my sons got the vaccine ages 18 and 21 mainly because their college made it mandatory to attend. My 21 year-old already got COVID last year as they went for heard immunity on their own with big parties. I think Pullman at one point was the highest risk in the world as about 10,000 of them got it within 2 weeks. No one died, and no one spent weeks in a hospital either. They all had a fever for about a day felt like they had a flu for two day then felt fine except no sense of smell for 3 days, then nothing.

The interesting thing about mRNA is it has been in testing for two decades and was originally being developed for Ebola and Rabies... They found the basic nature of it makes it very easy to dial in anything they want, so it just might end up being the cure for cancer too, so I would not treat it as some evil thing, BUT we do not know all conditions and we are using billions of people as the post market observation called phase 4, and that is a lot of people at risk to figure out all reactions to it when for most it isn't worth the whole risk vs reward as you eluded to in your comments in which you would take ort not.

edit on 24-6-2021 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)




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