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Quick question on airspeed

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posted on May, 31 2021 @ 09:58 PM
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I have watched the videos of the uaps and am wondering about where the pilot says they are going 120 knots against the wind, which is 220 kph, and they are filming it, why are planes up in the air when its so windy?



posted on May, 31 2021 @ 10:03 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlaska

Because planes cost money when they're parked. Going west to east, you actually get better fuel burn in high winds. Planes have been tracked over the Atlantic at over 700 mph ground speed because of high winds. They shaved a fair amount of time on their trip too. Going east to west, they tend to travel in an arc so they don't go directly into the wind.
edit on 5/31/2021 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2021 @ 10:05 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlaska



why are planes up in the air when its so windy?


What was the wind speed?



posted on May, 31 2021 @ 10:19 PM
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On the navy video the guy says 120 knots against the wind, and so to film it they too (the navy plane) must also have been going 120 knots against the wind. Thats 220 kph..



posted on May, 31 2021 @ 10:27 PM
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originally posted by: WhiteAlaska
I have watched the videos of the uaps and am wondering about where the pilot says they are going 120 knots against the wind, which is 220 kph, and they are filming it, why are planes up in the air when its so windy?


The take off speed of an F-18 is about 165 knots. The max speed is about 1000 knots. 120 knots is not a particularly high speed for a jet fighter.



posted on May, 31 2021 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlaska

Jet aircraft, especially fighters, fly significantly faster than 120 knots, into or with the wind. At 66,000 pounds, an F-18 has a stall speed (meaning that the wing is no longer producing lift) of roughly 135 knots. They land at between 150 and 160 knots.



posted on May, 31 2021 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: 1947boomer

An F-18 probably won't get down to 120 knots, and still fly. Going by the stall speed graph in the NATOPS manual, at max power, stall speed is somewhere around 125 KCAS. At different power settings, it goes as high as about 155 KCAS.



posted on May, 31 2021 @ 11:50 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: 1947boomer

An F-18 probably won't get down to 120 knots, and still fly. Going by the stall speed graph in the NATOPS manual, at max power, stall speed is somewhere around 125 KCAS. At different power settings, it goes as high as about 155 KCAS.


Agreed.



posted on May, 31 2021 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlaska



guy says 120 knots against the wind


I get that. The object is doing 120 knots, into the wind, so what's the wind speed that's making it so windy?



posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 12:03 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: WhiteAlaska
They shaved a fair amount of time on their trip too. Going east to west, they tend to travel in an arc so they don't go directly into the wind.


Same principle for me on my bike on long rides!



posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 12:42 AM
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a reply to: WhiteAlaska

I think he says they are going against the wind which is 120kts from the west. This is the upper windspeed and direction it is coming from. Not a big deal for aircraft that operate at the higher altitudes or flight levels. Most pilots when checking in with ATC will let the controller know how the ride is (bumpy or smooth). You can also request a climb or descent to find more favourable winds.

Aircraft do have windspeed limitations such as crosswind but this is generally for takeoff and landing.

A balloon or drone on the other hand would have a little bit of a tougher time vs an F18 with that much of a head wind if you catch my drift.


edit on 1-6-2021 by Slyder12 because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-6-2021 by Slyder12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 02:09 AM
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originally posted by: Slyder12
A balloon or drone on the other hand would have a little bit of a tougher time vs an F18 with that much of a head wind if you catch my drift.
One thing to keep in mind is that not only wind speed can vary based on altitude, but sometimes even direction, which could lead to illusions of balloons flying against the wind, when in fact they are not. This is a common wind pattern near Albuquerque that balloonists use to change directions by changing altitude.



So if you're on the ground and you feel wind blowing toward Albuquerque, if you weren't aware of this, you might think those things flying in the opposite direction at a higher altitude couldn't be balloons because they might seem to be flying against the wind.

I try to keep this in mind when someone tells me "it couldn't be a balloon because it was flying against the wind". How detailed is the wind profile available to the claimant? Do they really know the various wind speeds and directions at various altitudes? If so, how do they know this?


edit on 202161 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 03:02 AM
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You know , this thread made me realize something I had never thought about.
The UAPs were going at an unearthly speed of 129 knots against the wind.

Wait.
What ?????
edit on 6/1/21 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 03:17 AM
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posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 09:28 AM
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originally posted by: ArchangelOger
a reply to: Gothmog

www.youtube.com...

I am serious.
And don't call me Surely.



posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: WhiteAlaska

I don't think they scrambled Jets on the objects guys.

The radar video was from the data center on the ship, the radar arrays on the ship and other supporting ships were used to capture the speed and footage.

The objects weren't planes. They were UAP's strongly suspected to be extraterrestrial.

Also the objects.. would hover at around 40knots.. instantaneously accelerate to 138knots and come to a dead stop.. and did this in those extreme winds.



posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Good point. This can and does happen.

As to how detailed the wind profile is to the flight crew. They would have and idea of what the upper winds were through an upper wind model which would have been discussed in the preflight weather check.

Additionally most modern aircraft have a wind display usually indicated on the HSI which gives you a vector and speed of the wind relative to the aircraft in pretty much real time (might be a few seconds delay). If you are changing directions and attitudes fairly abruptly it becomes less accurate. Pretty much straight and level or constant track and it is quite accurate. I can't speak to the F18 but I would be extremely surprised if it didn't have this.

If they are saying the wind is 120kts from the West, the wind is pretty much 120kts from the West give or take a few knots and degrees.


edit on 1-6-2021 by Slyder12 because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-6-2021 by Slyder12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2021 @ 11:33 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58

Jet aircraft, especially fighters, fly significantly faster than 120 knots, into or with the wind. At 66,000 pounds, an F-18 has a stall speed (meaning that the wing is no longer producing lift) of roughly 135 knots. They land at between 150 and 160 knots.


Thinking the same thing, pretty damn slow... You could have a ground speed of 120 kts, might want to change alt to get out of the jet stream...lol




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