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Farmer sues after being ordered not to work his farm

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posted on May, 29 2021 @ 07:18 PM
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Remember Obama's re-writing of the Clean Water Act? Here is one of many examples showing how Obama/Biden/Democrats re-wrote the Clean Water Act to take over farmers' lands with the excuse that seasonal puddles, and seasonal runoffs are "protected wetlands..."

The South Dakota farmer was ordered in 2011 not to farm in his own farm because of this seasonal puddle that forms in his land which has been in his family since the early 1900.

This is a picture of the puddle that democrats claim must be protected, hence the farmer cannot farm in his own land...



So the farmer is now suing back


Farmer sues after being ordered not to work his farm
Ag Department rules a mud puddle is protected wetlands

By Bob Unruh
Published May 29, 2021 at 3:42pm

A South Dakota farmer is suing the federal government after its Agriculture Department ordered him not to farm his farm.

It seems the Washington bureaucrats have determined that a mud puddle in one of his fields is a protected "wetlands."

The fight is being taken up by Pacific Legal Foundation.

Arlen Foster's action is against the federal department, Tom Vilsack as secretary, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and others.

He's a third-generation farm working land on the plains of South Dakota. But in 2011, a division of the Department of Agriculture ruled that a small seasonal mud puddle on his farm really isn't a mud puddle, but a "wetlands."

That's even though the government "has no authority to regulate such puddles," the legal team said.
...

Farmer sues after being ordered not to work his farm

I made a thread about this when Obama/Biden/democrats began to use the re-written Clean Water Act as an excuse to take over farmer's lands.
That was many years ago and it would take me a while to find that thread.

Anyway, the left in the forums kept claiming that this re-writing of the Clean Water Act was to really protect the quality of our water, but since the start it was obvious it was only an excuse to take over farmer's lands, and this is one of many examples.






edit on 29-5-2021 by ElectricUniverse because: correct comment.



posted on May, 29 2021 @ 07:33 PM
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That's just ridiculous, I don't even know what to say about this.

Good catch though, definitely look forward to an update.



posted on May, 29 2021 @ 07:38 PM
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What race is the farmer? I believe he qualifies for some help under the latest stimulus package. That is of course if he meets the...um criteria.
edit on 29-5-2021 by ManSizedSquirrel because: Squirrel hands



posted on May, 29 2021 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

Punish anyone or any group that is not hardcore leftist and refuses to "Kamala" democrat leaders.



posted on May, 29 2021 @ 10:07 PM
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Drill a hole about five feet or so deep to get through the clay layer and the pond will disappear. or just pull some topsoil into the low spot in the field. I suppose field drainage ditches are now protected too since they have water in them in the spring.

I thought Trump reversed a bunch of those Obama rules that were overboard. I suppose Biden used an executive order to get rid of Trump's fix of the problem. Well, if the farmer cannot plant crops in the field, he can just seed the land and get cows to graze in it. The price of beef is up.



posted on May, 29 2021 @ 10:34 PM
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They might as well ban all farmers in that area, as well as MN, ND. There are so many 'mud-puddles' it isn't funny. Farmers have been scrambling the last 10 years installing drainage hose systems all over the place to get rid of all their puddles but there's only so much hose I guess. I personally believe it's wrong to eff with mother nature in that way and I don't think it's a good idea in the long run but that's beside the point.

Ridiculous I say. I hope he wins.



posted on May, 29 2021 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: M5xaz

Can you imagine her negotiating with other world leaders?



posted on May, 29 2021 @ 11:25 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

If I knew how, I'd embed the John Cougar Mellencamp "Rain on the Scarecrow" vid.

Seems appropriate.

youtu.be..." target="_blank" class="postlink">youtu.be...


edit on 29-5-2021 by EdisonintheFM because: Link???



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

Why not fill in the gap with dirt, I mean I've been doing that since I started gardening. I honestly doubt filling such a hole would be difficult to accomplish with almost no effort, maybe one hour tops. Oh and then the "wetland" would theoretically be gone, correct?



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: RussianSpy

How does one puddle become classified as "wetlands", why not call it a pond...something's not right here with this, I need to see the whole area from Google Earth.



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 12:32 AM
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One issue South Dakota faces (not sure about other states) is that if it ends up becoming a certain amount of water, 4 or maybe 5 feet deep, it becomes state property.

Have a friend who's great grandfather had lost a couple acres and fields because of heavy rainfall quite a few years back. As its drying up, that land still belongs to the state because his great grandfather passed away before it could be given back to him and passed on to his family from his will.

It seems kind of malicious.



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 02:07 AM
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originally posted by: Guiltyguitarist
a reply to: M5xaz

Can you imagine her negotiating with other world leaders?


Orally ?






posted on May, 30 2021 @ 05:45 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

This is what it looks like in the summer. I'm willing to bet that things are different in the winter, and that the farmer has done his level best to drain the land to maximise his acrage.

I grew up in a small town surrounded by farmland. Farmers were often found to have tried to expand their farmable acreage by doing things that they shouldn't have such as draining wetlands or cutting down ancient trees.

We had all kinds of problems with farmers destroying field boundaries, and removing scrub that was holding the soil and trapping water, which increased their acreage in the short run, but in the long run lead the top soil to erode and left the land barren.



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 05:47 AM
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originally posted by: EdisonintheFM
a reply to: RussianSpy

How does one puddle become classified as "wetlands", why not call it a pond...something's not right here with this, I need to see the whole area from Google Earth.


Bet you a dollar that it didn't used to look like that. The farmer probably had it drained. Plus this picture is obviously after the harvest has been brought in. In winter that "puddle" is probably a lot bigger, especially after it rains.

100 years ago that "puddle" might hare been a fully fledged wetland.



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 06:58 AM
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originally posted by: AaarghZombies

originally posted by: EdisonintheFM
a reply to: RussianSpy

How does one puddle become classified as "wetlands", why not call it a pond...something's not right here with this, I need to see the whole area from Google Earth.


Bet you a dollar that it didn't used to look like that. The farmer probably had it drained. Plus this picture is obviously after the harvest has been brought in. In winter that "puddle" is probably a lot bigger, especially after it rains.

100 years ago that "puddle" might hare been a fully fledged wetland.


I'll bet you are wrong.



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 09:06 AM
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The Governor (Kristy Noam) needs to intervene in this case and protect this farmers Right to use his land as he sees fit.

He shouldnt have to do this on his own.

Ridiculous. If I were the Farmer, I'd just give them the middle finger and work my land, and force them to come and stop me by force. Hopefully, Governor Noam would then step in and protect him and kick the feds out.


originally posted by: ElectricUniverse
Remember Obama's re-writing of the Clean Water Act? Here is one of many examples showing how Obama/Biden/Democrats re-wrote the Clean Water Act to take over farmers' lands with the excuse that seasonal puddles, and seasonal runoffs are "protected wetlands..."

The South Dakota farmer was ordered in 2011 not to farm in his own farm because of this seasonal puddle that forms in his land which has been in his family since the early 1900.

This is a picture of the puddle that democrats claim must be protected, hence the farmer cannot farm in his own land...



So the farmer is now suing back


Farmer sues after being ordered not to work his farm
Ag Department rules a mud puddle is protected wetlands

By Bob Unruh
Published May 29, 2021 at 3:42pm

A South Dakota farmer is suing the federal government after its Agriculture Department ordered him not to farm his farm.

It seems the Washington bureaucrats have determined that a mud puddle in one of his fields is a protected "wetlands."

The fight is being taken up by Pacific Legal Foundation.

Arlen Foster's action is against the federal department, Tom Vilsack as secretary, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and others.

He's a third-generation farm working land on the plains of South Dakota. But in 2011, a division of the Department of Agriculture ruled that a small seasonal mud puddle on his farm really isn't a mud puddle, but a "wetlands."

That's even though the government "has no authority to regulate such puddles," the legal team said.
...

Farmer sues after being ordered not to work his farm

I made a thread about this when Obama/Biden/democrats began to use the re-written Clean Water Act as an excuse to take over farmer's lands.
That was many years ago and it would take me a while to find that thread.

Anyway, the left in the forums kept claiming that this re-writing of the Clean Water Act was to really protect the quality of our water, but since the start it was obvious it was only an excuse to take over farmer's lands, and this is one of many examples.








posted on May, 30 2021 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

I read the article earlier on another site and agree this guy
needs to fight this ridiculous order.I have a corner of my
driveway that collects a lot of water after a rainfall,trying
to declare it a wetland is about the same.



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: AaarghZombies

True. I do remember reading somewhere, or hearing from someone, that America at one time was...a fifth or fourth wetlands/swamp...can't recall accurately. I do know in my home area, lots of swamp. And where I live at the moment was swampland, and the city tried to build drainage ditches behind the houses and apartments, but they do not drain well. This month is the first time in over a year that the ditch was dry.

Doesn't each state now have conservation laws protecting wetlands, that a certain percentage must be protected to preserve ecosystems? Or is that federal laws, I've forgotten so much I can't keep up anymore.



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 11:07 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Drill a hole about five feet or so deep to get through the clay layer and the pond will disappear. or just pull some topsoil into the low spot in the field.


That's exactly the kind of behavior that leads to farmland turning into a dust-bowl




I suppose field drainage ditches are now protected too


Yes, Yes, and thrice yes. This is an actual thing that anybody raised in a farming town will tell you.

Drainage ditches need protection because of the danger of runoff entering watercourses through them. Insecticide, pesticide or fertilizer runoff has a habit of contaminating rivers and streams, they kill fish, can harm watering cattle, and can contaminate reservoirs used for drinking water.

These regulations aren't put in place just to screw you over. They're needed to protect farmer and small town residents (The majority of whom are Republicans) from irresponsible land owners.

Wetlands need protecting because they soak up rainwater and snow melt, which prevents flooding and dustbowl conditions. They also help preserve biodiversity which improves the quality of the surrounding land.

I can tell form this thread that maybe 80% of the people here are city folk or live in the burbs.



posted on May, 30 2021 @ 11:10 AM
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originally posted by: EdisonintheFM
a reply to: AaarghZombies

Doesn't each state now have conservation laws protecting wetlands, that a certain percentage must be protected to preserve ecosystems? Or is that federal laws, I've forgotten so much I can't keep up anymore.



From memory, Trump removed a lot of those protections. He declared that certain classes of waterway were outside oft he waterways protection legislation. Which means that any state that wants to protect them could be sued by a landowner as those state laws would contradict federal ones.

I know tat he was trying to do this, I can't remember if he ever signed it into law or not.



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