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Is the Paranormal normal.

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posted on May, 15 2021 @ 10:20 PM
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The question is an interesting one insomuch when we see Orbs, or ghosts are we just seeing part of some superior technology that to us with not a whiff of understanding can induce fear and superstition. Just like a fighter jet that flys over a native village, where they haven't got the concepts of what goes into making this type of plane. Thus its interpreted as it can only be interpreted with only the tools of the belief structure present in that village at the said time of the incident. So using something like an ancient Hindu belief system which can be used to enlarge some life concepts, like the Human having five bodies the physical usually being interpreted as being the lowest. I am saying Hindu as parts of the religion could be the most ancient along with Buddhism which could have come from a similar root religion or rather a way of life that proved to be the least troublesome. Being probably the most materialistic civilization up to the present this same materialism is making sure we haven't the tools in the tool chest to work out what we are doing here or rather why we live and die.
So I came across this guy who had an NDE, who gets a tour of the afterlife ( for want of a better word) where he literally says it's like being on the holodeck of a Startrek movie. He reports many technologies. Many worlds in the Universe supporting life.The ability of the people over there to be able to go back in time and watch events unfolding, of. planning and choosing life experiences for the sake of an educational understanding, simply for personal growth. Because according to the laws of material physics, the chances of getting to any star system with a human body and surviving will always be stretching the probabilities to the max. But if we have bodies with a mind that can literally think our ways around the Universe we would have to exist in a different state to what we do now, as always it would be our belief system limiting what we thought was possible or impossible, and hence doable or not doable. This guy has an NDE with a fairly open mind, at the age of about twenty and with a Catholic upbringing, the only bit of Catholicism that seems to be there is a meeting with a being he says must have been Jesus but not necessarily
so, this is the most detailed one i have seen so I thought it was worth sharing.
,



posted on May, 15 2021 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: anonentity

"Beside" normal is not normal. Just like "alternate truths" aren't.

edit on 15/5/2021 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2021 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Well there is truth, your truths, and facts



posted on May, 15 2021 @ 11:41 PM
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This Universe is low tech compared to us. We are Super Human Angel/Demon. We are far more powerful then we currently know;. Remember " Faith of a mustard seed, could move a mountain." I believe that to be literal



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 12:22 AM
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originally posted by: visitedbythem
This Universe is low tech compared to us. We are Super Human Angel/Demon. We are far more powerful then we currently know;. Remember " Faith of a mustard seed, could move a mountain." I believe that to be literal


I believe this too. I long time ago when I figured out how to lucid dream, that was then the end of any nightmares. I retain complete domination and control over my dreams when I deem necessary. Other than that as long as my dreams are pleasant I remain natural.

What you have said above, us being super human is why they (any non physical entity) needs your permission to take any sort of control or action against you. They only can prey on those of us that do not know how to fight them. I can take on legions, or even their entire realm if I wanted to.

Understand though we are spirit before body. The body is not where our strength comes from but there are some entities that are jealous that we have the privilege of taking the form of flesh when they cannot.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 12:46 AM
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I think the prefix explains what (para)normal is.
"normal" is a word used for other things.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 01:34 AM
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originally posted by: rom12345
I think the prefix explains what (para)normal is.
"normal" is a word used for other things.


"Normal" is a matter of perspective. From our in-the-flesh perspective anything beyond the physical could by our standards be considered "paranormal". However from "their" perspective they can fully see their activities as well as ours, all at once, at will.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 02:29 AM
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Heck, a "normal" as defined as a repeated experience by some wet bag-like automaton that spends most of it's brief existence engaged in a usually unpleasant, repetitive, hierarchical experience when they'd rather do almost anything else and who periodically consumes other automatons, breaks them down before anterior expulsion, and who serially changes conscious states, all the while thinking of complex abstractions but mostly of trivialities and mingling with other automatons that are different, yet the same, all on some environment thought to hurl through eternity? That normal?

Whatever definition is applied, the only "normal" is not at all normal.

But yeah, the things most consider weird these days probably happen in numbers that define them as some measure of routine.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 03:00 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

While that sounds like a good explanation on paper, in practice it falls apart because there is a distinct lack of consistency. Which would be the case if many of these things were a manufactured or artificial in nature.

If you look at superficial details some phenomena seem similar but the more detail you get the more different they seem.

For example, if you were to take 10 people who'd never seen a commercial racing drone (Like, maybe somebody from a remote Amazon tribe or an elderly person living in a remote Indian village), and you were to suddenly buzz them without warming, they would in all likelihood report something that was mostly consistent. And the more information you gained from them the more consistent their reports would be.

But with a lot of the other phenomena details tend to vary wildly. You wouldn't have one person describing the drone as buzzing and another describing it as playing classical music even if they were different models or brands.

So, unless the phenomena that you're talking about are manufactured using different technologies and for different purposes, and unless there are literally thousands of different ones. Then they are't manufactured.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 03:36 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: chr0naut

Well there is truth, your truths, and facts



Nah, mate, there aren't shades of truth.

It's an absolute.

An 'almost truth' doesn't cut it.

edit on 16/5/2021 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 04:09 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

Thruth is such a meable construct, and very much defined by the zeitgeist...

Everybody knows that it is impossible until there came one who didn't know, and did it...



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 06:39 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

How do scientists explain UFO’s? The late Dr. Donald H. Menzel, a Harvard astronomer, and Philip Klass, former senior editor of Aviation Week, are among those who have studied the subject of UFO sightings. They affirm that UFO’s are actually IFO’s (identified flying objects). When investigated, UFO’s have turned out to be identifiable things or effects, such as weather balloons, nighttime advertising airplanes and helicopters, meteors, or sun dogs. (A sun dog, or parhelion, is a bright spot that appears on either side of the sun, also known as a mock sun.)

Philip Klass explained UFO’s as natural phenomena or as incorrect identifications. Klass’s thought is that people who are suddenly exposed to a brief unexpected event “may be grossly inaccurate in trying to describe precisely what they have seen.”

In his book Pseudoscience and the Paranormal, Terence Hines states that “careful investigation has resulted in straightforward natural explanations for even very impressive-sounding UFO reports. . . . All these cases make clear the nearly total unreliability of eyewitness reports. In almost every case, the witnesses’ reports differed substantially from the actual stimulus, but in only a very few cases were the witnesses willfully lying. Their knowledge about what UFOs ‘ought’ to look like influenced their reports, along with the effects of visual illusions.”

“The more thorough investigation [summarized in the Condon Report] has clarified the part played by physical and psychological distortions. It has explained how ordinary objects, seen in the sky by persons who do not recognize them under the perhaps unusual circumstances, can be misconstrued in perception, magnified in the telling, further exaggerated in the newspapers, and end up as spaceships landing little green men from Mars.” (What the “Saucers” Proved to Be (Awake!—1970)

Something similar is probably affecting NDEs as well, and sightings of ghosts and such (especially the phrase I bolded previously, just swap out UFOs with NDEs or ghosts). Psychologist Ronald Siegel says regarding near-death and out-of-body experiences: “These experiences are common to a wide variety of arousal in the human brain, including '___', sensory deprivation and extreme stress. The stress is producing the projection of the images into the brain. They are the same for most people because our brains are all wired similarly to store information, and these experiences are basically electrical read-outs of this wiring.”

Dr. Richard Blacher of Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, wrote: “I suggest that people who undergo these ‘death experiences’ are suffering from a hypoxic [oxygen deficiency] state, during which they try to deal psychologically with the anxieties provoked by the medical procedures and talk. . . . We are dealing here with the fantasy of death, not with death itself. This fantasy [within the patient’s psyche, or mind] is most appealing, since it solves several human concerns at one time. . . . The physician must be especially wary of accepting religious belief as scientific data.”

Siegel indicates another interesting point about the “visions” of the nearly dead: “As in hallucinations, the visions of the afterlife are suspiciously like this world, according to the accounts provided by dying patients themselves.” For example, a 63-year-old man who had spent much of his life in Texas related his “vision” as follows: “I was suspended over a fence. . . . On one side of the fence it was extremely scraggly territory, mesquite brush . . . On the other side of the fence was the most beautiful pasture scene I guess I have ever seen . . . [It was] a three- or four-strand barbed-wire fence.” Did this patient actually see barbed wire in “heaven” or in the realm beyond death? It is obvious that these images were based on his life in Texas and recalled from his own brain data bank​—unless we are being asked to believe that there is barbed wire “on the other side”!

In fact, so many NDEs are closely related to the patients’ experiences and background in life that it is unreasonable to believe that they are having a glimpse of a realm beyond death. For example, do those NDE patients who see a “being of light” see the same person regardless of whether they are Christian, Jewish, Hindu or Muslim? In his book Life After Life, Dr. Raymond Moody explains: “The identification of the being varies from individual to individual and seems to be largely a function of the religious background, training, or beliefs of the person involved. [compare with the earlier bolded phrase concerning UFOs] Thus, most of those who are Christians . . . identify the light as Christ . . . A Jewish man and woman identified the light as an ‘angel.’”

At a strictly scientific level, Dr. Ring admits: “I remind my audiences that what I have studied are near-death experiences, not after-death experiences. . . . There is obviously no guarantee either that these experiences will continue to unfold in a way consistent with their beginnings or indeed that they will continue at all. That, I believe, is the correct scientific position to take on the significance of these experiences.”

As for death, psychologist Siegel gives his opinion: “Death, in terms of its physical sequels, is no mystery. After death the body disintegrates and is reabsorbed into the inanimate component of the environment. The dead human loses both his life and his consciousness. . . . The most logical guess is that consciousness shares the same fate as that of the corpse. Surprisingly, this commonsense view is not the prevalent one, and the majority of mankind . . . continue to exert their basic motivation to stay alive and formulate a myriad of beliefs concerning man’s survival after death.”

About 3,000 years ago the same “commonsense view” was given by a king who wrote: “For the living are conscious that they will die; but as for the dead, they are conscious of nothing at all, neither do they anymore have wages, because the remembrance of them has been forgotten. Also, their love and their hate and their jealousy have already perished, and they have no portion anymore to time indefinite in anything that has to be done under the sun. All that your hand finds to do, do with your very power, for there is no work nor devising nor knowledge nor wisdom in Sheol [mankind’s common grave], the place to which you are going.”​—Ecclesiastes 9:5, 6, 10.

Certainly the Bible leaves no room for considering near-death experiences as a prelude to life after death. King Solomon’s description of death and its effects has no hints of an immortal soul surviving into some other form of conscious existence. The dead “are conscious of nothing at all.”

Of course, those who practice spiritism and communication with the “dead” are only too pleased to have the apparent support of hundreds of near-death experiences. Psychologist Siegel quotes one lecturer on the paranormal, or supernatural, as saying that “if we are to examine the evidence for an afterlife honestly and dispassionately we must free ourselves from the tyranny of common sense.” (Psychology Today, January 1981) Interestingly, this same lecturer “argues that ghosts and apparitions are indeed hallucinations, but they are projected telepathically from the minds of dead people to those of the living!” That certainly does not agree with Solomon’s conclusion that the dead are dead and know nothing.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 06:46 AM
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originally posted by: whereislogic
a reply to: anonentity

... Psychologist Ronald Siegel says regarding near-death and out-of-body experiences: “These experiences are common to a wide variety of arousal in the human brain, including '___', sensory deprivation and extreme stress. The stress is producing the projection of the images into the brain. They are the same for most people because our brains are all wired similarly to store information, and these experiences are basically electrical read-outs of this wiring.”

After "including" there is a name of a drug that is being censored out by ATS, it consists of 3 letters, starting with an "L", ending with a "D" and having an "S" in the middle.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

That which appears to be real, is not. The reality we live each day...is not....reality.

"Para"- prefix: ie: "above normal".

Are things real, or normal....? Not when "normal" isn't real, and "real" is above what's considered "normal".

Therefore...the Astral world...holds all...all.things simultaneously eternally.

Orbs and ghosts, shape shifters, fairies....all exist. Otherwise.....we wouldn't be discussing this!

"Perspective" doesn't isolate...it comes from accumulated information.

I can answer (metaphorically) the UFO question once and for all: they are absolutely, positively objects...unidentified, flying in the air.

So, as well ..the issue is paranormal is real...but that does not negate its importance...or reality
edit on 16-5-2021 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: whereislogic

Then too...life is only death that failed.

Death..is only life, succeeded.

There is no death....live, renew, replace, try again....until we get it right.

Is not to keep us alive in this awful world...but to successfully transition us to the next...or worse.

We have to come back to this crap all over.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

Something should be said about "Tulpas". Things that we create because we give it energy



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 08:31 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

Not really sure what you're trying to say that we don't already accept as truth. Does/would look like magic to us.


One.thing I will say though.

I do hate when people make the UFO/UAP stuff "mystical"/"spiritual" etc. It's really weird when people try to take the angle that it's not a physical phenomenon,.or that ET is something "supernatural"... Or any of the stuff people go into about them feeding off.our "energy" etc.

So I guess to answer your question...

Yes. Paranormal, when discussing ET, UAP/UFOs...should not.be a seperate category from normal. We should be thinking about and approaching ET/UFOs in the same way as we approach Biology and other material science. It's ankther part of.our physical and interactive world that is very much concrete.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 09:09 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut



It's an absolute.


No, facts may be absolute, truth isn't.

www.britannica.com...


Unfortunately, many philosophers doubt whether an acceptable explanation of facts and correspondence can be given. Facts, as they point out, are strange entities. It is tempting to think of them as structures or arrangements of things in the world. However, as the Austrian-born philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein observed, structures have spatial locations, but facts do not. The Eiffel Tower can be moved from Paris to Rome, but the fact that the Eiffel Tower is in Paris cannot be moved anywhere. Furthermore, critics urge, the very idea of what the facts are in a given case is nothing apart from people’s sincere beliefs about the case, which means those beliefs that people take to be true.

Thus, there is no enterprise of first forming a belief or theory about some matter and then in some new process stepping outside the belief or theory to assess whether it corresponds with the facts. There are, indeed, processes of checking and verifying beliefs, but they work by bringing up further beliefs and perceptions and assessing the original in light of those. In actual investigations, what tells people what to believe is not the world or the facts but how they interpret the world or select and conceptualize the facts.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 02:07 PM
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If anything I would say the problem is that this world itself isn't normal. And it hasn't been "normal" for thousands of years.

Something I learned from the bible. Book of Hosea. Israel and Judah were to face a long term top level Leviticus 26 curse that was supposed to last 2000 years. And before that there was a number of smaller curses of varying intensities. So all things considered including the history of the Jews I would say it's been at least 56 generations since anyone has seen what could be called normal. This world is cursed. And it's shocking most of all that almost no one knows about it.

So I would say there's been a veil placed between humanity and what could be called supernatural. And the little we do see of it is leakage around and through the veil.



posted on May, 16 2021 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: chr0naut



It's an absolute.


No, facts may be absolute, truth isn't.

www.britannica.com...


Unfortunately, many philosophers doubt whether an acceptable explanation of facts and correspondence can be given. Facts, as they point out, are strange entities. It is tempting to think of them as structures or arrangements of things in the world. However, as the Austrian-born philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein observed, structures have spatial locations, but facts do not. The Eiffel Tower can be moved from Paris to Rome, but the fact that the Eiffel Tower is in Paris cannot be moved anywhere. Furthermore, critics urge, the very idea of what the facts are in a given case is nothing apart from people’s sincere beliefs about the case, which means those beliefs that people take to be true.

Thus, there is no enterprise of first forming a belief or theory about some matter and then in some new process stepping outside the belief or theory to assess whether it corresponds with the facts. There are, indeed, processes of checking and verifying beliefs, but they work by bringing up further beliefs and perceptions and assessing the original in light of those. In actual investigations, what tells people what to believe is not the world or the facts but how they interpret the world or select and conceptualize the facts.


Tied into the issue of "alternate truths", is the issue of "alternate facts". The words are almost interchangeable if you accept compromise to such basic precepts.

The same arguments applied as explication of "alternate truths" can equally be ascribed to "alternate facts", and pretty soon, nothing has any clear and definite meaning anymore.

Truth, as a concept, is absolute, because anything not that, is untruth.

Facts as a concept, are absolute, because anything that is not a fact, is not factual.




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