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Anyone Here Ever Install Shiplap Siding? ( Exterior)

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posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 03:24 PM
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So I'm building a house, paying cash, no loans involved. 1400 sq. ft. Yes, the price of lumber is crazy, I picked a bad time to build.

However I got a good deal on some pine siding, its the quarter log, ship-lap style. Well, as I am trimming out my windows and doors, getting ready to put on the actual siding, a thought crossed my mind about what to do with the butt ends. I have scoured the internet and there is not a whole lot of information on this process, at least not very thorough. The ends that meet the trim around the house corners and windows, they can be caulked. But you really wouldn't want to caulk the butt-ends out in the middle of the wall.

I have read that with the regular style of lap siding ( just regular board style), behind each butt crack ( haha) you place a small hunk of flashing that gets smashed between the lower course, therefore no water makes it behind the siding and into the sheathing. Well, that process is difficult to do with this log type siding.

Now, I do have wrap on the house over the OSB, but there are staples holding it on. While that would probably protect the OSB, the water would still make its way into the crack and down behind the rest of the siding below. Im sort of at a stand still till I figure this out.

Anyone ever have to deal with this? Maybe should have just went with vinyl instead of buying actual wood siding? Help!

Thanks!



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:00 PM
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I have seen this done a couple different ways, all involve the corner/window/door trim all installed before starting the wood siding

Most run everything tight & caulk the siding ends during install ( siding to siding or siding to trim ), then once complete another caulking on all siding to trim joints

The 2nd version of this I've seen is the same as above but they cut all the siding to siding butt joints at an angle much like interior trim butt joints

I've also seen flashing installed as you mentioned for regular wood lap siding but rather than metal flashing they use 15# felt cut in strips so that it will lap onto the piece of siding below, with this style install they also flash at the siding to trim joints and then follow up with caulk after all siding is installed

Please remember your drip cap at windows & doors - this is the #1 entry point for moisture with wood siding when missed

Hope this helps and hope to see some photos of the finished project posted when you are done
edit on 4/1/2021 by Sostratus because: clarity



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:09 PM
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+1 on the butt joint metal flashing.
Then I run a clear vertical bead of silicone on the butt ends, then slide together. Stay in middle so you dont get ugly squeeze out. If you can get your joints near studs, then even better.
Mark wrap vertically every 16 where your studs are prior to install, if you haven't already, so screws/nails on siding go into studs, not sheathing.
Easy to locate, just feel for crack between sheets and stretch a tape off that reference point.
Good luck.
edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: Sp

edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: Added2



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: standingwave

What is the final exterior finish on the boards going to be, paint or stain?

I assume when you say 'quarter log' you mean that the exterior of the boards has a slight curvature to it, right? Or am I not understanding you properly? So, in essence the finished product will have a log cabin look to it, right? Or, do you just mean quarter-sawn lumber?

Yes, you are correct that the typical way you would trim this is with a siding clip which is a piece of metal flashing shaped like a "T" and fits between the two siding pieces and the end tucks under the bottom of the boards. But with a curved board this would indeed be difficult because you can't really bend those siding clips to meet the curve without warping the vertical portion of the "T".

Here's a couple things you could do:

1. You could place a piece of ice guard on the Tyvek (I assume this is what you used when you say you wrapped the OSB) right where the joint will be. I'd probably make the ice guard at least 1" larger than the joint all the way around (i.e. wider and taller). The ice guard has adhesive on it so you won't have to use fasteners to hold it in place. I'd also overlap the bottom edge and trim that off with a utility knife after the next row is installed. If painting, you'll still caulk the joint, but caulk joints in siding are exposed to so much thermal movement all the caulk really does is let you get a uniform coat of paint on it.

2. Another option would be to buy a roll of flat aluminum flashing about 3/4" to 1" wide. Then at each joint you'll need to cut a piece about 2" longer than the joint. Then tuck the flashing under the upper row of siding, run it down over the joint and form it so it will either sandwich under the boards of the joint you're working on, or the row below it.

3. Another method which will work if your joints will all be stacked is you can use a batton strip all the way down. Personally, I don't really like this method though because it screams "JOINT" at me every time I look at it, but some people like it.

Those are some methods I've used on similar applications in the past.

Just some ideas.

Hope it helps.



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: Sostratus



Please remember your drip cap at windows & doors - this is the #1 entry point for moisture with wood siding when missed


^^^^^^^DEFINITELY THIS!!^^^^^^^^



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:42 PM
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On a funny note, you could always ask Joanna Gaines (from the TV show "Fixer-Upper")!

That woman used "shiplap" for everything! I think she only had one word in her entire vocabulary and it was "shiplap"...LOL!!

You could play a drinking game with how many times she said the word "shiplap" in every episode, but just make sure you had a really BIG bottle of liquor, cuz you were getting hammered!



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:44 PM
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originally posted by: Sostratus
I have seen this done a couple different ways, all involve the corner/window/door trim all installed before starting the wood siding

Most run everything tight & caulk the siding ends during install ( siding to siding or siding to trim ), then once complete another caulking on all siding to trim joints

The 2nd version of this I've seen is the same as above but they cut all the siding to siding butt joints at an angle much like interior trim butt joints

I've also seen flashing installed as you mentioned for regular wood lap siding but rather than metal flashing they use 15# felt cut in strips so that it will lap onto the piece of siding below, with this style install they also flash at the siding to trim joints and then follow up with caulk after all siding is installed

Please remember your drip cap at windows & doors - this is the #1 entry point for moisture with wood siding when missed

Hope this helps and hope to see some photos of the finished project posted when you are done


This sounds like what I was thinking, just wasn't sure. I have some felt let over from the roof, and I also have some really sticky black tape type of flashing I put around all the windows, over the nail skirting. I like the felt idea because maybe I could just use a small staple to hold it in place, then when the board on top is nailed in, just use a sharp knife to cut off the tag sticking out.

What is the drip cap you speak of?

It will be a while till I get the photos, I'm very slow. Still have the usual 40 hour or more per week job taking up all my time.



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:46 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
+1 on the butt joint metal flashing.
Then I run a clear vertical bead of silicone on the butt ends, then slide together. Stay in middle so you dont get ugly squeeze out. If you can get your joints near studs, then even better.
Mark wrap vertically every 16 where your studs are prior to install, if you haven't already, so screws/nails on siding go into studs, not sheathing.
Easy to locate, just feel for crack between sheets and stretch a tape off that reference point.
Good luck.


Got it! And I found that framing nails are way too big. I couldnt find anything mid-size as far as finishing nails that had any holding power, so I found 3" long painted screws with a small head that I think will hold as long as I hit the studs!



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: standingwave

What is the final exterior finish on the boards going to be, paint or stain?

I assume when you say 'quarter log' you mean that the exterior of the boards has a slight curvature to it, right? Or am I not understanding you properly? So, in essence the finished product will have a log cabin look to it, right? Or, do you just mean quarter-sawn lumber?

Yes, you are correct that the typical way you would trim this is with a siding clip which is a piece of metal flashing shaped like a "T" and fits between the two siding pieces and the end tucks under the bottom of the boards. But with a curved board this would indeed be difficult because you can't really bend those siding clips to meet the curve without warping the vertical portion of the "T".

Here's a couple things you could do:

1. You could place a piece of ice guard on the Tyvek (I assume this is what you used when you say you wrapped the OSB) right where the joint will be. I'd probably make the ice guard at least 1" larger than the joint all the way around (i.e. wider and taller). The ice guard has adhesive on it so you won't have to use fasteners to hold it in place. I'd also overlap the bottom edge and trim that off with a utility knife after the next row is installed. If painting, you'll still caulk the joint, but caulk joints in siding are exposed to so much thermal movement all the caulk really does is let you get a uniform coat of paint on it.

2. Another option would be to buy a roll of flat aluminum flashing about 3/4" to 1" wide. Then at each joint you'll need to cut a piece about 2" longer than the joint. Then tuck the flashing under the upper row of siding, run it down over the joint and form it so it will either sandwich under the boards of the joint you're working on, or the row below it.

3. Another method which will work if your joints will all be stacked is you can use a batton strip all the way down. Personally, I don't really like this method though because it screams "JOINT" at me every time I look at it, but some people like it.

Those are some methods I've used on similar applications in the past.

Just some ideas.

Hope it helps.



Yes, its log type siding, I guess its called that because you can put four of them together in a square and it would form the circle, or log looking from the end? Im sure they were milled from actual lumber and not actual logs. There is also a back-relief milled out on the backside, just a curved portion taken out all the way down the board.

I like the idea of cutting off the strip after the top row is nailed in. Not possible with metal flashing, but do-able with felt or other thin flexible material.

And yes, Im going to alternate the joints, no way I want them in the same line!

Thanks! I think I can do this!



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: standingwave

They make flashing nails just for these kinds of things. They sort of look like roofing nails, but shorter.



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
On a funny note, you could always ask Joanna Gaines (from the TV show "Fixer-Upper")!

That woman used "shiplap" for everything! I think she only had one word in her entire vocabulary and it was "shiplap"...LOL!!

You could play a drinking game with how many times she said the word "shiplap" in every episode, but just make sure you had a really BIG bottle of liquor, cuz you were getting hammered!


Well....just so you know, Im only going with the shiplap on the OUTSIDE, LOL.

Drywall INSIDE!



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: standingwave

The flashing material I'm talking about is very, very, thin (so thin you can cut yourself with it if not careful). It's similar to gutter extrusion metal, and it bends very easily.

The felt will work, but I'd actually recommend ice-guard instead. Ice-guard will last forever whereas roofing felt will eventually deteriorate.



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: standingwave

Yeah..I just run GRK brand RT composite trim head screws w a t10 head.
Lowes or home repo sells them.
They give a little more bite with the "double thread" design...since the head is so small and doesn't provide much pullout resistance.
They almost disappear and don't show. They have a dull gold color.
The bigger ones I've used on structural timber look like a big 8" version of these. Not sure the brand though.

edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: Add



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 06:20 PM
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a reply to: standingwave



Drip cap will go directly above your top piece of window/door casing before the wood siding so that any moisture blown under your siding at that joint will run off over your casing and not behind it - this joint would not receive caulk from the siding to drip cap so as not to trap any moisture

You can bend some up if you have a siding brake or pick it up at any big box store or lumber yard

I agree with FCD,ice & water guard will last longer than felt if you have some available but I've never seen siding out last felt - should be OK with either

The sticky black tape would be good to seal the drip cap to your house wrap before siding and really it never hurts to put that stuff at every opening

Good luck with everything !

edit on 4/1/2021 by Sostratus because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 06:31 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
a reply to: standingwave

Yeah..I just run GRK brand RT composite trim head screws w a t10 head.
Lowes or home repo sells them.
They give a little more bite with the "double thread" design...since the head is so small and doesn't provide much pullout resistance.
They almost disappear and don't show. They have a dull gold color.
The bigger ones I've used on structural timber look like a big 8" version of these. Not sure the brand though.


This is an excellent idea - I have seen wood siding and even cement board siding pull nails loose




posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: Sostratus

That's kind of out of date to currently used materials and fenestration installations.
Windows aren't really built/used that way anymore.
Thats an old school diagram.

Look up modified I cut for the wrap.
The process used now is modified I cut on wrap, back-caulked nail fin, then flashing tape across bottom, sides, then top, with the top going across, then under wrap. You can do a drip cap extra, but it's unnecessary.
Framers usually screw up the process.
I used to run a window company and am AAMA certified for installation of fenestration in res and light commercial and my fam manufactures windows, so I have a little experience.
Huge leak point in construction, everybody watch this step closely when they build.
Added... the best caulking I've ever used for the exposed joints is Sonneborn np1..hands down. Stay away from vulkem crap.
Modified I cut is tough to explai..but basically your wrap goes completely over opening, then looking at the opening from outside, you slice an I out of it cutting across top, bottom and down center of opening. Loose wrap is folded and stapled inside, then you make 45 degree cuts just long enough to get tape width into. That piece of wrap above is folded up, window installed and taped, then flap coes down over fin and tape, then tape 45's..if that makes sense.


edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: Sp

edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: Added

edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: Sp

edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: Added2

edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: Sp..sorry phoneposting



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

i agree - without knowing the windows/trim being used in this application it was the easiest detail I could quickly find to show what drip cap is

All good points and I'll look into the Sonneborn



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: Sostratus

Oh, my bad..yeah the stuff is ridiculous.
The distribution place here has a test.
It is 2 pieces of 12" aluminum bar...they are hooked together with a 1/4" bead about 3" long and you can try and pry it apart. Massive leverage on a small bead. I thought I'd do it easily...nope
Stuff has less evaporative chems in it then vulkem, so actually lasts, plus tools and cleans better than it as well.
Np1 stands for 1 part urethane



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 09:01 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

It's all good

Trying not to hi-jack this thread but I'm racking my brains on some flashing myself

Working out window flashing on a post-frame with T1-11 siding, the walls have 2x4 girts running horizontal with 2x4's picture framed for window opening, T1-11 siding applied directly to the 2x4's ( with vapor barrier )

It's for a buddy and he wants all wood trim - no brake metal

Windows are not purchased yet, I'm leaning on framing 2x window buck and installing remods if I can't come up with a good flashing detail at the T1-11 to wood trim, problem I'm running into is the groove cut into the T1-11

Open to any suggestions

Sorry standingwave if I'm hi-jacking this thread for you...just thinking this might open up suggestions for your project also


edit on 4/1/2021 by Sostratus because: spelling



posted on Apr, 1 2021 @ 10:32 PM
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I put some thicker stuff on one time and it was endmatched...lapped over by a shiplap seam. I am not sure what kind you have. If there is no endmatch, a little bit of tin between the seam area might be advisable. That would make it drip over the next piece. Is it shiplap top and bottom? There are half a dozen styles of it.

I have put bevel lap siding on two or three times and done some shingle jobs on additions and patching of walls in remodeling. I never put the cement lap siding on, but have seen demonstations done at the dinners from lumber yards with salesmen and demonstrators.

Being an active residential builder for over twenty years, I have done many types of construction till I got disabled about fifteen plus years ago. I did do some work with friends after that, but did not take anymore jobs because I could not trust that I could finish them on a schedule with my epilepsy. I still have my builders license, but only help out friends now but cannot go on a high ladder or roof much because of the epilepsy. I may tackle building another house on my second lot here then give this house to my daughter or granddaughter and live in the smaller house. Trouble is I will probably have to blow or plow the driveways in my eighties, maybe it is easier to just go move into senior housing with the wife and hand them the keys in a few years.

It is so nice to see a house go up and be proud of your labor you put into it. I overbuilt everything, everything is still standing and looks decent except a few siding pieces that ice broke the siding on people's houses. I left extra siding at every job so they could repair it, but vinyl or aluminum siding change color over the years.

They also make that rubberized stuff like winterguard that is used for seams, but it is real sticky and sometimes if the plastic on the back gets loose it sticks together. It does bend around the lip though, which is a plus. I have seen the aluminum flashing with the lip bent onto it that goes over the lap lip too, but those were about sixty cents for a four by twelve piece, I think they come in packs of twenty five and are bought to match the brand of siding.....That sixty cents was fifteen years ago, I think they may be closer to a buck now.
edit on 1-4-2021 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)




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