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There Is One Way Humans Could 'Safely' Enter a Black Hole, Physicists Say

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posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 01:04 PM
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But there's a catch , it can't be just any old Black Hole.

To 'Safely' Enter a Black Hole you must first find a supermassive black hole , but it can't have an accretion disk otherwise the hot gases would frazzle the brave adventurer and that would be the end of that , but if you can find a supermassive black hole without an accretion disk then it's pretty much plain sailing from there ...

The radial size of the event horizon depends on the mass of the respective black hole and is key for a person to survive falling into one. For a black hole with a mass of our Sun (one solar mass), the event horizon will have a radius of just under 2 miles (3.2 kilometres).

The supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy, by contrast, has a mass of roughly 4 million solar masses, and it has an event horizon with a radius of 7.3 million miles or 17 solar radii.

Thus, someone falling into a stellar-size black hole will get much, much closer to the black hole's center before passing the event horizon, as opposed to falling into a supermassive black hole.

This implies, due to the closeness of the black hole's center, that the black hole's pull on a person will differ by a factor of 1,000 billion times between head and toe, depending on which is leading the free fall.

In other words, if the person is falling feet first, as they approach the event horizon of a stellar mass black hole, the gravitational pull on their feet will be exponentially larger compared to the black hole's tug on their head.

The person would experience spaghettification, and most likely not survive being stretched into a long, thin noodle-like shape.

Now, a person falling into a supermassive black hole would reach the event horizon much farther from the the central source of gravitational pull, which means that the difference in gravitational pull between head and toe is nearly zero.

Thus, the person would pass through the event horizon unaffected, not be stretched into a long, thin noodle, survive and float painlessly past the black hole's horizon.
www.sciencealert.com...


Of course as the adventurer could never escape we would never know his fate , but we could tell stories and write songs.


edit on 4-2-2021 by gortex because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: gortex



Of course as the adventurer could never escape we would never know his fate , but we could tell stories and write songs.


Hey, Mr. Spaghetti man, sing a song for me



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 01:19 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: gortex



Of course as the adventurer could never escape we would never know his fate , but we could tell stories and write songs.


Hey, Mr. Spaghetti man, sing a song for me


A truly massive black hole wouldn't spaghettify him. His mass is insignificant compared to the mass of the black hole. Even if it did, it would take an infinite amount of time for it to happen (from his perspective).

The really sucky part would be living inside of a spacesuit for infinity. Worse, can you imagine infinity with no beer???

No thanks!



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Sometimes bigger is better.

Now, a person falling into a supermassive black hole would reach the event horizon much farther from the the central source of gravitational pull, which means that the difference in gravitational pull between head and toe is nearly zero.




posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 01:29 PM
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To bad we can't get to a black hole to throw them in to test their theory.



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: gortex

No more In and Out Burger either way



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 01:33 PM
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Awe cool, you can edit an off topic post that has been removed. Now I will try to recreate the warning box.

 

This is an experiment, it will probably get removed for off topic too, but how will I know unless I try?
 




edit on 4-2-2021 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse


edit on 2/4/2021 by Nivhk because: Off topic.



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Well, I’m game.

Anyone up for a road trip?



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 02:22 PM
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originally posted by: noonebutme
a reply to: gortex

Well, I’m game.

Anyone up for a road trip?


Sorry, the road would get sucked in as well. Go there in a starship with an infinite supply of beer.



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
Of course as the adventurer could never escape we would never know his fate , but we could tell stories and write songs.


Art and music is already doing that.


The music of falling into a black hole



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk

originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: gortex



Of course as the adventurer could never escape we would never know his fate , but we could tell stories and write songs.


Hey, Mr. Spaghetti man, sing a song for me


A truly massive black hole wouldn't spaghettify him. His mass is insignificant compared to the mass of the black hole. Even if it did, it would take an infinite amount of time for it to happen (from his perspective).

The really sucky part would be living inside of a spacesuit for infinity. Worse, can you imagine infinity with no beer???

No thanks!

Well, in light of your "stinky bum, crotch and breath OP" from yesterday...imagine that spacesuit after bein spaghettied!



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 06:06 PM
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I’m still not entirely convinced black holes exist, at least not in the sense physicists seem to think. They’re probably a little more likely than dark matter, and that certainly does not exist. Flaws in the equations and a gargantuan lack of knowledge certainly do exist. We have a lot to learn and very little time left to learn it.



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
To 'Safely' Enter a Black Hole you must first find a supermassive black hole
This thread has the second most stupid title of any ATS I've seen. The first most stupid was the thread saying that scientists discovered light traveling faster than the speed of light. That thread went on for 9 pages before someone who read more than the title commented that the title was wrong. Of course the title is wrong here too, putting quotes around safely doesn't make it correct.

Your source copied someone else's story with a reasonable title, then wrote the stupid title to replace the original title, and you copied the stupid title instead of the title from the original source, which is this:

Could a human enter a black hole to study it?
That's a perfectly fine title on the original source of the story, it's a question asked by Pulkeet, age 12, Bahadurgarh, Haryana, India, which was answered as part of the "Curious Kids" series.

Here's another explanation of the difference between stellar mass and supermassive black holes and how your horrible death will be different in the two cases:

Why you can’t survive falling into a black hole
You will get spaghettified in either a supermassive black hole or a stellar mass black hole, the difference is whether this spaghettification happens at the event horizon or past the event horizon. It turns out not to happen at the event horizon if the black hole is massive enough, but it will still happen.


In contrast to falling into a stellar-mass black hole, your experience plunging into an intermediate-mass or supermassive black hole would be slightly less nightmarish. Although the end result — a horrible death — would still be your fate, you might actually make it all the way through the event horizon and manage to start falling inside the singularity itself while still alive.


Probably the best explanation I've seen of what falling into a black hole would be like is on the youtube Vsauce channel.


originally posted by: ARM1968
I’m still not entirely convinced black holes exist, at least not in the sense physicists seem to think. They’re probably a little more likely than dark matter, and that certainly does not exist. Flaws in the equations and a gargantuan lack of knowledge certainly do exist. We have a lot to learn and very little time left to learn it.
We have models with math that seem to explain black holes up to the event horizon, but inside the event horizon is where our models lose their predictive power to some extent. Even if we had models of what happens inside the event horizon, we can think of no way to verify the models are right by venturing inside a black hole, since a probe sent inside has no way to send the data out that we can think of so far. So we may never know what's inside them for sure.

However we think we have already observed the effects of black holes. If you think it's not a black hole these stars are orbiting, what do you think it is?

www.astro.ucla.edu...

That shows stars orbiting some thing at the center of the Milky Way galaxy, observed since 1995 by the Keck/UCLA Galactic Center Group. If you think it's not a black hole they are orbiting, what are they orbiting? From the stars orbits they have calculated the object must have something like 4 million times the mass of our sun, and as you can see some stars get very close to the object, like star labeled SO-2 which has already made more than one complete orbit. It looks like the star labeled SO-16 got even closer, but it appears to have a longer orbit.


We have a lot to learn and very little time left to learn it.
Are you talking about the world coming to an end in 2012 because of the Mayan calendar? So far we've survived hundreds of doomsday predictions like that, have you got another one? We seems to have made it through the 2012 doomsday prediction unscathed, and many other doomsday predictions too.

edit on 202124 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 08:00 PM
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originally posted by: ARM1968
I’m still not entirely convinced black holes exist, at least not in the sense physicists seem to think. They’re probably a little more likely than dark matter, and that certainly does not exist. Flaws in the equations and a gargantuan lack of knowledge certainly do exist. We have a lot to learn and very little time left to learn it.


I'm pretty sure we're beyond the "theory" point of black holes at this point.

We can now not only see their immense gravitational pull, but when we look across the entire spectrum of light we can see their presence. We even know the process in which they're formed.



posted on Feb, 4 2021 @ 09:24 PM
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You would be spiraling around near the event horizon very close to the speed of light.

en.wikipedia.org...

Theoretically if you had an ion collecting engine powering your craft you might be able to escape.
Mass dust etc collected from just beyond the event horizon would power you faster.
Spiraling back out across the event horizon seems like a possible outcome.
The argument being that the light trapped in the death spiral would not have the velocity boost of your ion engine.
Would have to be just the right size black hole though.

Edit to add: As for the speed of light limit causing an issue I would think the increase mass from feeding inside the event horizon might factor into frame dragging that warps your local space.

Edgar allan Poe probably has the patent from A Descent into the Maelström 1841 LOL.
edit on 4-2-2021 by Slichter because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 5 2021 @ 02:10 AM
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i like to think of the black hole like it’s the hole in the bottom of your toilet where when you flush the sh1t swirls it’s way down. In that regard I have a few ideas of people we should flush, I mean send into the sh1t hole starting with certain world leaders.



posted on Feb, 5 2021 @ 07:04 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Do you want Event Horizon? Because *this* is how you get Event Horizon.


Or there was also that old Disney film Black Hole where they do fall in and it's implied they fall into Hell.



posted on Feb, 5 2021 @ 07:03 PM
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I have no idea at all what they are orbiting and I doubt anyone really does. I accept that mathematical modelling predicts and describes Black Holes. Maths can be twisted to predict Dark Matter and many other things. Truth is we don’t know. Dark Matter is effectively a band aid for our lack of understanding of gravity in effect, gravity on a galaxy sort of scale and beyond. This is because gravity is not really understood and the maths doesn’t really work. Black Holes are, more or less, the ultimate expression of gravity - do you see the dilemma? If we need something to make up 70% of the universes mass that doesn’t exist then the maths is wrong. If it is wrong to such a degree then it is likely wrong about Black Holes too.

That doesn’t mean we aren’t seeing something and those somethings are not acting upon their surroundings, but until we understand gravity far better, then we cannot be sure. a reply to: Arbitrageur



posted on Feb, 6 2021 @ 03:29 AM
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originally posted by: ARM1968
Dark Matter is effectively a band aid for our lack of understanding of gravity in effect, gravity on a galaxy sort of scale and beyond. This is because gravity is not really understood and the maths doesn’t really work. Black Holes are, more or less, the ultimate expression of gravity - do you see the dilemma? [/post]
No, I do not see the dilemma and I'll explain why I think your reasoning is flawed.

You say "gravity is not really understood".
I can agree that gravity is not completely understood.

Where our logic parts ways is that you then say "the maths doesn’t really work" This I completely disagree with.

Our gravitational model works so precisely in our solar system that we were able to use the model to find dark matter in our solar system. We noticed an apparent gravitational anomaly, and searched for the cause, and we found the cause in the form of baryonic dark matter called a massive compact halo object, or MACHO.

discovery of Neptune by its gravitational effect on Uranus -- unseen matter

-wobbling of Uranus's orbit led to search for unseen body

-Neptune discovered as a result, the only planet detected first by its gravitational effect on another planet

-early unseen mass (or ``dark matter'') problem that lead to actual detection
So this is a demonstration that dark matter predicted by our gravitational model was actually found, so it sure looks to me like the math really does work.

Neptune was in our own solar system and we didn't even know about it. It was hard to see and we didn't find it until the wobble of Uranus told us where to look. The rest of the galaxy and universe is much, much further away than Neptune so we can't see objects like Neptune that are much further away, even with our best telescopes. However we have reason to believe that MACHOs like Neptune can't account for all the dark matter so it's probably more than one thing. I posted a chart of many possibilities in a previous post.


I have no idea at all what they are orbiting and I doubt anyone really does.
Using the same model that helped us discover Neptune, it's a very massive object in a tiny space. You may not have any idea what that means, but other people do know that our models have been confirmed making useful predictions, and they describe that much mass in that small amount of space as a black hole. The math should work for those stellar orbits around the galactic center, I don't see any reason why it wouldn't.

Regarding what exactly is inside the black hole, I would say nobody knows exactly what form the mass takes inside the black hole, that's where our math has problems, inside a black hole.

Regarding the MOND claim that there is no dark matter, here is another problem with the MOND model, it can't explain maps like these, of where the dark matter is located:

Unprecedentedly wide and sharp dark matter map


Figure 4: An example of 3D distribution of dark matter reconstructed via tomographic methods using the weak lensing technique combined with the redshift estimates of the background galaxies.
Again here, the maths work since the same maths that can explain galaxy rotation curves can also explain gravitational lensing, something that modified gravity theories can't do.




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