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Simple Question...maybe

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posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Don't know about Constitutional argument, but "never crap on your own doorstep" springs to mind.

And that applies to other people as well.

Any idea as to why someone would do something like that?

It's not a nice thing to do to anyone, and rather childish at that.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: Ahabstar

Okay, that's a valid point. Let me rephrase...

If I make an argument that the US Constitution gives me the right to dookie on someone's front step because there is nothing in the Constitution preventing me from doing so, then regardless of any state law I have permission???

I'm not being obtuse here, honest!

Now we're getting down to the crux of the argument.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Ahhhhh, but just wait!!

Stay tuned.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

The Founders held property rights to be as important as other human rights. In fact, at times they insisted that the right to acquire and possess private property was in some ways the most important of individual rights.


The second reason that property rights were viewed as primary was that they served as a practical guarantee for other rights. In effect, not only were property rights the most vulnerable, they were also the first line of defense for the other rights. According to the Founders, property was not only a right in itself, but also a means to the preservation of other rights. Economic freedom was understood to serve the other personal freedoms in two ways. First, property meant practical power. An economically independent people were best able to maintain their political independence. Indeed, the ownership of property was of immense importance to the practical independence not only of the people as a whole, but also of the individual citizen. As Edmund Morgan wrote in The Birth of the Republic, the “widespread ownership of property is perhaps the most important single fact about Americans of the Revolutionary period. . . . Standing on his own land with spade in hand and flintlock not far off, the American could look at his richest neighbor and laugh.”


Decent article here about it...

The Primacy of Property Rights and the American Founding

So no... nowhere in the Constitution or Bill of Rights are you going to find "trespassing" as a right.

Only in the 14th Amendment are you going to find even a reference of TAXING said property.

That was given to the states.




posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

That's what i would be saying to them mate.

After tying them up and getting them down the basement.

Then i suggest leaving them there in complete darkness for a few days to contiplate their choice of dumping ground.

After all it's nice to be nice.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Excellent point (as always).

Now, how does this extrapolate to public property? Property which is owned collectively by the taxpayers?



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:11 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: Lumenari

Excellent point (as always).

Now, how does this extrapolate to public property? Property which is owned collectively by the taxpayers?



It does not, since regulations for publicly owned land are held by the trustees of said land, be it Federal or State.

Which TECHNICALLY means the taxpayers or voters are in control of such laws.

In reality, that is far from the truth.



edit on 20-12-2020 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Buy an Ip camera and record it. Post a sign.

Then Upload it to Youtube,Facebook or Twitter, and let people laugh at them.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:27 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

In that case you can do so under the 10th Amendment because taking a dump in someone’s yard is not an enumerated Federal Right (and therefore cannot be shared with the State) nor is it a State’s Exclusive Right because the Equal Protection Clause applied to the Fourth Amendment protections allowing you to be secure in your home. Meaning that the State cannot abridge enumerated Individual Rights.

So the right to defecate is the Right of an Individual which does not have to be enumerated in order to be upheld. See also legal justification for abortion.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Which is precisely why I avoided the State and Federal law questions initially. You've effectively presented my case before I even said what it was (dang it). Very astute (again, as usual).

Enough enigma...

So, as I'm sure you maybe saw today, we have a debate going about the City of Seattle and the current state of disrepair it is in. There are legions of lawless drug addicts defecating in the streets, stray needles in the streets, vagrants everywhere and general lawlessness. One of the principle arguments has been that the US Constitution doesn't prohibit this, so therefore it's legal. I take strong exception to this. The retort is that States like Washington are unwilling to pass / enforce laws which prohibit such behavior.

IMHO, it seems that "The People" are entitled to common decency among citizens and that there are basic tenets of reasonable law implied by the Constitution. If complete anarchy is allowed to prevail simply because it is not restrained by the Constitution then there is no hope for the future.


edit on 12/20/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:33 PM
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Pretty sure the constitution gives you the right to shoot anyone taking a dump on your doorstep... I’m no expert though.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: Ahabstar

Are you sure you didn't mean the 9th Amendment?

If so, wouldn't the reverse also apply? I am, as a citizen, allowed basic rights which are not enumerated?

I'm pretty sure everyone could agree not having someone dumping on their lawn is pretty basic right, right?


edit on 12/20/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:35 PM
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originally posted by: Subaeruginosa
Pretty sure the constitution gives you the right to shoot anyone taking a dump on your doorstep... I’m no expert though.


The only crime listed and defined in the Constitution is Treason.




posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Sadly, not even that seems to be being enforced these days!!

Off-topic though, sorry.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:37 PM
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Daily DBL


edit on 12/20/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

9 & 10 are fairly interwoven as both deal in individual rights.

Now, common decency and health hazards fall under local, state and federal regulation accordingly. You as an individual are fairly limited to force enforcement out of any of those agencies unless their failure directly impacts you. I, in Ohio, would never have cholera from people in Portland or Seattle crapping on the street. Different story if I was visiting...but it won’t hurt me otherwise.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

...Bribery, and a whole slew of them in the Bill of Rights and other Amendments. Like blocking voting, alcohol and then lifting the ban on alcohol, legalized an illegal tax scheme, violation of the bicameral legislation, creating a state out of another state illegally...bunch of stuff in there.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

So many wise-asses on this board. Everyone comes on with NOT an answer to your question- ignoring your multiple statements that you aren’t asking about local or state laws, and gives some either wise crack OR some know-it-all answer but not pertinent to the posed question. Holy hell. I’m not on my period but reading the responses in this thread sure makes me feel like I am.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:58 PM
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I would put it back where it came from

... now I am wondering what kind of charges I would get for doing that

Also if they made u put it back if cought deficating outside a bathroom I bet the risk of having to put it back would stop most everyone even the most reluctant to stop would after the first time it had to be put back

Part of this problem is states should build more public restrooms its alot cheaper than cleaning it up off the street



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 06:05 PM
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What kind of piece of sh!t, would "dookie in" someone's yard?




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