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How, Functionally, Does Covid Differ From the Common Cold?

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posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 04:18 AM
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originally posted by: markovian

originally posted by: dug88
a reply to: 1947boomer

Every year we have 'novel viruses'. That's why every year, you can get the cold or the flu again, despite getting it the year before. Every year we face strains of novel coronaviruses and other viruses. If we didn't, we'd get the cold and the flu once in our lives and never again. Every year's strains of cold and flu are novel and new mutations from last year's or some other strain. This has been an ongoing thing for a long time.


You retain some immunity to the next strain over time u lose immunity in 2 ways

The virus mutates enough so immunity is reduced

Your immune system loses its ability to produce antibodies the longer its been since you have been exposed to the virus


There is no such thing as a virus its a crock of #.
It Pleomorphic Bacteria existing in viral size going viral places doing viral things.but still a living bacteria.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 06:42 AM
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a reply to: dug88


Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a new strain of coronavirus not previously seen in humans that is spreading quickly worldwide. Four other strains of coronavirus are actually very common and usually only cause mild symptoms (like the common cold).  However, some strains, like COVID-19, can cause severe illness in certain groups. For example, older people and people of all ages with severe underlying health conditions — like heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes, for example — seem to be at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness. There’s currently no cure or vaccine for COVID-19. 

Symptoms of COVID-19 can include:

Fever and/or chills

Cough (usually dry)

Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Tiredness (sometimes)

Aches and pains (sometimes)

Headaches (sometimes)

Sore throat (sometimes)

*Upper respiratory symptoms, like runny nose and sinus congestion, are very uncommon in COVID-19.

The severity of COVID-19 symptoms ranges from mild to severe. 






From Inter Intermountain Healthcare



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 06:54 AM
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originally posted by: one4all

originally posted by: markovian

originally posted by: dug88
a reply to: 1947boomer

Every year we have 'novel viruses'. That's why every year, you can get the cold or the flu again, despite getting it the year before. Every year we face strains of novel coronaviruses and other viruses. If we didn't, we'd get the cold and the flu once in our lives and never again. Every year's strains of cold and flu are novel and new mutations from last year's or some other strain. This has been an ongoing thing for a long time.


You retain some immunity to the next strain over time u lose immunity in 2 ways

The virus mutates enough so immunity is reduced

Your immune system loses its ability to produce antibodies the longer its been since you have been exposed to the virus


There is no such thing as a virus its a crock of #.
It Pleomorphic Bacteria existing in viral size going viral places doing viral things.but still a living bacteria.


That's a new one. Why arent the experts talking about this then?



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 07:50 AM
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Covid is NOVEL was the argument used many a posters here to draw a distinction when points like this are raised. How that’s a stopping point in a conversation idk... but they all heard it from the boob tube so they parrot away.

a reply to: dug88



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 09:36 AM
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Same genus. Like Staph that causes Boils and MRSA. Same genus, wholly different level of pathogenicity.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 09:47 AM
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originally posted by: Rob808
Covid is NOVEL was the argument used many a posters here to draw a distinction when points like this are raised. How that’s a stopping point in a conversation idk... but they all heard it from the boob tube so they parrot away.

a reply to: dug88



The danger with novel is that it means the immune system can over-react causing as many if not more problems than the disease itself. The problem with that line of argument is that the people in the population with the strongest immune systems are then the most at risk or at least as much at risk as those with the weakest immune systems because they're the ones whose immune systems will be the most prone to killing them through intense reaction.

We aren't seeing that in COVID. The youngest and healthiest are not the ones dropping over dead in the streets. The numbers don't support it. It's the oldest and weakest with the most compromised immune systems or those whose bodies are already weakened by other health problems who are most at risk of death just like in any illness.

None of that means COVID isn't novel, but it does mean that it's not producing the severe immune reactions that were feared in the numbers they thought it would.
edit on 20-12-2020 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 10:03 AM
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Functionally, COVID infects different cells using different surface cell proteins.

Rhinoviruses (common cold) tend to go after ICAM-1 and CDHR3 which I believe are primarily in the lungs

COVID (coronavirus, some SARS?) goes after ACE2 receptors which are much more wide-range - found in the lungs, heart/arteries, kidneys and intestines. It can cause other problems besides lung infections, but those are the primary 'targets'.

Interestingly, ACE2 is supposedly tied to hormonal cascades from puberty and doesn't show itself in young children nearly as much as teens and adults. A child can have a relatively large amount of COVID in their system but it doesn't have much to latch on to.

As I recall COVID tends to pool in the deeper parts of the lungs and generate more fluid/mucus at the base which can lead to secondary pulmonary infections and require assisted breathing procedures.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: djz3ro

originally posted by: one4all

originally posted by: markovian

originally posted by: dug88
a reply to: 1947boomer

Every year we have 'novel viruses'. That's why every year, you can get the cold or the flu again, despite getting it the year before. Every year we face strains of novel coronaviruses and other viruses. If we didn't, we'd get the cold and the flu once in our lives and never again. Every year's strains of cold and flu are novel and new mutations from last year's or some other strain. This has been an ongoing thing for a long time.


You retain some immunity to the next strain over time u lose immunity in 2 ways

The virus mutates enough so immunity is reduced

Your immune system loses its ability to produce antibodies the longer its been since you have been exposed to the virus


There is no such thing as a virus its a crock of #.
It Pleomorphic Bacteria existing in viral size going viral places doing viral things.but still a living bacteria.


That's a new one. Why arent the experts talking about this then?


Good question.Why arent you asking them.....Im just another Nutter burning up my Candle here on ATS.
edit on 20-12-2020 by one4all because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 05:58 PM
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originally posted by: Teikiatsu
Interestingly, ACE2 is supposedly tied to hormonal cascades from puberty and doesn't show itself in young children nearly as much as teens and adults. A child can have a relatively large amount of COVID in their system but it doesn't have much to latch on to.


Could that hormonal connection also be a factor for older people who have a lot less hormonal activity?
Assuming an otherwise healthy older adult.

A different angle for ACE2
How ACE2 Influences COVID-19 Severity in Older Adults



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 06:44 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: KansasGirl




the majority of people who get it don’t even know they have it except they tested positive.

Yes. But there are enough who do know they have it, and have it bad enough to be hospitalized, that it's causing problems in a lot of places.

How do you suppose they got infected?


I suppose they got infected the same exact ways that people get infected with the flu and the common cold.

These people who are badly ill in the hospital, you say...how many of them are there strictly due to infection from covid-19? What does that number compare with the overall number of people infected? And how does THAT number compare with the flu?

I look forward to those specific stats. And again I wish you well in your very passionate pursuit of safety.



posted on Dec, 20 2020 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl


I look forward to those specific stats.
As with any large database, specifics can be elusive but here is a source which shows the average total occupancy rate to be about 65% for the past decade or so.
www.statista.com...

There was a short lived occupancy problem in January of 2018, due to influenza, but it did not approach what is happening now. Nor did the COVID peaks earlier this year.

As to COVID specific hospitalizations and their impact, there is this:
carlsonschool.umn.edu...


Data source is here:

This time series data will update weekly, going back to August 1, 2020. These datasets will enable academics, data scientists, and all Americans to see how COVID-19 cases are impacting individual hospitals and local regions. Information is available to any and everyone who wishes to explore or analyze the information at the facility, county, metropolitan, and regional level:

www.hhs.gov...


edit on 12/20/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 12/20/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2020 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: dug88

I was thinking that maybe this bug had some kind of aerosol nerve agent that it was delivered with. By chemtrail. That might explain the loss of taste and smell.



posted on Dec, 22 2020 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: elementalgrove

My pet peeve.

Took the kid to a children’s museum. All the interactive exhibits were open. Good.

Everyone had to wear masks, and wear them snug against their mouth and nose.

So you had kids and adults constantly touching their masks to adjust them. Touch the exhibit, or touch a screen, then go back to adjusting their masks as they slip down.


So stupid. PPE only works if properly used, worn, removed, and disposed of.
edit on 22-12-2020 by neutronflux because: Added



posted on Dec, 22 2020 @ 11:09 AM
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a reply to: dug88

I want Coronavirus for Christmas. Only Coronavirus will do. I don't want the Flu, I don't want Pertussis. The only thing I want is Coronaviruseses. And Coronavirusses want me, too.



posted on Dec, 22 2020 @ 06:09 PM
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originally posted by: Dutchowl
a reply to: dug88

I want Coronavirus for Christmas. Only Coronavirus will do. I don't want the Flu, I don't want Pertussis. The only thing I want is Coronaviruseses. And Coronavirusses want me, too.
Good luck, I’ve been trying to get this virus since March. No luck as of yet.



posted on Dec, 22 2020 @ 06:09 PM
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originally posted by: Dutchowl
a reply to: dug88

I want Coronavirus for Christmas. Only Coronavirus will do. I don't want the Flu, I don't want Pertussis. The only thing I want is Coronaviruseses. And Coronavirusses want me, too.
Good luck, I’ve been trying to get this virus since March. No luck as of yet.




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