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Nasa to Develop Deep Space Corridors

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posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 08:34 PM
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You heard it here first, ATS! Well, at least, ATS is the first that i'm telling this info. It seems that with the Gateway project underway Nasa needs a transport network to and from the Gateway station.The article doesn't clarify, for me, whether or not if the transport network will be from the Earth to the Gateway, from the Gateway to Mars, or both.

Anyway, check it out!



NASA is gearing up to establish the first permanent colony on the moon as a transshipment point for even further missions to Mars, and it needs a reliable delivery system to shuttle supplies back and forth.

On Thursday, Mark Wiese, manager of deep space logistics for NASA's Gateway program, solicited logistics and freight technology companies to collaborate in the development of a next-generation supply chain that can overcome the challenges of distance, zero gravity, isolation and extreme conditions.

"We want to partner with you in developing existing capabilities on Earth and translating them to the logistics supply chain beyond our atmosphere," Wiese said in a keynote address to SpaceWaves, a first-of-its-kind conference from FreightWaves that explores opportunities in the space logistics market. "NASA can't do it alone. There are opportunities for investment, innovation and growth far beyond the boundaries of this pale blue dot we call home."

And new advances eventually could be applied to enhance freight transportation on Earth, Wiese said, speculating on the possibility of electric trucks that can recharge on the fly or cargo that can deliver itself.

Automation and new types of packaging are key areas of interest for NASA, but any logistics system will have to be durable and adaptive enough to withstand being bombarded by radiation, which induces rapid changes in temperature that impact vulnerable payloads, and avoid fast-moving debris.

Automation is critical because the distance makes real-time communication and remote control of vehicles unworkable. The lag time for signals to reach the moon is 2.5 seconds, and it's 40 minutes to Mars, Wiese told the virtual audience.

"That means we'll need autonomous systems capable of making decisions for themselves. And batteries that last longer, charge faster and weigh less," he said, "with interactivity between robots that has never before been accomplished in space."


Pretty cool news, huh? So, what says ATS? It looks like the Gateway is really happening! What says ATS?

www.benzinga.com...



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 08:47 PM
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Do it.....do it
I'm in
Seriously cool, I'll definitely read more.
Thanks for sharing.

Expanding is a much better idea than sterilizing everyone with perv gates' vaccines.



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

Yes, I expect a lot of new advancements to be developed by NASA; advancements that eventually make it to the private sector. There's talk of boosting up AI technologies since there will be robots handling a lot of the work, new communication systems to be developed due to the vast distances/ time delays of Space, and the development of a next-generation supply chain that can overcome the challenges of distance, zero gravity, isolation and extreme conditions.
edit on 3-12-2020 by lostbook because: paragraph edit



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Here is the Gateway info link in the Research library:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Nice to see positive movement and timelines being mentioned!!

Here is another thing to think about as we head out to the stars: how will communication work?

www.quantamagazine.org...

We get equipment up, have a way to communicate, and a staging area...


Space...
The Final Frontier...





posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 09:11 PM
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BEam me up Scotty.



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Very cool. I hope to see some progress within my lifetime.



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 09:44 PM
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Nice OP. Cool stuff Thank you



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 10:01 PM
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He got the lag time for moon signals wrong. One way signal only takes about 1.25 seconds. I assume he meant for two way communication or remote control.

Anyway, I am all for them to set up a moon base. It makes more sense to build ships purely for space on the moon that are meant to ferry things back and forth through space. If they can extract and refine materials on the moon it would be much better. Setup would cost a lot but would pay itself off once it was up and running.
edit on 3-12-2020 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 10:57 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Logistics....e.g. including delivery, movers, and junk removers....on the Moon and on Mars....


I get it !

Now, just can't wait for it:

Sanford and Son in Spaaaacccceeeee...



...always liked that jingle...

edit on 3-12-2020 by M5xaz because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 11:25 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
a reply to: lostbook

Very cool. I hope to see some progress within my lifetime.


Me too. The technology(ies) developed will benefit socitey for years to come..! Just like that of developments from the Apollo era
edit on 3-12-2020 by lostbook because: paragraph edit



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 11:53 PM
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originally posted by: M5xaz
a reply to: lostbook

Logistics....e.g. including delivery, movers, and junk removers....on the Moon and on Mars....


I get it !

Now, just can't wait for it:

Sanford and Son in Spaaaacccceeeee...



...always liked that jingle...


I'm coming to join you Elizabeth...

So the Moon is gonna become some cosmic shipping yard, in 20 years there will be shipping containers everywhere with graffiti all over them.

Seriously though I think it's well past the time we have a moon base and a moon orbital station too. It's got to be the first step to a Mars base. Hell sometimes I think I'd go even if I could never come back, it would be so fascinating.



posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 12:01 AM
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originally posted by: M5xaz
...always liked that jingle...


Quincy is The Man!




posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 06:30 AM
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I hate to rain on your parade, but this has to be done in the private sector or it will never happen. NASA is at the whim of the US Government. Their direction changes like the weather with each administration. The Dim’s will spend the budget on social services and dump the funding for hard science.

Just history repeating its self. That happens if you refuse to study it.



posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 06:57 AM
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Wondering if they're considering setting up any presence at Earth's Lagrange points.

Probably not feasible to keep people in such locations indefinitely, but they'd make a very convenient place to park supplies, fuel or communication relays for any missions traveling outside of Earth's vicinity.



posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: SleeperHasAwakened

Never knew that thanks for the info,

Ive always been fascinated by the concept of a space elevator to avoid the cost of escaping gravity and lift capabilities. Can't even remember the sci-fi book I read about a space elevator, but the concept stuck in my mind.

Here's an article from MIT on a new angle to the old space elevator approach. Instead of anchoring it to the earth, where we have yet to develop strong enough materials to handle the forces generated. They propose anchoring to the moon and it mentions these critical Lagrange points.

“If you drop a tool from the International Space Station it will seem to rapidly accelerate away from you,” point out Penoyre and Sandford. “The Lagrange point has an almost negligible gradient in gravitational force; the dropped tool will stay close at hand for a much longer period.”

Neither is there any significant debris in this region. “The Lagrange point has been mostly untouched by previous missions, and orbits passing through here are chaotic, greatly reducing the amount of meteoroids,” they say.

For these reasons, Penoyre and Sandford say access to the Lagrange point is major advantage of the spaceline. “The Lagrange point base camp is the thing we believe to be most important and influential for the early use of the spaceline (and for human space exploration in general),” they say. “Such a base camp would allow construction and maintenance of a new generation of space-based experiments—one could imagine telescopes, particle accelerators, gravitational wave detectors, vivariums, power generation and launch points for missions to the rest of the solar system.”

That’s interesting work that invites a renewed focus on the idea of a space elevator. Cheap access to the Lagrange point, the moon, and points beyond may just have become considerably cheaper and more likely.

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1908.09339 : The Spaceline: A Practical Space Elevator Alternative Achievable With Current Technology



posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: putnam6

Yes, the idea of space elevators and tethers are very prominent in sci-fi novels. There's actually been a good deal of scientific research into developing them as a technology for carrying freight into low-Earth orbit. Not sure about how the research is progressing lately, but last I looked into it, we were not very close to putting it to use.

There was an interesting Coast2Coast episode where Art interviewed a scientist who explained the concept of space elevators, how they worked, and what the challenges are to moving from the research phase into trial and eventually production use.




posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: SleeperHasAwakened

The problem they have with an elevator is making a material strong enough to build it. I think they found one that would work but can only make tiny amounts of it in a lab. They could probably build a sky hook with what we have on hand now. It would require lots of investment and design for the vehicles as well as the hook itself. We could make a loop that is held in space by electricity but the project cost would be in the trillions.



posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Correct; there are no materials we know of that have a tensile strength sufficient to form a cable that extends hundreds of kilometers in length. IIUC they have tried everything from exotic alloys to carbon nano structures, and even derivatives of spider silk.



posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 09:12 PM
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Moon tether
www.smithsonianmag.com...
Wonderful article and links, thank you. I look forward to elaboration of the rotating skyhook strategy which could be used from low lunar orbit to emplace small packets onto [and off of] the lunar surface within 10-20 years. Kevlar is strong enough, tether mass would be on the order of only a hundred times delivery mass, length about 100 to 200 km. . Might be a candidate for a future X-prize.



posted on Dec, 4 2020 @ 09:15 PM
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Earth-Moon to Mars and back routes have been studied for a long time, here's a report by Buzz Aldrin and me from twenty years ago:

March 2000 - Scientific American, “A Bus Between The Planets [Mars Cycler Station]”, w/ Buzz Aldrin: www.jamesoberg.com...



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