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Another Mars UFO

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posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 12:58 AM
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Interesting segmentation. Could be a compression artifact, I guess. Meteorite, maybe. Probably not a gamma ray strike.

edit on 3-11-2020 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 01:08 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

What camera is the image from and whats the image number? Or what page is it on?
Theres thousands of images at the link

The image you posted looks like an artifact
edit on 3/11/20 by SecretKnowledge because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 01:13 AM
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originally posted by: SecretKnowledge
a reply to: Blue Shift

What camera is the image from and whats the image number? Or what page is it on?
Theres thousands of images at the link

The image you posted looks like an artifact

Here is a link
mars.nasa.gov...



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Thanks
Here's the image, looks like a rip in the space time continuim



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 01:21 AM
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originally posted by: SecretKnowledge
a reply to: Blue Shift

Thanks
Here's the image, looks like a rip in the space time continuim

Looks like a bracelet with a heart charm in the middle. Here's the UFO from a few years back. It's in some old thread. Also segmented.


edit on 3-11-2020 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 01:31 AM
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If this is some type of craft, it most closely resembles SCRAM/RAM Jet or Nuclear Pulse propulsion technology.



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 05:03 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Starlink for the Mars colony.



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 11:14 AM
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Depending of course on which direction the nav cam is looking, the time and date of the image would put phobos roughly where that object is.



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 11:16 AM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
Depending of course on which direction the nav cam is looking, the time and date of the image would put phobos roughly where that object is.


A long exposure would give Phobos or Deimos a trail like that for sure.

Or it is another one of Space Forces ships taking off...



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 11:51 AM
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Martians are doing cem Trails defintly how the earth Humans got the idea .



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 12:46 PM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
Depending of course on which direction the nav cam is looking, the time and date of the image would put phobos roughly where that object is.

It would also be nice if they had the Left Nav Cam image available, but a while back they stopped uploading those for some reason. Camera malfunction, saving bandwidth, who knows?

Anyway, there's nothing like it on the image taken 13 seconds before this one. Could Phobos zoom into the frame that fast without registering?

Also, if it was a simple time lapse, why isn't it more regular? Phobos' period of rotation is 7.66 hours. It wouldn't be rotating fast enough to produce the segmentation seen in the image. It would show as a more uniform streak.

I still think maybe a spinning meteorite. Probably not a spaceship. Probably.
edit on 3-11-2020 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: abeverage

originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
Depending of course on which direction the nav cam is looking, the time and date of the image would put phobos roughly where that object is.


A long exposure would give Phobos or Deimos a trail like that for sure.

Or it is another one of Space Forces ships taking off...


That's what it looks like to me, a long exposure... not space force, but could be mundane..



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 05:33 PM
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originally posted by: midnightstar
Martians are doing cem Trails defintly how the earth Humans got the idea .

They could actually use a little global warming.



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 06:14 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Probably not a gamma ray strike.

Why?



posted on Nov, 3 2020 @ 09:12 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

That’s Mars starlink musk is getting a head start...
Or providing better internet for those already secretly there...

It’s most likely a body that was broken up by the Sun or a planet somewhere along its travels...
edit on 3-11-2020 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Nov, 4 2020 @ 12:54 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I'm not saying it is Phobos, just offering it up as a possible. It is an irregular shape so might not catch the sun in the same way as a sphere?



posted on Nov, 4 2020 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: Blue Shift
Probably not a gamma ray strike.

Why?

I've looked at dozens or maybe hundreds of gamma ray strikes over the past many years. They're usually just little specks or splatters, not long, structured features. This one is noticeably different. I'll find you some typical examples. They happen all the time. However, if you can find one that is similar, I'll expand my impressions to include those kinds, also.

Here's one:


Here's a couple I made .gifs for:



Here's one creating a black splat:


Here's a meteorite:

edit on 4-11-2020 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2020 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
a reply to: Blue Shift

I'm not saying it is Phobos, just offering it up as a possible. It is an irregular shape so might not catch the sun in the same way as a sphere?

Oh, sure. Curiosity occasionally takes pictures of it, and it's mostly spherical. But if it's a long exposure, unless the albedo changes in some way (like it's rotating), then the streak will likely be uniform and not bumpy or segmented.



posted on Nov, 4 2020 @ 06:18 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I'm sure you have, even I have seen a few.

What I think is that the length of a gamma ray strike depends on several things, mostly the direction of travel of the ray when it hits the sensor. A head-on strike would leave just a point, a completely parallel strike would leave a long trace, with all the possibilities in between.



posted on Nov, 4 2020 @ 07:50 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP
a reply to: Blue Shift

I'm sure you have, even I have seen a few.

What I think is that the length of a gamma ray strike depends on several things, mostly the direction of travel of the ray when it hits the sensor. A head-on strike would leave just a point, a completely parallel strike would leave a long trace, with all the possibilities in between.

Fine. Show me an example.
edit on 4-11-2020 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



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