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Expanding Crack in the Moon's Surface.

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posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 01:04 PM
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To add to the recent revelation of water on the Moon, this article reports that a crack in the moon's surface, discovered by scientists, is "continuously expanding"...

Buzzfeed Article

It's not much of a read but I am sure that this is nothing new, so why should scientists be baffled and why is this not deemed as newsworthy as the "discovery" of water? On a more serious note, if the Moon is still settling and the Earth itself is exerting a gravitational massage effect, could this eventually destroy the delicate balancing act between the two celestial bodies and have a devastating consequence for life on Earth?

Space.com

Like others, I get the impression the Moon is slowly being dragged back onto the radar of public attention.



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 01:10 PM
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I'll bet the Jovian moons get hit with a lot of gravitational pull. Wonder if they crack as well.

Cheers



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 01:16 PM
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So the full moon has a crack in it?



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: fromtheskydown

"Scientists" in articles like this are always "baffled". I once had an editor who expressly said that when you were writing low research fluff articles, always use the plural "scientists" and if it was something you weren't going to research (i.e. you're just reporting the moon has a crack in it, not why or how or when, etc.) to say that the "scientists" were "baffled". It was a way to circumvent the fact that you just fluffed a headline (to an average reader skimming articles like this), but it was also the least disrespectful word to use when you knew you were talking s%^$ about "scientists" because it doesn't actually have a strong meaning.



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: fromtheskydown

The cracks are caused because the Moon is shrinking.






posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Yep, agree with this. It's just lazy clickbait typical of that site. Look at the number of 'legitimate interest' cookies they'd like to set.

Scientists aren't in the least bit baffled, in fact there are plausible explanations within the article itself, but "Good explanations for observed reality" headlines don't sell copy.
edit on 27/10/2020 by OneBigMonkeyToo because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 02:12 PM
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posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 03:11 PM
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The article did read as shallow clickbait, it came up in my feed on Facebook, which I found a bit strange...I don't follow Buzzfeed or Science.com...and is why I considered that for some reason, the Moon is having its profile raised in the public consciousness. It was a serious question though, that if the Moon is still undergoing turbulence and disturbances and even shrinkage, as Goretex points out, is this going to spell disaster for our planet at some point in the future?

I'll go into full ATS 'conspiracy' mode here and speculate the machine that really is the Moon is firing up and shedding its skin!




posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: fromtheskydown

When I was involved with a NASA contract mapping Apollo Lunar Landing sites using satellite imagery with high powered optics , as well other types of maps for NASA, it was quite common to see thrust fault scarps, as well as long rilles.


edit on 27-10-2020 by lunarcartographer because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-10-2020 by lunarcartographer because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-10-2020 by lunarcartographer because: (no reason given)


(post by panoz77 removed for political trolling and baiting)

posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Indeed. Science journalism has always sucked. But it's hard to get the average reader to peruse even a small white paper, let alone sifting through observational data, coordinate tables, and a bunch of other crap relating to what might be a geological feature on the moon's surface. It's just too laborious.

Often, "science writers" will fill in the blanks on things they don't understand just to push the piece out. This tends to be the reason for the huge amount of scientific misinformation. Tidbits of which I'm sure we've all been exposed to and may even erroneously believe to be factual.


edit on 10 27 2020 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: gortex

To add, their is also the geological features rills and rilles:

"A rille is a long and narrow valley on the Moon and appears to have been formed by subsidence or collapse of surface materials along a crustal fracture (Baldwin 1968), which could be ascribed to the thermal and mechanical erosion, construction, and volatiles between the basement surface and a surficial permafrost layer (Cameron 1964, Quaide 1965). Since the first study with Apollo and Lunar Orbiter during the 1960s and 1970s, Luna Missions Stooke, P. the lunar sinuous rilles were considered as an enigmatic feature. Rilles attract much more scientific interest, because the rilles are related to the discovery of linear negative relief features on the Moon (Cruikshank and Wood 1972). The studies of rilles could help us to better understand the lunar geological processes and the origin of geomorphological features on the Moon (Hurwitz et al. 2013)."

"Similar to the lunar rilles, the rills are described as longer and thinner valley areas on the moon, spread on the highlands and lunar mare (Mcgill 1971). There were several types, based on their morphological characteristics and locations, including the following ways:

Arya Brandeis, with the length of 230 km and width of 0–5 km, being the bridge of Mare Imbrium and bay of Oceanus Procellarum; Beh Theo Duus, with the length of 280 km and the width of 0–5 km, located on the surface of southern Mare Nubium; Ibale, with the length of 200 km and the width of 0–5 km, located between Mare Humorum and Mare Nubium; Heekin Noons, with the length of 200 km and the width of 0–5 km, located on the surface between Mare Vaporum and Sinus Medii; Hypa, with the tiny length and width, located in southern Mare Tranquillitatis; Planck; with the length of 350 km and the width of 10–20 km, ....etc"

link.springer.com...

.




edit on 27-10-2020 by lunarcartographer because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: fromtheskydown




Like others, I get the impression the Moon is slowly being dragged back onto the radar of public attention.


They want the funding to go back. There's an international agreement right now to send astronauts back to the moon with a specific mission in mind; the initial steps to colonization and exploitation of lunar resources both for commercial and government use.

The initiatives being proposed absolutely must be done internationally because even the United States cannot bear the brunt of those costs alone. Especially in the interim period between setting up a colony and the establishment of self-sufficient operations.

We are going back to the moon and I think in a really big way.

I'm excited for my kids.



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

Did anyone notice the NASA logo clothing trends last year? A great way to work your way into the Gen Z crew is to Nasa x Champion your way there.



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Yep. They're building up public sentiment on purpose. I can't say that I'm not sold. I think the endeavor is a must for the survival of our species long-term. The truth is that in order to make something that big happen and justify the expenditure you have to make it popular. You have to sell the idea in every way possible and the government does hire marketing experts.



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 05:20 PM
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Maybe? I mean it is 2020.




posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 05:54 PM
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a reply to: fromtheskydown

Something something young Earth?



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Or maybe alien scientists caused it

www.youtube.com...



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 07:35 PM
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So something I've been thinking about since this announcement: does anyone think it's a bad idea to mine the moon? I mean the moons orbit is already expanding. What happens when we get up there, start mining the place and bringing all those tons of material(s) back to earth? I know no more tides etc., but it sounds like an absolutely bad idea to me. Mine it and keep it there? Sure, but any removal/displacement of material should be a "no go."
edit on 10/27/20 by surfinguru because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2020 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: fromtheskydown

Well that is that . Hunter Biden Can Never be an Astronaut .







 
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