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can I transfer my mobile phone number into a physical landline??

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posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 02:47 AM
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Certainly a strange topic of discussion. I used to go through half a dozen numbers a year. Phone service is just not an essential service for me and so i frequently let it lapse because I dont even like the phone number itself. Usually just for the convinience of not carrying a powered sim card everywhere. I'm not really going to explain the why much more, it is irrelevant.

My only real concern is I finally found a cool super easy to remember number and I dont really want to lose the simpliciry of it. Everyone I have said it to remember it. Its only 3 dufferent numbers and four of the digits are the same number.

So i have still been tryi g to get a landline but ATT stopped offering that service this year. I know you can still get one because the infrastructure is still there and being managed. And several business owners i speak with tell me insurance will not cover their property unless they have an alarm system that is hard wired.

So number one, where the hell can i find landline service in hillsborough county florida.
And number two, is it possible to transfer an existing mobile number to a physical landline??



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

These?

www.wirefly.com...

I see what you mean, finding landline service in Florida in general seems not so easy.

As to the second question...

www.quora.com...

Maybe?



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 03:39 AM
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a reply to: dug88
Well the second link answers question two. Now I have been to several different phone stores, they just respond like I asked them if i can kick their grandmother in the nuts. Its like if they are trying to solve complex algebra at the mere trying to understand the mere thought of someone wanting a more secure and reliable form of communication because its not the trend. Too many hapless cattle kept insisting that what i was looking for was home VOIP. Like, I'm only 35 dude. Its not like a landline is morse code telegrams through western union.

A couple of business owners seemed suspicious i would be asking about their landline service and itz relation to the alarm system. I just want my damn landline which runs its wires on every urban, sub-urban and rural block in America

Like itz right in front of all our homes but its so damn hard to tap into as a paying customer now! Like wtf seriously??



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 04:43 AM
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One word :
XFinity



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

You should be able to port your land-line number into a mobile.

Another option is you can port it into Google voice. Let's say you already have a mobile number you want to keep, you can port the land-line to Google voice and have the app on your phone so you're essentially using two numbers on the same phone. The caveat to this one is Google gets to harvest your data.



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

Consumer Cellular has base stations that function like land lines. You plug your sim card into the base station and plug any land line type phone in and Bob's your uncle. I switched my business landlines over to these because it was cheaper ($10/mo. per line), kept the same numbers, etc. The only drawback (for me) is they don't support fax machines. One nice thing is if I go out of town I could take the base station with me.



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker
You answeted my question in reverse. I want a traditional land line i grew up with. Those cables running on all the utility poles include the original land line infeastructure. Its all still there, but like gold so many have neen convinced to abandon it as some arcane primitive tool lacking necessity in the real world.

a reply to: VictorVonDoom
That would still be VOIP requiring the use of an additional internet subscription. I disconnected internet from my physical address for a reason.

Now yall see the dilemma of how difficult it is to get an old school physical landline. If it needs internet, it is not a traditional landline. I dont even need power for the landline to work, hence the reliability factor. I live on that little peter sticking out of the southeast USA, hurricanes and big storms seems to gravitate here like flies to # or moths to a light.

Last time my area suffered a close call people all over town were having trouble with their cellular service due to high volume causing network failures.



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

It's not VOIP. It doesn't require internet, but it does need to be in an area with cell service. It has a built in battery in case you lose power. Think of it as a cell phone that stays on your desk where you can plug in a regular phone.

I switched over for cost savings, $20 a month for two lines vs. $100 for two land lines. We don't get as many hurricanes as you guys do, but I lose internet and power before I lose cell service.



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

What are you talking about is legacy POTS line which stands for Plain Old Telephone Service. Traditionally this runs over older copper infrastructure though has been migrated for just about every Telco and LEC (Local Exchange Carrier) to fiber or some other optical medium over the past decade.

Tip and Ring voltage was provided across that POTS line which is where you got things like power fail phones.

I can tell you that regardless of what you think about currently existing pole infrastructure just about every telco out there is moving off of or has moved off of legacy infrastructure like this. I can also tell you that once you pass your CO (Central Office) VOIP absolutely comes into play on PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network)

You are going to be hard pressed to find a Telco or ITSP that still offers POTS service in the traditional sense. Many of the major legacy telcos like AT&T or Verizon are actually removing this as an offering at the consumer level.



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 01:01 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

Lol, I'm an idiot.

Yes, you were very clear on that.

Hypothetically all numbers should be able to port in any direction. It's how competent the service provider is. You'll need your account numbers and pin from the old phone service provider.

Just don't let your number go into limbo, or they'll recycle it. You can use Google voice to park and reserve it, but fair warning that method can be a pain.

Another option is using a cell phone providers "land line", it uses the towers and is a cheap option for the home. I know you really want a land line, but the cell based ones are comparable in reliability and still have a backup battery in the unit should power go out.



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: VictorVonDoom

Cost is irrelevant to me. I would pay 100 dollars a month for a single line if I can find someone offering it.



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 05:07 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: VictorVonDoom

Cost is irrelevant to me. I would pay 100 dollars a month for a single line if I can find someone offering it.


Well, if price is no object ...




posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 06:19 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
Too many hapless cattle kept insisting that what i was looking for was home VOIP. Like, I'm only 35 dude. Its not like a landline is morse code telegrams through western union.


Actually it pretty much is. Landlines are very old and inefficient. Not worth the upkeep for what they provide, like morse code telegrams



posted on Feb, 22 2022 @ 05:05 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




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