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B-2 exaust

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posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 12:23 PM
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so I was thinking about the B2 and looking at various pictures and videos.

We all know there chemical agents you can spray in to the exhaust so it wont leave a trail but i was wondering if it would be possible to cool it outside the turbine body.

the exhaust of the B2 looks allot like the F23 and has quite a length of aircraft until it hits free air.

what if you were to add cryogenic panels in line with the exhaust so it had to all wash over these super cold plates or have cold air blown into the exhaust stream.

is this even possible?



ETA

triangular or kranked kite transport being tested?
edit on 2-10-2020 by penroc3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 12:31 PM
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Somehow you have to generate the cold to cool down the exaust heat which creates more complexity in power generation and the physics of the plane as theres only so many ways of building a plane to reduce its radar print.

Probably thermals isn't as important a matter in theory as the plane shouldn't be detected in the first place to have to hide its thermals unless something has gone wrong.



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 12:32 PM
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jets only leave a contrail when they get high enough that unburnt fuel freezes.
The B2 exhaust is designed to get it up and away from the body enough that the heat signature is far enough out that heatseeking missiles will not get close enough to do any damage even with a proximity fuse.

Your idea sounds....heavy.

a reply to: penroc3



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: Maxatoria

you could carry a tank of some cryogenic fluid like nitrogen and have it flow into plates in the exhaust stream right before it leaves the jet.

it wouldn't take much power if any, it could be 100% passive,



contrails are made out of ice crystals from the exhaust so if you could cool and dehydrate the exaust with a simple system why not.



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

The way I understand it... Classified...but it pull in outside air and mixes it with the exhaust to reduce the temp.

Honestly if a fighter gets close enough to the B2 to get a thermal lock it's to late anyway.
It's supposed to avoid detection.



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

LN2 takes up a lot of space and doesn't last for long so for some emergency use maybe but you'd have to consider the sudden thermal change of dropping temperatures so fast and then warming back up once the LN2 has ran out.

It might also look a bit strange if theres a subzero area being detected at 25000 ft going at 800+mph and there would be ice formed which may be detected by the radar.



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 02:16 PM
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The B-2 exhaust is designed to go through baffles and a fairly long exhaust tube that cools it. Adding a system to cryo cool it, and you add weight, complexity, and as pointed out, a way to detect something is there by cooling too much. It would have to adaptively adjust to the ambient air around the aircraft to keep from creating ice crystals and contrails.



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

seems live a simple HVAC problem, there are not temperature holes in the sky because the exhaust would be close to ambient temp or as close as the system could get it.

and condensation could be released as larger drops so it remains invisible or might even hide it as a natural weather system
edit on 2-10-2020 by penroc3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

Why bother in the first place? The B-2 was designed at a time when IR/EO detection was in its infancy.



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

And then you have a lot more complexity, weight, a number of failure points, and a system that continuously monitors the outside temp, which adds more complexity and failure points. Or, you can go with the existing system that works just fine, and save yourself all kinds of unnecessary issues.



posted on Oct, 2 2020 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

i guess so

the outlets always seemed over engineered if you will.

what about that transport



posted on Oct, 3 2020 @ 10:44 AM
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Do away with a combustion engine then.



posted on Oct, 24 2020 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: Masisoar
Do away with a combustion engine then.


This is the obvious answer. Perhaps we could get some of those Solyndra funds to pay for the modification.



posted on Oct, 24 2020 @ 10:47 AM
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originally posted by: lakenheath24
jets only leave a contrail when they get high enough that unburnt fuel freezes.
The B2 exhaust is designed to get it up and away from the body enough that the heat signature is far enough out that heatseeking missiles will not get close enough to do any damage even with a proximity fuse.

Your idea sounds....heavy.

a reply to: penroc3



It is the water formed during combustion that freezes and produces a contrail.



posted on Oct, 25 2020 @ 05:22 AM
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Best thing to cool anything down is airflow and fuel lines.



posted on Oct, 25 2020 @ 10:36 PM
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Pretty sure they mainly fly at night when you cannot see many contrails, even during the day and no contrail you can still spot the aircraft, which kind of defeats its stealth as you can scramble jets to intercept it.



posted on Oct, 26 2020 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: Forensick

You'd be surprised at how hard visual spotting is in the day. I've been able to hear an An-12 for a long time, and had it go right over me without seeing it. And that's with having it on a tracker and knowing about where it was.



posted on Oct, 28 2020 @ 02:03 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Forensick

You'd be surprised at how hard visual spotting is in the day. I've been able to hear an An-12 for a long time, and had it go right over me without seeing it. And that's with having it on a tracker and knowing about where it was.


No doubt, and you guys are experts at watching and seeing!

I was thinking more though, "would they" operate these during the day over a non permissive environment?

Was the F-117 shot down during the day over the former Yugoslavia?



posted on Oct, 28 2020 @ 03:08 AM
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a reply to: Forensick

No, they'd be at night only in a non permissive environment. Once we had air superiority, they MIGHT.



posted on Oct, 31 2020 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: Forensick



the luckiest/most skillful SAM use of the millennium goes to the commander of that unit.

he kept his mobile sites on the move and used other sites to relay tracking data gained by poor mission planning and concurrent sightings with the Mk.1 eyeball

he knew the flight path the nighthawk was going to be on and with all the data he had collected and put a missile truck in its path and only switched the radar on at the last second.


the SA-3 might have been an older missile but the commander of the unit used his brain instead of relying only on radar


Id love to talk to his spotters about any EW aircraft seen in the area or taking off.




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