It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Airspace Shutdown

page: 2
20
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:28 PM
link   
a reply to: RazorV66

No, which is why I'll believe it when I see the announcement. A simple airspace shutdown through the FAA would work just as well if that's what they're after. Institute a PPR system for authorized flights, and you get the same effect.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: RazorV66
a reply to: Zaphod58

In your opinion, if this does in fact happen, why would they be doing this well after the fact of keeping the spread down?
Especially when air travel is already way down.
Does it make sense to you for them to do this now?


Although not directed at me, I would say that people in Airliners/Aircraft, along with trains and people traveling across state lines in automobiles are the prime infectors. To me, the only ones that should be in the sky right now are the military for strategic shipments and obviously the security of the country. Trucks and Trains for goods shipments ONLY should keep us ok until things settle down. I don't know about boat shipping, because along with the cargo, are a lot of "passengers".



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:29 PM
link   
What are they going to do, make the CONUS one big TFR? I don’t see that happening. If this scuttlebutt ends up true, what about General Aviation and Agricultural Aircraft?



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:31 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

The aircraft don't need changes because of magnetic north moving. The big change is having to renumber the runways as it moves.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:34 PM
link   
So they are going to shut it down after half a million people came into the country since January 1st...even from China?

Thanks Captain Hindsight.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: rickymouse

I don't think many aircraft use magnetic compasses to navigate.


The whole system needs to be reprogrammed, the magnetic field is used to set up all of the automation technology. the global positioning of every airport needs to be correct, that requires magnetic coordinates.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: rickymouse

The aircraft don't need changes because of magnetic north moving. The big change is having to renumber the runways as it moves.


What happens if the runway is not properly inputed into the system because it is not updated every five years to account for magnetic variation of the poles? So, are you saying they do not have to adjust the whole system? The last unscheduled time it was done there were only a handful of airports that were done and shut down temporarily. I think the end of this year or begining of next was supposed to be the major reprograming.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:42 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

Not really. Navigation doesn't use magnetic coordinates.

And VOR doesn't use coordinates at all.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:43 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

Many of the aircraft flying are cargo, or nearly empty. A good example is Cathay Pacific, since they've published actual numbers. Prior to the pandemic, they averages 100,000 passengers a day. They've cut 97% across the board, and are running about 18% capacity. In one recent 25 hour period they flew fewer than 600 people, yet are still flying several times a week to LA.

For US airlines, CARES requires them to maintain minimum service to all geographic areas they flew to based on a certain date in March(I forget the exact date). So if Delta flew five flights a day to LA, six days a week, they have to maintain at least one flight a day, six times a week. Smaller airports aren't happy about it, because the wording allows the airline to stop service to a small airport in favor of a larger one if they're close enough, and still meet their requirements.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:45 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

We use GPS, even small GA aircraft can shoot a RNAV/GPS precision approach to most airports, even into podunk airports as long as there’s an approach there.

en.m.wikipedia.org...



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:48 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

They're updating the ATC system. Yes, changes are made as magnetic north moves, but with GPS being used for navigation, magnetic navigation has moved to the backup to the backup system, if you lose all power and are on emergency power.

Runways, until they're changed, will use the older headings and will be just fine until they are changed. The aircraft will intercept the ILS and use that for information to get to the runway. That's the big update they'll have to make is to simply change the runway numbers.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

My son in law just flew back from Alaska, on the flight from Anchorage to Seatle, the plane had about eight passengers he could see. From Seattle to Detroit, it was about about a quarter full. When I picked him up at our local airport direct from Detroit, there were three passengers that got off. They had two passengers left on board that were going to another location where the plane was going to stay the night.

Kind of a lot of money to haul so few passengers.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:51 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

The ATC system is what I thought was the navigation system, what is an ATC system anyway?



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 02:55 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

My wife has worked at least 1 flight that had zero passengers. I believe her most recent had 3.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 03:01 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

The navigation system is part of the ATC system, but not the entire system. They're reducing the number of active VOR antennas and planned jetways, and going to GPS navigation, allowing for more direct flights. They're also upgrading the tower systems to include ground proximity warning, displays that show where taxiing aircraft are, and more. They've got a lot of that in place in many areas, but the full upgraded system still isn't in place.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 03:03 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

They're moving a lot in the holds. It is a big hit, but cargo helps. TRANSCOM is finding ways to help as well, contracting commercial aircraft to fly military cargo around in some places. They're trying to ensure the CRAF stays viable with all the aircraft being parked.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 03:16 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

Container vessels are still sailing to ports in countries that still have open ports. A few countries have closed their ports.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 04:09 PM
link   
We just went by Sky Harbor in Phoenix. One plane was coming in to land, and absolutely nothing was moving on the ramp. They're usually lined up 10-15 on the taxiway.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 05:08 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

Source: am pilot

ATC system is a mixture of on airport (terminal/tower/sometimes TRACON approach and departure) and off airport facilities (ARTCC) that use navaids (VORs, GPS, ADS-B) to facilitate and separate air traffic, keeping them on route and on course and obviously from running into each other.
ATC relies on radio communications and radar for a lot of tasks.
The main switch going on now is the migration from ground based radar to satellite based.
This change focuses on ADS-B which stands for Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast. It utilizes satellites and some ground stations to get a good idea of the whereabouts an airplane is in the sky.
ADS-B was mandated for all aircraft (even the little guys) on January 1st, 2020. Exceptions are aircraft built and maintained without an electrical system (cubs etc) and pilots NOT operating within class B airspace or its 30NM veil (big jet airport airspace). So Bubba and Marge in their Cub don't need it.

Pilots still use magnetic headings for VFR (visual, referencing the horizon outside) flight planning, backup, and reference.

To stay on topic,

Yes. I'm seeing a huge decline in air traffic of all sizes and purposes in my area. I haven't been able to get to the airport to get some maintenance done in my old bird, either. A lot of us small pilots are grounded due to Covid-19 so an airspace shutdown wouldn't affect us much. We're already on the ground for the most part.

Flight schools also shut down ops.



posted on Apr, 7 2020 @ 05:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Crosswinds

Your avatar looks like my poor cat BoBo. What bird do you own? Funny, I flew my cub today, ADSB exempt. When I got home I saw the OPs post and I’ll be pissed if they shut us down. I was the only guy at the airport, flew over to another airport to top off the cub, nobody around. But this is common where I live, GA has been in the tank the last few years.
I’d use auto fuel but I can’t find ethanol free anywhere close.

But to make my point, I don’t understand why they would keep guys like us grounded, I made zero contact with a human, and I used hand sanitizer on the pump. I see no real threat of spread of the virus with General Aviation local flights.
edit on 7-4-2020 by 38181 because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
20
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join