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Flat earth theory?

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posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:28 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: oldcarpy

NASA,


An orbit is a regular, repeating path that one object in space takes around another one.



Look its oldcarpy arguing against NASA again.



Looks like it's you quoting the same old stuff out of context and arguing semantics because that is all you have.

All this "Lol"ling that you keep doing. It's not very mature. Quite irritating, actually.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:36 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity




So which is it? Do they orbit around the Earth or do they orbit the center of mass? Why cant you give a specific answer.


I haven't noticed you giving a specific answer to the numerous posters who have made the attempt to educate you.

If you keep asking stupid questions, what do you expect?


(post by InfiniteTrinity removed for a manners violation)

posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:40 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: ManFromEurope

Funny how you sidekicks all say yes but if you ask Neutronflux he refuses to answer YES.





Ok? Your point is what?

Yes. By using “Orbital elements are the parameters required to uniquely identify a specific orbit, a geostationary satellite does have an orbit.



Orbital elements

en.m.wikipedia.org...

The traditional orbital elements are the six Keplerian elements, after Johannes Kepler and his laws of planetary motion.

When viewed from an inertial frame, two orbiting bodies trace out distinct trajectories. Each of these trajectories has its focus at the common center of mass




posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: neutronflux




Yes.


It orbits around the Earth? You are saying it is not stationary above one point on the Earth but is actually moving relative to the surface. This is what you are saying.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Do you have a thing better to to than try to shame, bully, or troll an answer? Especially when you view is greatly mistaken and based on intellectual laziness?



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Your childish belittling of other posters does you little credit.

You plainly having nothing to say other than keep repeating the same old same old, ad nauseam.

Do you still beat your wife? Answer "yes" or "no", please.

Do you see what I did there?



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:44 AM
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originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Do you have a thing better to to than try to shame, bully, or troll an answer? Especially when you view is greatly mistaken and based on intellectual laziness?


Based on my experience so far, the obvious answer to your question would be "no".



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:46 AM
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a reply to: neutronflux




By using “Orbital elements are the parameters required to uniquely identify a specific orbit, a geostationary satellite does have an orbit.




Wether it has an orbit is not relevant to what is being discussed right now.

Th discussion is wether it orbits AROUND the Earth or not and you know it. Why are you so dishonest?



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:46 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux




Yes.


It orbits around the Earth? You are saying it is not stationary above one point on the Earth but is actually moving relative to the surface. This is what you are saying.



What does that have to do with how an orbit is actually define!

Again



en.m.wikipedia.org...

Orbital elements are the parameters required to uniquely identify a specific orbit. In celestial mechanics these elements are generally considered in classical two-body systems, where a Kepler orbit is used. There are many different ways to mathematically describe the same orbit, but certain schemes, each consisting of a set of six parameters, are commonly used in astronomy and orbital mechanics.

Snip

The traditional orbital elements are the six Keplerian elements, after Johannes Kepler and his laws of planetary motion.

When viewed from an inertial frame, two orbiting bodies trace out distinct trajectories. Each of these trajectories has its focus at the common center of mass. When viewed from a non-inertial frame centred on one of the bodies, only the trajectory of the opposite body is apparent; Keplerian elements describe these non-inertial trajectories. An orbit has two sets of Keplerian elements depending on which body is used as the point of reference. The reference body is called the primary, the other body is called the secondary. The primary does not necessarily possess more mass than the secondary, and even when the bodies are of equal mass, the orbital elements depend on the choice of the primary.

Two elements define the shape and size of the ellipse:

Eccentricity (e)—shape of the ellipse, describing how much it is elongated compared to a circle (not marked in diagram).
Semimajor axis (a)—the sum of the periapsis and apoapsis distances divided by two. For circular orbits, the semimajor axis is the distance between the centers of the bodies, not the distance of the bodies from the center of mass.
Two elements define the orientation of the orbital plane in which the ellipse is embedded:

Inclination (i)—vertical tilt of the ellipse with respect to the reference plane, measured at the ascending node (where the orbit passes upward through the reference plane, the green angle i in the diagram). Tilt angle is measured perpendicular to line of intersection between orbital plane and reference plane. Any three points on an ellipse will define the ellipse orbital plane. The plane and the ellipse are both two-dimensional objects defined in three-dimensional space.
Longitude of the ascending node (Ω)—horizontally orients the ascending node of the ellipse (where the orbit passes upward through the reference plane, symbolized by ☊) with respect to the reference frame's vernal point (symbolized by ♈︎). This is measured in the reference plane, and is shown as the green angle Ω in the diagram.
The remaining two elements are as follows:

Argument of periapsis (ω) defines the orientation of the ellipse in the orbital plane, as an angle measured from the ascending node to the periapsis (the closest point the satellite object comes to the primary object around which it orbits, the blue angle ω in the diagram).
True anomaly (ν, θ, or f) at epoch (M0) defines the position of the orbiting body along the ellipse at a specific time (the "epoch").
The mean anomaly is a mathematically convenient "angle" which varies linearly with time, but which does not correspond to a real geometric angle. It can be converted into the true anomaly ν, which does represent the real geometric angle in the plane of the ellipse, between periapsis (closest approach to the central body) and the position of the orbiting object at any given time. Thus, the true anomaly is shown as the red angle ν in the diagram, and the mean anomaly is not shown.

The angles of inclination, longitude of the ascending node, and argument of periapsis can also be described as the Euler angles defining the orientation of the orbit relative to the reference coordinate system.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:48 AM
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a reply to: neutronflux

Deflecting again when we are just about to get to the point? Why are you being so dishonest? You obviously know damn well it doesnt orbit around the Earth thats why you are going out of your way to deflect.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:48 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

I have already stated a Geostationary satellite stays above the same point above earth. That is why they are utilized.
edit on 21-8-2019 by neutronflux because: Added and fixed



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:48 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Yes it does. You cannot say anything against it.


(post by ManFromEurope removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:50 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

You waste of space are confusing earth and center of earth's mass the WHOLE TIME. Breathtaking.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:50 AM
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originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

I have already stayed an Geostationary satellite stays above the same point above earth. That is why they are utilized.


And again you refuse to give a direct answer. So dishonest.

So it stays above the same point on Earth. So it does not move relative to that point. So it does not move around the Earth. So it doesnt orbit around the Earth. Is this false?



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:51 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux




Yes.


It orbits around the Earth? You are saying it is not stationary above one point on the Earth but is actually moving relative to the surface. This is what you are saying.



It is orbiting around Earth.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope




You waste of space are confusing earth and center of earth's mass the WHOLE TIME. Breathtaking.




I am confusing this? Just wow. I have been making the distinction the whole time. So you agree they are not the same. So it doesnt orbit around the Earth.

Thanks for finally admitting it.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:52 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity

originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

I have already stayed an Geostationary satellite stays above the same point above earth. That is why they are utilized.


And again you refuse to give a direct answer. So dishonest.

So it stays above the same point on Earth. So it does not move relative to that point. So it does not move around the Earth. So it doesnt orbit around the Earth. Is this false?


Yes, its stays above a singular point of Earths surface while maintaining a constant, circular path around Earths center of mass.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Instead of trying to shout individuals out, maybe you should do some research.



Basics of the Geostationary Orbit

www.celestrak.com...

Summary

This initial article on geostationary and geosynchronous orbits should give you a basic understanding of some of the fundamental orbital concepts. In our next column, I would like to continue this topic by examining the relationship among the observer, satellite, and the sun to determine a geostationary satellite's longitude, the look angles from a terrestrial observer, and how the position of the sun can affect onboard power management and interference with satellite communications.




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