It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Flat earth theory?

page: 136
14
<< 133  134  135    137  138  139 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 03:23 PM
link   
a reply to: neutronflux




Is the orbit really around the object? Or around the central point of gravity for that object?


It is obviously around the object you cant fly through it around the center.




If the earth’s surface didn’t revolve around its axis, would geostationary orbit be possible as used in this reality?


Of course it couldn't work either its the same thing because in both cases the two objects need to be synched and the satellite doesnt move relative to the direction of gravity.

If an object orbits around a bigger object it has to move relative to the direction of gravity. A stationary satellite does not move relative to Earth so it doesnt move relative to the direction of gravity. It may orbit a point in space but this is irrelevant. It has nothing to do with the gravity of the object.

Stationary orbits are simply not possible.


edit on 15-8-2019 by InfiniteTrinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 03:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Akragon

Lol, so typical.

"Am I right guys...!"

Why dont you say something to save your debunked geostationary orbit debacle?



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 03:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: neutronflux
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

“freefall along the curvature of Earth ”. It’s just free falling at a rate that keeps it above a certain point on the surface of the earth. And in reality, the geostationary satellite is moving at a greater velocity in relationship to the earth’s axis that the certain point on earth’s surface. The satellite is completing a circle with a greater radius for the same amount of time. Is that false.


That is not false, just completely irrelevant since it doesnt change the fact that it doesnt move relative to the direction of gravity, and therefore cannot orbit.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 03:45 PM
link   
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

You


That is not false, just completely irrelevant since it doesnt change the fact that it doesnt move relative to the direction of gravity, and therefore cannot orbit.


Please cite or quote where gravity has a direction.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 03:46 PM
link   
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

You didn’t answer to:

You do understand a geostationary satellite is still completing a circle about the earth’s axis ever 24 hours? (23 hours and 56 minutes to be more specific)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:00 PM
link   
a reply to: neutronflux




You didn’t answer to:


Because it wasnt relevant either. Did you read what I posted?



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:05 PM
link   
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Oh,

You mean



Due to the fact that the force of gravity is downward, it would only seem logical to define downward as a positive direction in gravity equations. This is essentially inverting the Cartesian coordinate system. Using vectors is an effective way to describe the initial and resulting motion of the objects and to set a convention for direction.

www.school-for-champions.com...



Where even a geostationary satellite maintains its orbital stability by......




Orbital stability
Edit
A geostationary orbit can be achieved only at an altitude very close to 35,786 km (22,236 mi) and directly above the equator. This equates to an orbital velocity of 3.07 km/s (1.91 mi/s) and an orbital period of 1,436 minutes, which equates to almost exactly one sidereal day (23.934461223 hours). This ensures that the satellite will match the Earth's rotational period and has a stationary footprint on the ground. All geostationary satellites have to be located on this ring.

en.m.wikipedia.org...



So, a satellite in geostationary orbit has to travel around the earth at 1.91 mile/sec to maintain its orbit. Where the orbital speed of the international space station is 4.76 miles/s. The rotates of the earth’s surface is 0.2880556 miles per second.

A geostationary satellite has to travel around 1.91 miles a second to maintain its “ gravitationally curved trajectory”. Where the surface of the earth rotates .2880556 miles per second.

Therefore, the geostationary satellite has to maintain an orbital speed of 1.91 miles a second to maintain its altitude above earth.


edit on 15-8-2019 by neutronflux because: Added and fixed



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux




You didn’t answer to:


Because it wasnt relevant either. Did you read what I posted?


That you don’t understand a geostationary satellite has to travel around 1.91 miles a second to maintain its “ gravitationally curved trajectory”.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux




You didn’t answer to:


Because it wasnt relevant either. Did you read what I posted?


Again, You do understand a geostationary satellite is still completing a circle about the earth’s axis ever 24 hours? (23 hours and 56 minutes to be more specific)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:12 PM
link   
a reply to: neutronflux




Please cite or quote where gravity has a direction.


The direction is straight down. Since the Earth is curved this direction changes.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:16 PM
link   
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

At a rotational speed of .2880556 miles a second means a spot on earth travels 24,888.00384 miles a day. A Geostationary satellite has to travel about 165,024 in the same time period.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:17 PM
link   
a reply to: neutronflux




So, a satellite in geostationary orbit has to travel around the earth at 1.91 mile/sec to maintain its orbit.




A geostationary satellite doesnt travel around the Earth. It's over.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux




Please cite or quote where gravity has a direction.


The direction is straight down. Since the Earth is curved this direction changes.


Please see: www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux




So, a satellite in geostationary orbit has to travel around the earth at 1.91 mile/sec to maintain its orbit.




A geostationary satellite doesnt travel around the Earth. It's over.


Actually above. All satellites travel above the earth.

A geostationary satellite has to travel around 1.91 miles a second to maintain its “ gravitationally curved trajectory”.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: Akragon

Lol, so typical.

"Am I right guys...!"

Why dont you say something to save your debunked geostationary orbit debacle?


Typical nothing... simple concepts elude flat earthers

They end up patting themselves on the back claiming somethings been debunked when they haven't even grasped the concept of what they claim was debunked

Just like you're doing...

Thing is the only people they convince is themselves while everyone else laughs at their stupidity.

sound familiar?




posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:20 PM
link   
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

A car travels over the earth.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:24 PM
link   
a reply to: neutronflux

Give it up. You cant explain geostationary orbit. It's not an orbit. An orbit requires falling around the object. Geostationary orbit debunked.

Unless anyone else has an actual counterargument? Yeah thought so.


edit on 15-8-2019 by InfiniteTrinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux

Give it up. You cant explain geostationary orbit. It's not an orbit. An orbit requires falling around the object. Geostationary orbit debunked.

Unless anyone else has an actual counterargument? Yeah thought so.



What do you not get a geostationary satellite has to travel around 1.91 miles a second to maintain its “gravitationally curved trajectory”.


And you didn’t answer to:
You do understand a geostationary satellite is still completing a circle about the earth’s axis ever 24 hours? (23 hours and 56 minutes to be more specific)

Why do I have to “explain” anything when I can cite a source.



Techopedia explains Geostationary Orbit

A satellite in geostationary orbit remains exactly above the equator, so it does not change its position with respect to a location on Earth. A geostationary orbit is a path given to high Earth orbiting satellites to monitor weather and for observational and telecommunication purposes. High Earth orbits are orbits that are around 22,236 miles (35,786 kilometers) directly above Earth's equator. This position is ideal since Earth’s gravitational pull is exactly such that the speed of the satellite is kept equal to the orbit velocity of the Earth.

www.techopedia.com...



edit on 15-8-2019 by neutronflux because: Added and fixed



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:39 PM
link   
a reply to: neutronflux

I already told you you can post sources that say its an orbit all day. This doesnt change the fact that it cannot orbit Earth and be geostationary. When are you going to address the issue?



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:44 PM
link   
a reply to: neutronflux




And you didn’t answer to: You do understand a geostationary satellite is still completing a circle about the earth’s axis ever 24 hours? (23 hours and 56 minutes to be more specific)


I did




It may orbit a point in space but this is irrelevant.



new topics

top topics



 
14
<< 133  134  135    137  138  139 >>

log in

join