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Flat earth theory?

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posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:05 AM
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a reply to: neutronflux




our not here for intellectually honest debate are you.


That is my conclusion, too. School holidays?

I wish we could get back on topic with some proper bonkers FE stuff.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: neutronflux




Your not here for intellectually honest debate are you.


If that is your go to reply when someone challenges your beliefs or the scientific paradigm than I think YOU are not here for intellectually honest debate.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:08 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux

"But the math matches up"

Lol, of course it does. The math is based on observation of the effects and says nothing about how it actually works and what it really is, which is what we were discussing.


Funny. They didn’t have any past observations to put the first space probes in orbit around Jupiter and its moons for example. Jupiter would quickly show if calculations were off. The “theoretical” calculations worked very well at predicting the space vehicles’ requirements. I think your argument is false and backwards to a point. Past launches showed calculations using relativity are accurate.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: neutronflux




Your not here for intellectually honest debate are you.


If that is your go to reply when someone challenges your beliefs or the scientific paradigm than I think YOU are not here for intellectually honest debate.


Quote what is false, and cite evidence to support your assertion.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:10 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

How would launching a rocket straight up to place a satellite in orbit save on fuel.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:10 AM
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dp

edit on 15-8-2019 by InfiniteTrinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy




Obviously not. They are not really stationary, they are orbiting the Earth, which is spinning, at the same speed as the Earth spins.


They cannot be orbiting the Earth and be geostationary at the same time.


An orbit is a regular, repeating path that one object in space takes around another one.


www.nasa.gov...

A geostationary satellite takes no path around Earth. It stays above the same location on the surface.

Game over.
edit on 15-8-2019 by InfiniteTrinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:12 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: oldcarpy




Obviously not. They are not really stationary, they are orbiting the Earth, which is spinning, at the same speed as the Earth spins.


They cannot be orbiting the Earth and be geostationary at the same time.


An orbit is a regular, repeating path that one object in space takes around another one.


www.nasa.gov...

A geostationary satellite takes no path around Earth. It stays above the same location relative to the surface.

Game over.


What part of orbiting the Earth at the same speed that the Earth spins to maintain a geostationary orbit are you not understanding?



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy




What part of orbiting the Earth at the same speed that the Earth spins to maintain a geostationary orbit are you not understanding?


What part of Geostationary do you not understand? It doesnt move in relation to the Earth so it doesnt orbit. I just gave you NASA definition of orbit.




An orbit is a regular, repeating path that one object in space takes around another one.


What part of objects path around other object do you not understand?


Game over.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Hold on, are you by any chance a Flat Earther? Do you not believe that the Earth is spinning or something? Do tell.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

And the change of subject.

Game over.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:24 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: oldcarpy




What part of orbiting the Earth at the same speed that the Earth spins to maintain a geostationary orbit are you not understanding?


What part of Geostationary do you not understand? It doesnt move in relation to the Earth so it doesnt orbit. I just gave you NASA definition of orbit.




An orbit is a regular, repeating path that one object in space takes around another one.


What part of objects path around other object do you not understand?


Game over.


You losing $§%. IT DOES NOT MOVE RELATIVE TO A POINT ON EARTHS SURFACE!

No way you are trolling, righto?



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Either you cannot understand simple science or you are just being deliberately obtuse. No idea what "game" you think you are playing but you are, with all due respect, about as good at playing games as you are at understanding how stuff works. In what will no doubt be a fruitless attempt at getting some education into you please read this:

earchmobilecomputing.techtarget.com/definition/geostationary-satellite




A geostationary satellite is an earth-orbiting satellite, placed at an altitude of approximately 35,800 kilometers (22,300 miles) directly over the equator, that revolves in the same direction the earth rotates (west to east). At this altitude, one orbit takes 24 hours, the same length of time as the earth requires to rotate once on its axis. The term geostationary comes from the fact that such a satellite appears nearly stationary in the sky as seen by a ground-based observer. BGAN, the new global mobile communications network, uses geostationary satellites.


Earth. Orbiting. You see?



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

Funny, from your quoted source....



What Is an Orbit?

www.nasa.gov...

Where Do Satellites Orbit Earth?
The International Space Station is in low Earth orbit, or LEO. LEO is the first 100 to 200 miles (161 to 322 km) of space. LEO is the easiest orbit to get to and stay in. One complete orbit in LEO takes about 90 minutes.

Satellites that stay above a location on Earth are in geosynchronous Earth orbit, or GEO. These satellites orbit about 23,000 miles (37,015 km) above the equator and complete one revolution around Earth precisely every 24 hours. Satellites headed for GEO first go to an elliptical orbit with an apogee about 37,015 km. Firing the rocket engines at apogee then makes the orbit round. Geosynchronous orbits are also called geostationary.




posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:25 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
a reply to: InfiniteTrinity

They are falling down, the whole time.

They just keep missing earth and stay in their orbit, because their lateral velocity is *exactly* high enough to miss earth and stay in that distance.

Lateral velocity, that is the key some people are missing here.

You cannot stay in orbit without getting shot up in an angle different from 90° towards earths ground.
Look, its really simple: shoot a target with a gun aimed parallel to ground - your projectile hits ground in the distance.
Now, aim straight up, 90° towards ground: the projectile reaches maximum height, but will drop on your head. No distance.
Aim at the middle, 45° = maximum distance. But not in orbit?! Because your nozzle velocity was too low.

Now, point that gun/rocket at the correct angle with enough velocity, and the flying curve of the projectile *just* misses earth. Math is helping here. You can calculate the perfect speeds and angle for every orbit, where that projectile falls around earth instead of missing.

Ignore this posting on your own.


I will pull this up until you acknowledge it.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

Rats, you got to it first...

👍



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:26 AM
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originally posted by: InfiniteTrinity
a reply to: oldcarpy

And the change of subject.

Game over.


Try taking a look at the title of this thread?



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

You really are incapable of thinking for yourself, arent you. Yes all these sources say they orbit.

I am pointing out that this is impossible.

A geostationary satellite doesnt move relative to the surface of the Earth. It doesnt go around the Earth. Its geostationary.




An orbit is a regular, repeating path that one object in space takes around another one.


A geostationary satellite doesnt move around the Earth so it cannot be orbiting, according to NASA itself.

Instead of posting more sources that say its orbiting, explain the huge contradiction.


edit on 15-8-2019 by InfiniteTrinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

Please we were discussing a specific subject then you suddenly changed it to my beliefs about another subject.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope




IT DOES NOT MOVE RELATIVE TO A POINT ON EARTHS SURFACE!


Exactly, so how is it orbiting the Earth? It isnt. It has to move relative to the surface in order to orbit.
edit on 15-8-2019 by InfiniteTrinity because: (no reason given)



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